Places to go and things to see by Gypsy Bev

Marlbe King bag of marbles    Many will remember going to school with your bag of marbles so you could join a game at recess. Someone drew a large circle on the playground, participants knuckled down, and the game began. Each player had their own special shooter marble which was usually their largest marble. Mine had a light blue swirl.

   The goal was to shoot a marble outside the circle. You then kept that marble for the rest of the game. Then students either played “for fair” in which marbles were all returned to their owner or “for keeps” – no explanation needed.

Marble King Berry

“Marble King” Berry Pink began selling marbles in the 1930s.

   Someone had to make those special marbles and this is their story. It all began in the 1930s when Berry Pink was selling marbles manufactured by Peltier Glass. By the 1940s, Pink was selling more marbles than Sellers Peltier could produce so they decided to combine their talents of manufacturing and salesmanship in a new company.

   Berry Pink gave away marbles as he traveled around the country hosting marble tournaments. He became known as the “The Marble King” to the children along the way. When the company was founded in 1949, Marble King seemed a fitting name for this new organization.

Marble King Building

The marble factory is located in Paden City, West Virginia.

   At that time the company was located in St. Mary’s, West Virginia. But in 1958, a fire destroyed the factory and the manager, Roger Howdyshell moved the plant to Paden City where it remains today.

Marble King Dad

When he was manager, Roger Howdyshell purchased Marble King in 1963 and his family still owns it today.

   Howdyshell left his mark on the marble industry in several ways. He led Marble King to the top of marble manufactures when he designed the first American made Cat’s Eye marbles. In 1983, Roger Howdyshell purchased Marble King and dedicated his life to making it a success. While Roger died in 1991, the Howdyshell family still operates Marble King and carries on that fine tradition set by Roger.

Marble Rollers

Hot glass is cut into small pieces and rolled into marbles.

   Today, Beri Fox presides over Marble King, the only factory in the United States that manufactures marbles. She was named for Berry Pink and worked at Marble King with her mom and dad all of her life. On summer vacations from college, Beri worked in the family business.

   At that time, most marbles were used in games and toys for companies like Mattel and Ideal. But when video games became popular, Marble King had to make the transition to other uses for their beautiful glass gems. Now, marbles are being used in floral designs, jewelry, architecture, and industrial applications.

Marble King Walt filling the furnace

Wal Lancaster fills the furnace with recycled glass.

   Beri explained, “You can be a broken piece of glass and we can transition you into something new again.” 90% of their marbles are made from cullet glass, which is scrap glass melted down for reuse from several area glass companies. They can make a million marbles a day when in full production.

Marble King Champions

National Marble King champions visit with Beri at the factory.

   This is a frequent stop for tour buses and school groups as they come to learn the history of marbles and have fun along the way. The gift shop includes a 12-foot ring like the one that is used at the National Marbles Tournament in Wildwood, New Jersey. Marble King has been a proud tournament sponsor since 1968. Winners are presented with a $2,000 scholarship for post-secondary education. This year, a virtual tournament was held due to the coronavirus; next year, Marble King will sponsor the West Virginia Marble Festival in Paden City.

Marble King Beri with children

Beri enjoys visiting with children as they play with marble games in the gift shop.

   Kids have a chance to play Ringer in the gift shop. This is one of the traditional marble games where 13 marbles are placed in an X inside a circle. The challenge is to see who can be the first one to knock out seven marbles. “The opportunity to work in an industry that involves kids is what is truly important,” stated Beri. She always enjoys a chance to play Ringer with the kids when they stop by.

Marble King demonstration

   Most people think of marbles being used in toys and games. However, there are many other uses for marbles. Some are used as decorations for weddings, jewelry, fish tanks, and infiltration systems. When you shake a can of spray paint, that rattle you hear is an industrial use of a marble. Special marbles are even used in making wine and beer. They have even been used by NASA for testing in their space balloons. The list of uses is amazing.

Marble King Marble Tower

Towers filled with Marble King marbles create a great conversation piece.

   Their marbles have even made the movies! “Goonies”, “Hook”, and “Home Alone” have featured Marble King marbles as props. Robin Williams used Marble King marbles when he recaptured his youth as Peter Pan.

Marble King marbles

   Marble King marbles are made using recycled glass in the U.S.A. seven days a week, three hundred sixty-five days a year. Marbles have been shipped all over the world to over 17 countries, including Australia, Germany, France, United Kingdom, and Canada. In 2000, Marble King won the Governor’s Award for Excellent in Exporting.

Marble King at Grave Creek Mound

Grave Creek Mound Museum in Moundsville, West Virginia, uses Marble King marbles to create their logo in a large mural.

   In Moundsville, West Virginia at the Grave Creek Mound Archaeological Complex an entire wall displays their beauty in a fantastic, colorful design. Here 47,523 marbles replicate the logo of Marble King.

Marble King Altard States

Altar’d State uses Marble King marbles with a lighted background in every store.

   Altar’d State stores use a clear glass panel filled with Marble King marbles as the backdrop in each store. Lighted from behind, this creates a very beautiful and glowing welcome.

Marble King Marbles 2    Visit their interactive museum and gift shop in Paden City to discover why Marble King is known for quality, tradition, and history all over the world. It’s extra special because today they are the only marble company still producing Made in America marbles.

Made in America parade

Marble King was recognized as an American Made Hero and served, along with others, as the Grand Marshall of the St. Patrick’s Day Parade in Boston.

   After 70 years in business, Marble King marbles have earned the right to be called the world’s best-known, and best-loved marbles.

    Marble King is located in Paden City, WV. From Marietta take US-2 North and from Wheeling take US -2 South.  Turn on Park Street and then 1st Avenue. The Gift Shop will be at 401 S 1st Avenue.

DG Welding & Design is located in Malta along the Muskingum River.

Design and art are in David Griesmyer’s blood. He owns DG Welding and Design in Malta along the Muskingum River where he works on many creative metal projects. All his life, he has had a passion for art through drawing, painting, and fabrication.

