Places to go and things to see by Gypsy Bev

Archive for June, 2015

John Glenn Delights Audience during Charlie Rose Interview

New Albany's McCoy Center presents the Jefferson Series.

New Albany’s McCoy Center presented Glenn as part of The Jefferson Series.

Blasting off to outer space may be something we joke about, but for John Glenn, it was the real thing. Born in Cambridge, Ohio, John Glenn grew up in nearby New Concord. Always interested in science, there he acquired the determination and desire to enter the military and eventually become part of NASA’s space team.

Recently, 93-year-old Glenn spoke in an interview setting conducted by award winning journalist, Charlie Rose, at the McCoy Center in New Albany. Inspired by Thomas Jefferson’s life-long adventure in learning, New Albany Community Center conducts The Jefferson Series, comprised of interviews with great thinkers of our time.

Video showed history of John Glenn.

Video showed history of John Glenn.

Prior to the actual interview, a short video was shown covering Glenn’s childhood and many of his major accomplishments. This provided opportunity for the audience to get to know John Glenn better.  His interest in flying began when he was eight years old and his dad took him flying from a small airport near Cambridge. Glenn was hooked! He immediately went home and began building model airplanes.

When 93-year old Glenn came on stage, there was a standing ovation for this Ohio born, national hero. Throughout the evening, his recall of events of his life was phenomenal, as well as his ability to think about the future. His sense of humor often filled the auditorium with laughter during the interview.

In introduction, Rose proclaimed, “Glenn is one of the great national heroes of our time.” Although Glenn was very humble about that remark, his participation in the Marines, space program, US Senate, and education programs verify that title.

He flew 149 combat missions as a Marine fighter pilot where he was awarded six Distinguished Flying Crosses, the Air Medal, The World War II Victory Medal, and four Service Medals. When asked, “Who’s the best pilot you ever knew?” Glenn quickly responded, “Me!” He said if you don’t have the correct training and attitude of being the best, you shouldn’t be a fighter pilot.

Charlie Rose interviews John Glenn, age 93.

Charlie Rose interviews John Glenn in 2015.

Then he entered the space program where he flew two missions. He was the first American to orbit the earth in 1962 on Friendship 7, and later in 1998, at the age of 77, Glenn volunteered for another orbital mission to experiment on the effects of space travel on the elderly. The second flight was another record setter, as it made him the oldest man to fly in space.

One of the favorite things to do on these flights is look out the window. Glenn described the beauty of the sunsets from space, where the angle of the sun’s rays makes all the colors of the spectrum visible. Charlie Rose told him, “You sound like a poet, not a pilot.”

John and Annie Glenn and Charlie Rose welcomed students on stage.

John and Annie Glenn with Charlie Rose welcomed students on stage.

The International Space Station holds special interest for Glenn, but it upsets him that we pay Russia $65,000,000 for each astronaut to be taken there. He obviously wants the United States to become more active in their own space program as the lessons learned are valuable.

Between those space flights, Glenn served as U.S. Senator from Ohio for four terms. Glenn said he had aspirations of being in politics since he was a youngster and credited his high school teachers for instilling that value. Doing something for your country is exhilarating. He reminded the crowd, “Every person here is a politician and part of this solution.”

Glenn thought for a few seconds when Charlie Rose asked him, “Which president do you admire the most?” Glenn’s answer, “Bill Clinton.” He said Clinton brought about good programs, and for the first time in a long, long time we were actually paying down the national debt.

When asked about his feelings on troops being sent to Iraq, Glenn quickly answered, “No, I would not have voted for the war in Iraq.” He said he had been through two wars and they were not very pleasant things. He was also skeptical that recent deployments of military advisors to Iraq will make much of a difference, since “they’ve been fussing over there for 2,000 years”.

Students in attendance had the opportunity to be on stage with the Glenns and Rose.

Students in attendance had the opportunity to be on stage with the Glenns and Rose.

Education has become a big issue for the future as we are now in a global competition. He credited his teachers for starting him on the right path and encouraged students to learn about their government through Civics class promotion. At the end of his interview, he asked all students to come on stage. At that time his wife, Annie, joined him and they had their pictures taken with the group.

Freeze dried ice cream added flavor to the road trip.

Freeze dried ice cream added flavor to the road trip.

There wasn’t a dull moment in the interview, as Glenn and Rose brought vitality to the stage while discussing past, present and future. Today you can learn more about John and Annie Glenn by stopping in New Concord at John & Annie Glenn Historic Site, where a visit earlier in the evening provided dinner dessert, Freeze-Dried Ice Cream.

Makes me proud to be from the same area where John and Annie Glenn grew up.