Most of his life sketches were his creative outlet before he discovered welding.

When David was a child, he was fortunate to have a father who was also an artist. During church services, the best way to keep David quiet was to give him a drawing pad and a pencil. David still keeps many of those early drawings as sketching was the only thing he did artistically before 2014. Now sketches are the beginning of his sculptures.

This sculpture can be found at the Morgan County Library. It shows General Daniel Morgan and his wife Abigail, who taught him how to read and write.

While David spent his first seven years living outside Zanesville, most of his life has been spent traveling the world. When he came back to the United States, he settled in Florida and Georgia but frequently came back to the Morgan County/Zanesville area to visit family. He has deep ancestral roots there.

A sculpture of a dragonfly can be found on the top of David’s business.

David gained experience in fabrication due to his position as a representative of a medical company where he repaired and fabricated medical instruments. However, his idea for designing with metal began at a stop light in Macon, Georgia. There in an empty parking lot a vision of people welding metal flashed through his mind.

DG Welding & Design is currently making new furniture for Hocking College Hotel.

It wasn’t long before David moved to Malta and opened his metal fabrication business in 2014 in a garage. His business has many facets from sculpture and fabrication to welding and custom design. When visiting his business recently, David and his brother, Will, who has a master’s in mechanical engineering, were designing furniture for Hocking College Hotel.

His first sculpture was one of a welder, made when he attended welding class in 2014.

David’s first sculpture in 2014 even took him by surprise. He was taking welding classes at Washington County Career Center when one week he designed a sculpture of a welder, starting with his footprint and working up to his holding a welding torch and wearing a welding mask. Thus began his journey into making sculptures.

David displayed some of his sculptures at a previous Salt Fork Festival.

This sculptor’s goal would be to leave a lasting impression of the beauty of art in southeastern Ohio. His family is the most important thing in the world to him. He wants to leave a legacy so his children will have pride in their family and community.

Having lived in Florida, David had a special fondness for manatees.

A special dream that has captured his attention is building an Art Corridor that will be the largest outdoor art exhibit in the world. Right now Switzerland has an art corridor that stretches for 65 miles. David, the artistic director, is aiming for one that will stretch 230 miles and perhaps farther in southeastern Ohio.

Creating those large fish was something David enjoyed.

His creative mind uses scrap metal or metal from Waterford Tank in Beverly to design most of his projects. While David still plans to produce some of the sculptures along the way, he is hoping others will do their part to expand this project over the years. Art that is already present along the way will certainly be used.

“School of Fish” can be found across the road from the Morgan County Fairgrounds.

The first exhibit was put in place in 2018 along Ohio 176 near the Morgan County Fairgrounds. David donated this “School of Fish,” a metal sculpture of three fish that are 90-feet long and 15-feet high. Under each fish there are 16,000 pounds of concrete to hold the sculpture in place.

This sculpture of a ballerina having tea found a home quickly.

Sculptures will highlight events that are special to a particular area and tell their history. Since hunting is one big attraction in southeastern Ohio, his next giant project will be a 15′ buck and a deer with two fawn. David wants to provide people with access to art, culture and educational experiences as well as bring tourists into the area.

His twirling ballerina won first prize in the National Welding Art Competition – Weld On.

So many ideas come to David’s mind for future sculptures such as a giant rhinoceros for The Wilds, or a girl with an umbrella for the Gale Garden. Recently, the Cleveland Ballet contacted him to make a ballerina for their theater. There’s no stopping his dreams for making beautiful things.

A boy flying his kite was a special project.

At this time there are eight artistic creations that are part of Ohio Art Corridor. They include David’s sculpture, the murals in Circleville, a Human Rights Garden created by the students of Portsmouth, and the Flight of the Hawk Sculpture Park in Lancaster.

This beautiful angel shows his skill at design.

While this idea has so many possibilities, community support is the key to its success. Expectations are that the project will take five to ten years to complete, and hopefully will never be completed but added to over the years.

David’s work can be seen in McConnelsville across from the Morgan County Fairgrounds as well as in front of the Morgan County Library. Look for some lovely ballerinas in the window of Center Stage Performing Arts Studio in Malta.

David sketches another project under his popular “Tree of Life.”

Keep your eyes drawn to the Ohio Art Corridor for its exciting future under the watchful eye of sculptor David Griesmyer.

Sometimes our choice is not between right and wrong, rather it is between good, better, and best. ~David Griesmyer

DG Welding and Design is located in Malta, Ohio along the beautiful Muskingum River at 1252 NW Front Street.

Invest in your health!

Bell Barn

Their barn has become a symbol of her bakery business.

Bell Farmstead Bakery & Products came about as a result of Lisa Bell’s chronic stomach issues. While she tried the advice of many doctors, nothing seemed to relieve her problem. Then in 2014, she met a holistic doctor that had a bit of different advice.

Bell- Strawberry Oat Muffin

People like these strawberry oat muffins so well they buy them by the dozen.

   This doctor suggested she try a gluten free diet for a couple of weeks just to see how she felt. That meant that she was to eat no products with grains such as wheat, barley, and rye. Within three days, she felt better than she had ever felt; however, it took a year for complete healing and recovery. Her husband decided to try the diet with her and found he too felt much better.

   While Lisa started her gluten free business due to her own severe health issues, now she is helping others overcome this problem.  One of the first things they need to do is visit their doctor and schedule a test for Celiac, an immune reaction to eating gluten that damages the small intestine lining and prevents absorption of nutrients.

Bell - eggs, fried potatoes, Zucchini applesaue bread toasted with butter

This gluten free breakfast of eggs, fried potatoes, and toasted applesauuce bread looks mighty appealing.

   Once she found the gluten free diet made her feel so much better, her problem was finding tasty gluten free products. There weren’t any bakeries that offered anything gluten free and what she found in stores was dry, made with preservatives, using mega white rice flour and tapioca starch.  To correct this problem, Bell Farmstead Bakery & Products was born in 2016.