Visit the John & Annie Glenn Historic Site, located in Glenn’s boyhood home, at 72 W. Main Street in New Concord, Ohio on old US Route 40 between Cambridge and Zanesville. 

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The Personality of a Hat

 

Dad usually wore this hat.

Dad usually wore this working hat.

When you put on a hat, you take on its character. Children put on a cowboy hat and pretend they are riding the range, or a helmet and pretend to be headed for space. A woman puts on a Victorian hat and feels more a lady.

My Dad always wore a hat. Before leaving the house, he’d pick up a hat and with a snap of his fingers, place it on his head. Each time a different hat appeared on his head, Dad’s personality seemed to change.

Dad dons his felt hat.

Dad dons his felt hat when he gets dressed up.

Most days he would grab an old “hunky cap” when heading for work at Cambridge Glass Company or on the farm. “Hunky” was a term used disparagingly in the early 1900s to describe the men from Hungary and Czechoslovakia who did manual labor. This flat hat with a snap on the bill was worn most often. When wearing this hat, his demeanor usually became more serious.

Going to town on Saturday or to church on Sunday, a different hat would appear. Wearing a white shirt and dress slacks, Dad always donned a gray felt hat that dipped slightly over his right eye. That gave him a debonair look in my eyes. I’m sure he felt like a handsome gentleman when tipping his hat to the ladies.

Dad wears his straw hat with his two favorite girls.

Dad wears his straw hat with his two favorite girls.

Every time we visited, this well-mannered fellow removed his hat in the house, and would place it on the couch or chair nearby. Children clamored to sit by this storyteller, but he’d warn them, with a shake of his finger and a wink of his eye, “Don’t sit on my hundred dollar hat.”

When summer arrived, Dad dressed in yet another hat. This time it was a Panama hat to stay cooler in the hot summer sun. He always smiled when wearing that hat. Perhaps the warm summer days brought happiness, or maybe this time of year held delightful memories, but he always walked with a spring in his step when wearing that straw hat.

No matter what hat Dad wore, his face always wore a smile.

Hopalong Cassidy Festival in Cambridge Comes to an End

Vendors from all over the United States displayed their western wares.

Vendors from all over the United States displayed their western wares.

Hoppy and his horse greeted visitors to the 25th Hopalong Cassidy Festival.

Hoppy and his horse greeted visitors to the 25th Hopalong Cassidy Festival.

“Have a Hoppy Day!”

Old friends and familiar faces congregated May 1-3, 2015  to honor the last Hopalong Cassidy Festival. Started in 1991, this year marked the 25th Anniversary and the final year for the festival. But the enthusiasm did not end even though participants knew the end was in sight.

William “Hopalong Cassidy” Boyd grew up in the Cambridge area where he attended Park School and the Second Presbyterian Church. The Silver Anniversary of the festival celebration took place at Pritchard Laughlin Civic Center near Cambridge, Ohio.

This little cowgirl enjoyed the day.

This little cowgirl enjoyed the day.

Laura Bates, founder, has been the driving force of the Hopalong Cassidy Festival all 25 years. Laura became good friends with Grace, Hoppy’s wife, and Laura’s knowledge and collection of Hoppy memorabilia grew and grew. When Laura speaks of those dedicated followers who attended year after year, she fondly calls them “faithful buckaroos”.

Getting a festival together requires lots of hard work. Making the connections with nearly a hundred vendors in itself would take a lot of time. Add to that the necessity to connect with old western stars and you can see how overwhelming the task would be. Besides, the general public today does not have the intense interest about those old westerns as those who grew up watching them.

Look-a-likes John Wayne, enjoy visiting with the crowd.

Look-a-likes John Wayne, Lash LaRue, and Bob Steele enjoy visiting with the crowd.

Old friends, who dressed as look-a-likes, enjoyed posing together. John Wayne, Lash LaRue, and Bob Steele definitely looked their part. Most people were selling pictures, but some were giving them away. Vendors set up tables selling all kinds of Western and cowboy items.

LaRue and his wife got married in the same church where Hoppy used to attend in Cambridge.

Francis Reeves and his wife got married in the same church Hoppy attended in Cambridge.

Most participants come across as common ordinary folks, who enjoyed talking about their life and connection to Hopalong Cassidy. One interesting gentleman, Francis Reeves, had won six Hoppy look-alike contests over the years. His initial contact came through Fred Scott, who sent a card to him telling him about the festival.

Twenty years ago Francis married his wife in Cambridge at the Second Presbyterian Church, the same church Hoppy attended. At 85 years old, Francis is still muscle bound and full of energy. When asked about the end of the festival, Francis remarked, “Everything comes to an end.” He looks forward to better things ahead.

Scruffy and Laura Bates give a final farewell.

Fuzzy and Laura Bates, founder, give a final farewell.