Bell Banana Nut Bread

Get to the Farmer’s Market early if you want some of Lisa’s banana nut bread.

   It became important to Lisa to not only have the products taste better but she wanted them to have nutritional value. She studied the ancient grains that our ancestors would have grown and used, such as amaranth, sorghum, and millet. Then she experimented with flaxseed meal, coconut, almond, and garbanzo bean flours. These flours are what bring the unique flavor and texture to her products.

   Most of the recipes used in her baked goods are ones she has created herself by trial and error for her family. She discovered that by using organic and non-gmo ingredients, products were not only healthier but also more flavorable.

Lisa and chicken

Her chickens provide the perfect eggs for her baked goods.

   Her chickens are even fed organic food. They start out with a feed ordered from Virginia that has no soy and then graduate to layer feed, which has no soy or wheat content. Any extras are organic produce that is grown by Lisa. After all, these eggs are what she uses in her baked goods.

Bell Pancake Mix

Bell pancake mix is Husband tested, Husband approved!

   Lisa is also president of the Cambridge Rise and Shine Farmer’s Market. This market only accepts homegrown produce, herbs, flowers, and plants as well as handcrafted goods. They cannot be purchased in bulk from an auction house but must be from the farmer’s garden. Here you get a chance to talk to the farmers that have produced the crops and get their suggestions for using them.

   Her products are sold at Rise & Shine Farmers’ Market, which is open every Friday morning May through October at the Southgate Hotel parking lot in Cambridge. Her products cater to those with food allergies and are all corn, soy, xanthan gum, gluten, and peanut free. Wheat, rye, or barley are not allowed in any of her products. Many people feel better when they avoid these foods.

Bell - Lisa in her herbs

Lisa can often be found working in her herb garden.

   Correct care of gardens and fields is of utmost importance. Chemical spraying of crops before or after planting contributes harmful substances to the body. Simply, you can’t digest poison! So the importance of pure crops is high on the list.

Lisa at Market Place SFF

Lisa was at one time chairman of the Marketplace for Salt Fork Festival.

   She also participates in the River City Farmers’ Markets in Marietta every other week. In past years, she also has organized the Marketplace for the Salt Fork Arts & Crafts Festival. Each market seems to bring new experiences such as hot sunshine, rain, wind, and even snow has been encountered.

Bell Apple Cinnamon Oat Muffins   Every week Lisa bakes something a little different for the Farmers’ Market crowd. A few of those treats from past weeks have included Zucchini Applesauce Bread, Rhubarb Mint Pie, and Apricot Date Scones. Something delicious always appears from her ovens.

Lisa - Wedding Cake

This gluten free wedding cake  looks and tastes delicious.

   There’s a wide assortment of breads, muffins, and pies available. Try some of her buckwheat or oat flax ginger pancake mixes. About a half dozen different oatmeal mixes include Raisin Cinnamon, Cranberry Almond Ginger, and Plum Vanilla. When talking with her recently, she was baking a vegan birthday cake and has also done wedding cakes.

Lisa - Organic Strawberry Patch

This organic strawberry patch provides fresh fruit for her baked goods.

   Lisa established her bakery because she doesn’t believe that being Celiac or having a food intolerance or allergy should prevent a person from having a tasty meal or a scrumptious dessert. Her goal is to create products that taste awesome and have nutritious value. Good nutrition is the key to a healthy immune system.

Lisa - Paloma chicken coop

Lisa served as local chief humane officer for livestock. Her animals are an important part of her life.

   When asked what advice she would give others, Lisa says without hesitation, “Invest in your health by eating healthy, get plenty of fresh air and sunshine, and practice grounding each day. Have faith in God and let Him be in charge of your life.” Grounding, or earthing, is the process of placing your bare feet on the ground for at least fifteen minutes a day to reconnect your body with the earth’s energy.

Bell Commercial   Right now, Lisa and her husband, Rick, are refurbishing a second house on their property to use as a commercial bakery. This is a very exciting endeavor and promises to give Lisa a place to experiment with her recipes while having a showroom where she can sell her products.

Bell Cooking Outdoors

Cooking outdoors is a year-round favorite for her family.

   She proudly states, “Everything I create is with a purpose and good intention not just for my family, but for you and your family also.” Contact Lisa at Bell Farmstead Bakery at 740-680-1866 or email her at bellfarmstead@yahoo.com. Visit her website at www.bellfarmsteadgfbakery.com .

   If you are having stomach problems and fatigue, Lisa would suggest that you have your doctor run a test for Celiac. Let her know your allergy and food intolerances and Lisa will gladly help you find some delicious foods to add to your diet.

Aaron - Lynn Auto Theater

           Watching a movie at a drive-in theater was always great fun.

   Few people would have seen more movies than Aaron Swank of Newcomerstown during the 1956-86 era. He was kept busy running the projector at some drive-in or movie theater every week. Since Aaron served as a relief operator, he worked in Newcomerstown, Newark, Coshocton, Mt. Vernon, and Cambridge for several different companies.

Aaron Projection Room

Operators of projectors could not leave the projection booth during the movie.

   When working, his job was to take care of all equipment at the theaters including projectors, wiring, and speakers at the drive-ins. Only members of the Alliance of Theatrical Stage Employees and Motion Picture Machine Operators were permitted operator responsibility. Knowing when and how to change the lens for different movies was very important.

Starlite Opening Night

Tickets were 44 cents for Opening Night at Starlite. Children under 12 were free!

   35 mm movie reels at that time were received in multiple canisters placed in one box. Since each roll was only 18 minutes long, there were usually five or six large rolls included for a movie. A two-minute warning was given the operator to change rolls so there would be no break in the movie. This consisted of a couple of circles in the upper right-hand corner. Sometimes today you can still see those in an old movie on television.

Aaron - Heath Opening Night

Heath Auto Theatre advertised “Don’t dress up.” “Smoke if you like.” “No Parking Worries.”