25th Anniversary tee shirt designed to honor Laura Bates.

25th Anniversary tee shirt designed to honor Laura Bates.

Fuzzy of American Westerns designed the logo for the festival. This year he designed a special tee shirt for the 25th anniversary. He included a picture of Laura Bates on that tee, as a special surprise to her. But like many, Fuzzy travels around the country with his acts and displays, covering seventeen different states.

Hoppy plans for the future include a bronze statue of Hopalong Cassidy in Cambridge, Ohio. The Hopalong Cassidy Museum will still contain Laura’s collection and she will probably stop by and charm visitors with her stories.

Everyone remained in good spirits even when the festival came to a close. One cowgirl said she would continue at other festivals in this part of the country.”I’ve been horsing around all my life,” she quipped, “and not ready to stop.”

Summer Fun Awaits at Oglebay’s Good Zoo

This red-railed hawk travels as a Good Zoo representative from Raptor Protection.

This red-tailed hawk travels as a Good Zoo representative from their Raptor Protection program.

The Red Panda is a zoo favorite.

The Red Panda is a zoo favorite.

Children and animals have a special bonding so it becomes only natural that children enjoy visiting the zoo. Oglebay’s Good Zoo, a small zoo in Wheeling, West Virginia, gives children opportunity to get some up close and personal contact with many of their animals.The zoo was named in memory of Philip Mayer Good, a seven year old boy who left this world too soon.

 

In 1977, Philip’s parents, Barbara and Larry Good, who managed the family business of L.S. Good in Wheeling, sponsored getting the 30 acres established as a place that all children could enjoy. Thousands of contributions poured in from the community, while school children collected jars of pennies to help the cause.

Originally, the animals at the zoo came from North America, but over the years endangered species have been added to the viewing area. That expanded list now includes: the Red Panda, Grevy’s Zebra, African Wild Dogs, and Tamarin Monkeys.

Today the Good Zoo houses over five hundred animals. A walk down the shaded sidewalk fills a child’s heart and step with wonder. What animal will they see around the next bend?

C.P. Huntington Train Ride

C.P. Huntington Train Ride

While the animals are the most important part of the Good Zoo, a ride on the C.P. Huntington Train takes visitors on a mile and a half ride through the edge of the zoo where many animals can be spotted. Everyone enjoys a ride on the open air train while the toot-toot of the whistle brings cheers from those on board.

Walk with the kangaroos.

Walk with the kangaroos.

Two of the newer exhibits are The Outback and Lorikeet Landing. The Outback contains Kangaroo Creek Mining Company, where you can pan for gemstones and fossils. A “G’Day Mates” sign welcomes you to an enclosed area with a sidewalk, permitting guests to walk within a couple feet of the kangaroos. The aviary section at Lorikeet Landing allows feeding the beautiful Rainbow Lorikeets while walking in their midst.

Take a break at the playground.

Take a break at the playground.

Let the children run off some of their extra energy at the outstanding playground. Here they can climb up ladders into forts, or crawl through tunnels until they’re ready to walk on to the next animal adventure.

Donkeys play with powder and box at the Red Barn.

Donkeys like toys too. Here they play with a box and roll in the powder at the Red Barn.

The Red Barn has always been a favorite spot where friendly domesticated animals reside. Here you might see donkeys, goats, and llamas. Some you can get close enough to pet.

On the grounds, a Veterinary Hospital provides care for all the animals plus those in Raptor Rehabilitation. This program cares for injured animals found in the area. Owls and vultures had broken wings that needed repaired, while a red-tailed hawk became a permanent resident after the loss of one eye.

Find hands on learning at the Discovery Center.

Find hands-on learning at the Discovery Center.

But there’s more inside! The Good Zoo lists conservation and education as their key features. A hands-on Discovery Center lets students observe small animals such as dart frogs, turtles and tamarin monkeys. The Benedum Theater & Planetarium shares a wide variety of programs about nature and the universe.

Engineers ready the O-gauge trains for the summer season.

Operators ready the O-gauge trains for the summer season.

A special section that entertains children and dads is their train display started in 1981. Here you will find West Virginia’s largest public O-gauge model train exhibit with 900′ of track. Detailed buildings located on mountainous terrain combine with Lionel trains to create exciting viewing from every angle.

All through the year, the Good Year has activities which delight youngsters and parents alike. These include fun experiences at an Easter egg hunt, “Boo at the Zoo”, and  “The Good Zoo Lights Up for You” during the Christmas season.

Sounds like the fun continues all year long at the Good Zoo.

Oglebay’s Good Zoo is located just off I-70 near Wheeling, West Virginia. Take Exit 2A and follow Bethany Pike, then make a left on WV-88 North. Signs along the way help greatly with directions.

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