   After a reel was run, it then had to be rewound for showing the next evening or to be sent on to its next stop. Some were rewound by hand but later they used an automatic rewinder and then placed the reels in order in compartments for ease of using the following night. Once in a while his young daughter Betsy went to the movies with Dad and had the privilege of rewinding the films.

Aaron Cruise in

        Cruise-In Drive in near Cambridge was a favorite of area youngsters.

   After seeing all those films, it seemed only natural to ask Aaron about his favorites. At the top of his list were Westerns, especially those starring John Wayne and Randolph Scott. The Shootist, the last film Wayne starred in was a favorite.

Aaron - Heath Auto Theatre

                        Heath Auto Theatre could hold 600 cars.

   Drive-ins were popular spots and the Heath Auto Theatre was a favorite of Aaron’s. The projection booth was on top of the concession stand with a 465′ screen and room for 600 cars. When working the drive-ins, dust was always a major factor as the projector and film had to be kept clean to run smoothly. 

Aaron - Starlite Theater

Starlite Drive-in near Newcomerstown was one place Aaron showed many movies.

   Another favorite place to operate the projector was at Starlite Drive-in near Newcomerstown, which opened on June 24, 1949. Their projection room with the popular Brenkert Enarc projector was partially underground. They had a wooden screen tower with a canvas screen and could park 300 cars. A tornado hit town in 1955 and did considerable damage to the screen so a new cement block tower was built.

   Here you could see a movie for 44 cents and children under 12 were free. They continued to operate until the end of the season in 1986 when the screen was demolished. Now it is a housing development with Star Lite Drive running down its center.

Aaron-speaker

            Every car had its own speaker to put in the window.

   At the drive-in theaters, Betsy placed the speakers on the poles in the spring and helped take them off in the fall. Taking them off was a little dangerous as often wasps would make their nests in the speakers during the summer. Betsy said she undid the screw on the top with one hand and had a can of wasp spray in the other.

Aaron and Mary

Aaron was thankful to have Mary for a great supporting wife no matter what he attempted.

   Some evenings, his wife Mary, daughter Betsy and perhaps a friend would go along to the drive-in with him. They would bring along popcorn and kool-aid as they curled up on blankets in the back of their VW van.

Aaron - Teacher

Mr. Swank will be remembered for his years of teaching at Madison High School and Buckeye Vocational School.

   Many will remember Mr. Swank from his twenty-seven years of teaching history and political science at Madison High School and Buckeye Vocational School. Playing trombone in bands on the weekends gave him great pleasure also, especially the good times with the Rich Simcox Band.

Aaron Rich Simcox Band

Playing trombone in the Rich Simcox Band was one of his favorite weekend pasttimes.

   “I got to meet a lot of nice people I never would have met,” smiled Aaron. However, on his musical evenings, he had opportunity to meet Lyndon Johnson and Ronald Reagon. His students always enjoyed hearing of how Mr. Swank passed up by choice almost meeting two men who were to become president of the United States with a simple, “No.”

Aaron - Musical Night

          Aaron played trombone in several different bands on weekends.

   As you can tell, operating the projector at one of these theaters was a busy occupation. You had to stay in the booth the entire time in case there would be a break in the film, a ghost shadow, or another problem. Of course, the best nights were those when everything ran smoothly…but those didn’t happen very often.

Aaron - cider press

    A favorite fall hobby was making delicious apple cider in his own press.

You can still enjoy a drive-in movie close-by today at the Lynn Auto Theatre in Strasburg. They have two screens and great choices for your watching enjoyment. Come as you are in your family car!

Captain Bill at wheel

Captain Bill takes the wheel of the Lorena Sternwheeler.

When you’ve been a captain for thirty-five years, navigating the waters is something you do with ease no matter the situation. William Page, called Captain Bill by those who know him best, has surrounded himself with life on or near the water for most of his life.

Captain - child

That’s Bill on the right with a diving helmet his dad found in a Pittsburgh River.

   Growing up in Zanesville, he lived close to the Muskingum River and had many daring adventures there as a child while picking up coal along the railroad tracks. Riding a log jam down the river while fishing was one escapade that got him in trouble. Often he and his cousins would climb up under the bridges to catch pigeons – they wanted a carrier pigeon.

Captain - Aquatics Unlimited

Aquatics Unlimited in Zanesville was one of his first business ventures.

   Bill worked for Anchor Hocking Glass for 25 years as an engineering draftsman and mold maker. But the water was calling him and he opened Aquatics Unlimited in Zanesville. Here he designed and built swimming pools and spas, and taught scuba diving.

Captain - Swimming Pool

This swimming pool in Nashville, Tennessee was the last pool he constructed.

   Because of his diving abilities, he was a reserve deputy sheriff in Perry and Muskingum Counties. There he was active doing search and recovery dive team training and rescue missions.

Captain Diving

Giving scuba diving lessons was something Bill truly enjoyed.

   Then he took a vacation and fell in love with the waters of Florida. Soon he moved there, where he owned Knox Bait House Marina. When Bill decides to tackle a project, his persistence has always paid off. Since he had been a commercial diver, he decided to open a scuba diving center where he gave lessons on the Crystal River.

Captain - Manatee

Swimming with the manatee was a favorite Florida pastime.

   He set up a manatee training program at Crystal River because of their abundance at that location. His training program received international recognition. He fell in love with the manatees and enjoyed teaching people how to interact with these large aquatic mammals, who are very friendly when properly treated.

Captain Silver Suit 2

He was honored to wear the Silver Suit of Jacques Cousteau.

   While managing the Port Paradise Dive Center, he was in charge of everything from boat and diving equipment rentals to training divers and giving tours. This is where he was lucky enough to wear one of the famous silver suits of Jacques Cousteau who said, “The best way to observe a fish is to become one.” Bill understood how to do that.

Captain - Video Recorder

Bill still has the underwater video recorder that he used quite often.

   While in Florida, Bill’s life was filled with excitement. He worked at Walt Disney World with the dolphins, was part of the support team for a simulator space capsule with NASA, and directed scuba diving programs at the University of Florida and Bay Point Dive Center.

  There’s a special experience of freedom while diving. The feeling of weightlessness in the water and in the space capsule were pure delights for Bill. One special pleasure was diving to view all the colorful fish, especially at night when some give off a fluorescent glow. “We dive not to escape life but for life not to escape us.”

Captain - Yacht

Sailing his charter yacht Challenge led to many exciting trips in the Caribbean.

   In Florida, he received his captain’s license and took people on cruises from Ft. Lauderdale to the Caribbean. For three years he captained The Challenge, a 52′ charter sailing yacht.

   An old friend from Zanesville, Dorothy Montgomery, pulled some strings and asked him if he would come back and temporarily captain the Lorena. He had never operated a sternwheeler before but decided to accept the challenge. That was fifteen years ago.

Captain and Becky

Bill and his wife, Becky, share a passion for the waterways.

   Since then Captain Bill and his wife “Admiral” Becky, social director on the Lorena, have enjoyed the Muskingum River and the people who ride along with them. They hope to be back on board by the end of May each year.

Lorena Paddlewheel

Today Bill is Captain of the Lorena on the Muskingum River.

   While steering the Lorena, he notices his environment. In the sky, he sees many different birds, eagles and an occasional seagull. In the water, herring and other fish make themselves known but he quipped, “I haven’t seen an alligator, but I’m looking.”

   In his spare time, Bill drives tour buses and school buses for West Muskingum. He fills every hour of the day. If he would have one bit of advice for young people, it would be, “Education. Get it all.”

   Everyone has dreams and Bill is no exception. One dive he would still like to make is off the coast of Australia in the Great Barrier Reef, the world’s largest coral reef system.

Captain - Queen of the Lake II

His next project is to direct the restoration of the Queen of the Lake III at Buckeye Lake.

   His next project is fairly close to home as he has been asked to be project manager at Buckeye Lake as they complete the final steps on the restoration of Queen of the Lake III.

Captain at home

The Captain’s home office is filled with nautical memorabilia.

   There’s no doubt that Bill and Becky enjoy life to the fullest these days. Bill enjoys playing keyboard, guitar and accordion but never took a lesson. He’s one of those true musicians that play by ear. Today he’s perfectly happy to just relax in their beautiful home near Zanesville.

   Bill has seen things under the water that most have never seen. Memories float to the surface when he speaks of his adventures.

   “The sea, once it casts its spell, holds one in its net of wonders forever.”

~Jacques Cousteau

 

Surrounded by music since childhood, Jake “Barefoot” McCoy of Newark, Ohio now provides musical entertainment all over Ohio and across the United States. His popular folk music developed step by step throughout his life.


Barefoot as a child

Even as a child, Jake attempted to play his dad’s musical instruments.

   His family was homeschooled and piano instruction was part of the curriculum. At the age of five, he began classical piano lessons from a teacher who came to their house every week. A half-hour of practice was required daily.

   Jake feels lucky to have started his musical training at an early age. Music filled his heart and soul so by the time he was eight, he played as much by ear as by reading the music. It wasn’t until age 13 that Jake wrote his first songs using piano and guitar as accompaniment.

Barefoot at Apoxee Trail Florida

The Apoxee Trail in Florida is a great place to go hiking with your guitar.

   When attending Newark High School, Jake also participated in cross country and track. Running and being in nature got in his blood too, and he still gets pleasure from hiking today or taking long walks in the woods.

   Jake attended Asbury College in Kentucky for four years where he earned a degree in music and performance, with minors in accounting and agriculture. In that small town of Wilmore, locals met on the porches or in local clubs and enjoyed sharing music. That’s where he developed as a banjo player.

The same teddy bear is available in multiple, playful settings.

Historic Roscoe Village featured Jake at their grand piano for a Christmas concert.

   It was while enjoying music on those hot summer evenings along the Kentucky River that Jake began playing without wearing shoes. A couple of his friends, Rainwater, a Cherokee, and Gail Roe gave him the Indian name of “Barefoot” at that time and this unique name distinguishes him easily from other performers.

   While in Kentucky, he performed with many local bands from 2010 to 2014 and immersed himself in Appalachian culture, including readings of Thoreau and Wordsworth. If you listen closely, you can hear traces of his beliefs and values in the songs he writes.

Barefoot at South Florida Fair - West Palm Beach

Fairs are a popular venue. Here he performs at the South Florida State Fair in West Palm Beach.

   2015 created a memorable year for Barefoot as he went to California to visit a relative. He stayed the year playing every day as a street performer on the Santa Monica Pier. In the evenings he would play at local clubs and bars. While surrounded by all that music, he wrote over 100 songs that year.

   He began performing solo in 2015 and has since delighted crowds at over 1200 shows in Ohio, Kentucky, Pennsylvania, North Carolina, Florida, Indiana, New Mexico, and California. His most recent festival took place in March at Dawsonville, Georgia.

Barefoot April

Jake Barefoot McCoy writes meaningful lyrics for his folk songs.

   A special relative that influenced his music tremendously was Doc Watson. His folk guitar playing inspired much of Barefoot’s technique today. During the American folk music revival in the 1960s, the award-winning Doc played acoustic guitar and banjo with a special picking style.

   A multi-talented young man, Barefoot is a singer, songwriter, and musician. A specialty he has mastered is putting poetic lyrics together that tell stories of yesterday and tomorrow. Barefoot is a truly great lyricist able to capture beauty, happiness, frustrations, and pure fun.

Barefoot at Keyboard

The keyboard is a central part of his performances.

   He varies his performances by playing guitar, banjo, harmonica, and piano. No matter what instrument he picks up, his skill and feelings come pouring through. Those bare feet keep him in close touch with his foot percussion, which is often his guitar case.

Barefoot at Cherokee, NC

Cherokee Nation in North Carolina has a festival that he thoroughly enjoys.

   While playing around on the piano at home, he often just happens across his next song. He loves telling a story through his music and usually is working on several new songs. Sometimes he might work on a song idea for years, but often it happens in just one day, maybe even ten minutes.

Barefoot Latest Album

His album “Back to Virginia” takes you on a musical adventure from valleys to mountaintops.

   His albums are Bye Bye Bluebird, Ballyhoo, American Lady, and Back to Virginia. At concerts, Take Me Away and Cali top the list of requests. Summer in My Soul is his latest hit.

I will not grow old

While my heart is full

The world outside is so cold

But it’s Summer in My Soul.

Tourism Barefoot McCoy

He was a featured entertainer at Ohio Tourism Day on the Ohio Statehouse steps.

   Some of his favorite concerts have occurred at the Cherokee Festival in Cherokee Nation, the Paul Bunyan Festival at Old Washington, and Apple Butter Festival in Coshocton. My first concert of Barefoot’s occurred on the Ohio State House Lawn at a State Tourism Show and later listened when he performed at the Guernsey County Senior Center Picnic.

Barefoot at Senior Diner

Guernsey County Senior Center asked him to play for their Senior Picnic in the park.

   Like all young men, he has his dreams. One of those would be to go on an international tour. He’d also enjoy playing with Tommy Emmanuel, who he admires for his complex fingerstyle technique on the guitar. The talented Jake “Barefoot” McCoy certainly has a wonderful chance to fulfill his dreams.

Barefoot Tee

This Barefoot tee shirt could be a fun gift.

   Visit his website at www.barefootmccoy.com to hear some of his music. It’s an easy place to order an entertaining CD. Bluegrass fans might like to pick up a Barefoot Raglan Tee Shirt or Hoodie for themselves or a friend.

   Watch his schedule and plan to listen to his delightful musical creations sometime soon. Barefoot McCoy is a pure American Folk Music treasure.

Fort Laurens Entrance

Fort Laurens is in Bolivar Ohio just minutes off I-77.

   Add a little history to your summer fun by visiting Fort Laurens near Bolivar. A Revolutionary War fort was built in Ohio back in 1778 by General Lachlan McIntosh on the banks of the Tuscarawas River. Fort Laurens was the only Revolutionary War fort built in the Ohio Country by the Continental Congress.

Fort Laurens Original Fort

This drawing captures the design of the original fort.

   Fort Laurens was named after Henry Laurens, the fifth president of the Continental Congress. The Americans built Fort Laurens with three purposes in mind.

Fort Laurens rifleman

Riflemen dressed in linen shirt and overalls helped build Fort Laurens.

   First, they hoped to use it as a base to attack the British garrison at Detroit Second, they hoped it would keep the American Indians, who were loyal to the British, from conducting raids against American settlers in eastern Ohio and western Pennsylvania. Finally, by offering protection to the neutral Christian Delawares, the Americans might convince them to forsake their neutrality and join the patriots’ cause.

Fort Laurens Men suffering in winter

That cold winter, men suffered at Fort Laurens in cold huts with little food.

   However, conditions were so cold during that first winter that most of the men were moved to Fort Pitt. Learning of the terrible conditions inside the fort, the British and a couple of hundred Indian warriors laid siege to the fort. The men inside the fort were reportedly reduced to making a soup broth of boiled moccasins. Two men snuck out and returned with a deer carcass. It is said that the men were so hungry they ate it raw.

   General Brodhead reported to General George Washington that the fort was too far from Detroit to stage an attack and not close enough to the Delaware Indians to offer protection. General Washington ordered the fort abandoned in August 1779.

Fort Laurens Picnic Shelters

Picnic shelters provide a great place for family gatherings.

   In July of 1887, Christian L Baatz visited the fort and became interested in preserving its history. Baazt with his friends Ed Pease and William Lowe became acquainted with landowner David Gibler. David and his brother had leveled the fort in 1853 for farming. 

   After much promotion on their part, in 1908 Ohio Archaeologists and Historical Society indicated they would like to purchase the land and create a state park. DAR and SAR also wanted to preserve the location for historical purposes.

Fort Laurens School Group

School groups participate in demonstrations to learn more about the history of our country.

   When nothing had been done for several years by these three organizations, Baazt, Pease, and Lowe drew up a petition to gather signatures to present to the Ohio State Legislature to create a proper memorial on the site. In 1915, legislation was passed to preserve the Fort Laurens site.

   It had only served as a fort for one year before it was abandoned in 1779. Part of the fort was destroyed during the building of the Ohio and Erie Canal. None of the original fort remains above ground, but the outline of the fort is still highly visible. The Ohio and Erie Canal Towpath Trail, an 80-mile long recreational trail, goes through the site today.

Fort Laurens Museum

The outline of the original fort can be seen in the vicinity of the museum.

   A museum tells the story of soldiers on the frontier. There is an informative video that you won’t want to miss telling the fort’s history. A display of archaeological items discovered during excavation is displayed in the museum.

Fort Laurens soldiers guarding tomb

Uniformed soldiers were present at the dedication of the Tomb of the Unknown Patriot.

   There is a Tomb of the Unknown Patriot of the American Revolution paying tribute to the unknown defenders of the fort. In 1976, the year of the bicentennial of the American Revolution, a special military ceremony was held to bury the remains of the first soldier excavated in 1973. Twenty-one men lost their lives there in the year it served as a fort and the remains of some of those men are in a crypt in the museum wall. 

Fort Laurens crypt

This crypt in the museum wall contains the remains of some of the men who lost their lives here.

   Events are held here throughout the year from February through December. Check their website for up-to-date events at www.fortlaurens.org . Almost every month they have an interesting speaker. In July, they will be talking about “Women of the Revolution” presented by Sharon Snowden of Ohio First Ladies Museum.

Fort Laurens Reenactment

Reenactments bring to life the conflict of Revolutionary War days.

   Revolution on the Tuscarawas: Revolutionary War Encampment and Reenactment takes place on July 18-19. Explore British and Continental camps to meet soldiers from both sides of the conflict. Children can enjoy musket drills, colonial America games and crafts throughout the day. Tickets must be purchased ahead of time for this event.

Fort Laurens Towpath Trail

This shady Towpath Trailhead leads to the Ohio & Erie Canal after a walk through an enclosed walkway over the interstate.

   Today Fort Laurens is managed by the Zoar Community Association and remains a special memorial to those who died during the Revolutionary War. While there, bring a picnic and enjoy a relaxing walk on The Ohio and Erie Canal Towpath Trail. The trail goes through a shady woods before crossing the interstate on an enclosed walkway. On the other side is part of that original Ohio and Erie Canal. You can walk the three miles to Zoar Village on the towpath trail if you have the time and energy.

   Add history to your summer adventures!

Fort Laurens is easy to reach off I-77 in Ohio. Take exit 93 for OH-212 W, then turn left on Mulberry Steet. Fort Laurens is on the left hand side. There is no admission fee to the grounds but a small fee for the museum.

Flags- Sign on Door

This sign appears on all doorways at Annin Flagmakers.

Annin Flagmakers have been making the flag of our country since 1847. The sixth generation of this family now owns and operates the business. Here workers make over three and a half million 4’x6′ flags each year in addition to many other sizes, including stick flags.

   Alexander Annin had been making flags for merchant ships on the waterfront in New York City for several years before beginning Annin Flags in Lower Manhattan on what was called “Old Glory Corner”. Eventually, headquarters was moved to New Jersey with factories in Coshocton, Ohio and South Boston, Virginia.

Flags Headquarters

One branch of Annin Flagmakers remains in Coshocton.

   These flags are Made in America of the highest standards by experienced flag makers. They have learned what long-lasting domestically made fabrics to use and what inks hold their color the longest. Fabrics include everything from nylon and cotton to polyester, with nylon holding up best outside.

Flags - workplace

This view greets your eyes upon entering the work area.

   State, military, national and international flags are made by Annin. However, the Coshocton facility basically makes US flags with a specialty now and then. When visiting, they were also making golf pin flags.

   Local history shows that the Coshocton branch of Annin Flagmakers was started by a family from Newcomerstown in 1968. Vane and Barbara Scott had been in the business of decorating floats for parades all over the country but were ready to settle down back home.

Vane Scott First Flag

Eugene and Francis Waller with owners, Barb and Vane Scott, proudly display the first flag made by Colonial Flag Company in 1968.

   A man with a flagpole company suggested they bid on a contract for 10,000 American flags…and they won! They purchased six sewing machines and a strip cutter to cut the stripes. That was the beginning of Colonial Flag Co. By 1970, they had moved their business to a larger building in Coshocton.

   When the 1976 bicentennial rolled around, Colonial Flag Co. had difficulty keeping up with orders so decided to sell the company. There were two stipulations to the sale: keep the business in Coshocton and keep Vane and Barbara on as managers. Annin Flagmakers purchased the business at that time. The reason there is a flag company in Coshocton today is due to the determination of the Scott family to keep jobs locally.

   Vane and Barb served as plant managers of Annin Flagmakers in Coshocton until 1991. Then Vane III, or Bud as he is often called, served as manager until 2002 when he retired.

Flags- rolls of stick flags

These rolls of stick flags are ready to be processed.

   Over the years, Annin has made flags for many important national events including:

  • 1849 – Inauguration of Zachary Taylor as President
  • 1851 – Queen Victoria’s Great Exhibit in London
  • 1860 – All wartime flags for the Civil War
  • 1969 – NASA’s Apollo II mission to the moon.

flags-dave-manager.jpg

Dave Rogers, DIrector of Operations, is proud to be part of Annin Flagmakers.

   At Annin Flagmakers headquarters, I had a chance to talk with Dave Rogers, Director of Operations, and learn a little more about the way flags are made today. They employ 150 people full-time and also hire temporary workers during their busiest season. Everyone wants the flags to be in their stores for Memorial Day weekend and the Fourth of July.

Flags - Strips being cut

The digital fabric cutter is prepared to cut white stripes for the flag.

   One popular flag is a 3’x5′ sewn nylon flag. They make around 35,000 of them each week. One of the first tasks is to cut the large rolls of fabric into stripes and place them in rolls of various colors. They can cut up to six different sizes at one time on their digital fabric cutter.

Flags- cakes of color strips

The colored stripes are then placed into rolls before heading to the seamstress.

Flags- adding the field of blue

Janet, a 22-year employee, adds the field of blue to the stripes.

   The stripes are then sewn together with six long stripes and seven short stripes. Once they are together, the field of blue is added. Star Field prepares the embroidered star field where the polished white thread gives sparkle to the stars on the field of blue.

Flags- cutting the edges

A 25-year employee, Anita, makes the edges straight.

   These workers take pride in their product. Three of the ladies together had in 88 years at Annin so worked with speed and precision. Everything has to be perfectly straight and their quadruple-stitched fly hem makes them extra durable.

Flags - Memorial Wall

Their lobby displays flags that were brought back after foreign service.

   When a local young man or woman went off to the war in Iraq, Annin gave them two flags. They asked them to return one flag telling where they had taken it, and the other was for their personal use. A display in the lobby shows several of those flags that were returned to Annin.

Flags - Ohio Visitors Bureau

Get your flag locally at the Coshocton Visitors Bureau in Roscoe Village.

   You can find Annin Flags at the Coshocton Visitors Bureau in Roscoe Village, Walmart, Target, Krogers and many other places. The friendly staff at the Visitors Bureau will take special orders for you and show you the large selection available there.

Flags- Walmart display

This display of Annin Flags is ready to ship to Walmart.

   Show your pride in America by displaying its flag and honoring it with a flag made right here in the U.S.A.

Oh say, does that star-spangled banner yet wave,

O’er the land of the free and the home of the brave.

~Francis Scott Key The Star-Spangled Banner

Dad, Mom and Bev 001

Mom, Dad, and a shy gypsy enjoy Father’s Day long ago. 

Dad would truly “Walk a mile for a Camel.” He thoroughly enjoyed his Camel cigarettes. No other brand would do. Why at that time their advertisements stated, “More doctors smoke Camels than any other cigarette.” Purchases were made by the carton.

   Needless to say, Dad always knew how many packs of cigarettes he still had left. One day when Dad and Mom returned from town, he found some of his packs of cigarettes missing. Mom questioned him as to whether he had smoked more than he thought. “No, Kate, I didn’t smoke that many packs. Someone had to take some.”

   Two weeks later, the same thing happened. This time they noticed that someone had come in through the cellar door while they were gone as the door was still wide open.

   Then Dad decided to play detective. He sent Mom to town at the regular time with me, wearing his work hat and white shirt, driving their car. We headed down the road to Indian Camp as we didn’t plan on staying away too long just in case Dad needed help.

   Before long, Dad heard someone pushing open the cellar door. Now was his chance to see who had been taking his cigarettes. He patiently waited at the top of the steps as he heard what sounded like young laughter.

   When the door to the upstairs opened, there stood Dad to greet the intruders. They happened to be two neighbor boys who wanted something to smoke and of course, their parents would not permit that.

   How surprised they were! He told them to come on upstairs and sit down in the living room. “Well, boys, should I call your parents? Will they approve of what you have done? You both know that stealing is wrong.”

   “Oh, please, Rudy, don’t call them. We’ll be in big trouble. We promise never to take your cigarettes again if you don’t tell.”

   Then Dad surprised them both by saying, “It will be our secret. If you ever want to smoke a cigarette, come over and ask me for one.”

   When Mom and I came back to the house, Dad was sitting on the porch with a smile on his face. “I caught two young boys and taught them a lesson. I don’t think it will ever happen again.” He was hoping that might cure their desire to take things that didn’t belong to them…and it did!

Topiary - Old Deaf School Park

Topiary Park is located on the grounds of Old Deaf School Park in Columbus, Ohio.

Walk through the Topiary Garden on Town Street near downtown Columbus, Ohio as you let your imagination take you to “A Sunday Afternoon on the Island of La Grande Jatte.” This painting inspired Columbus artists James T. Mason and his wife, Elaine to develop a living reinterpretation of that painting on the grounds of the Old Deaf School Park.

Topiary - Painting Print

“A Sunday Afternoon on the Island of La Grande Jatte” inspired this Topiary Garden.

   Georges-Pierre Seurat was a French painter (1859-1891) and this painting on a ten-foot canvas is considered to be one of the most remarkable paintings of the 19th century. The painting took him two years to complete as he first focused on the park itself before painting people from every social class participating in park activities. No figure encroaches on another’s space. All coexist in peace.

Topiary - Relaxing under the tree

This topiary couple relaxes in the shade while reading a book.

   Topiary is the practice of clipping plants into shapes. James shaped the bronze frames and planted the greenery, while Elaine served as the original topiarist. This small garden was developed with the help of the Columbus Recreation and Parks Department. They pay attention year-round to keeping the plants trimmed and in excellent condition around their wire framework.

   This area actually dates back to 1829 when the Ohio School for the Deaf established educational and residential programs for school-age children who were deaf or hard of hearing. By 1953, the school had outgrown its downtown location and moved to a larger property on Morse Road. Today, the Topiary Garden on those old grounds is the only one of its kind in the world – a park based entirely on the interpretation of one painting.

Topiary - Rowboat on the water

There are eight topiary boats on the pond, which represents the River Seine.

   This was all originally built for the opening of the AmeriFlora exhibit that took place in Columbus in 1992. Special care has been used to create close representations of the painting by Georges Seurat in 1884. The pond represents the River Seine and was developed in the early stages of the garden in 1989. There are even artificial hills that help capture the scene.

Topiary Gift Shop

The gatehouse, resembling a French countryside home, holds their gift shop and information center.

   The gatehouse resembles a French country house to match the park’s theme. Here you will find an information center, museum and gift shop. It is located next to a library which has an outstanding art exhibit.

Topiary - Lady reading outside gift shop

Outside the gatehouse, this topiary lady sits reading a book.

   Highlighted are the sculpted topiaries, hedges trimmed into the shapes of men, women, children, boats, and animals. The frames that support the figures are made of 5/8-inch bronze and set in eighteen inches of concrete.

Topiary - Man with tophat

A man with a top hat is one of 54 topiary characters in the scene.

   There are actually 54 people, eight boats, three dogs, a cat, and a monkey included in the carvings. The largest topiary is 12′ tall. You might see a man with a top hat or a lady with her parasol dressed in the fashion of the 1800s, watching the topiary boats on the pond.

Topiary Bronze

This bronze plaque is situated at the artist’s viewpoint, “As He Saw It.”

   Visit the spot called “As He Saw It” for the exact location of the scene Seurat saw as he was painting it. There is a bronze plaque at this spot so you can compare the topiary to the painting. It’s a quiet place in the middle of the city where you can leisurely wander through the garden and become part of the painting or sit and relax in its tranquil setting.

Topiary - View of painter

This view matches the actual Seurat painting completed in topiaries.

   This garden has been showcased around the world in magazines, periodicals, books, and documentaries. Articles have been found in Life, National Geographic, and The Wall Street Journal.

Topiary - Lady with Monkey and Umbrella

This lady with her monkey is very popular with the children.

   The Topiary Garden Park, situated on seven acres, is open daily from dawn till dusk, and admission is free! Metered parking is just outside the fence. While the Topiary Park is only a couple of acres, the remainder of the area has many scattered picnic tables and benches where families gather.

   A Sunday afternoon spent at Topiary Garden Park is just as relaxing as a visit to The Island of La Grande Jatte. Enjoy the beauty of nature in downtown Columbus.

Topiary Park is located at 480 E. Town Street in downtown Columbus, Ohio. There are parking meters just outside the main gate,

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