Places to go and things to see by Gypsy Bev

Archive for the ‘Museums’ Category

Founder of Piggly Wiggly Built Pink Palace

Piggly Wiggly pink palace

The Pink Palace was built in the 1920s by Clarence Saunders, founder of Piggly Wiggly.

   If you want to impress your friends and neighbors, building a pink marble palace might be one possibility. That is what Clarence Saunders decided to do back in the 1920s.

Piggly Wiggly trucks

Piggly Wiggly had their own delivery trucks.

   Clarence Saunders began working in Owen’s general store at the age of ten by cleaning, oiling, and trimming the kerosene lamps. When he was fourteen,  Owens hired him permanently at a salary of $4 per month plus room and board. A few years later, he received a job at another general store for $10 a month and worked there until he was 17.

Piggly Wiggly store

This is a replica of the interior of an original Piggly Wiggly.

   After working in the general store all those years, Saunders thought of ways to make it more customer-friendly. As a result, Saunders became the founder and sole owner of a new kind of general store. He wanted his store to be unique so named it Piggly Wiggly.

Piggly Wiggly Soup display

You could pick a can off the shelf all by yourself.

   This was the first true self-service grocery store. Previously, the clerk in the store retrieved the items for the buyer and brought them to the counter.  Now, the buyer entered through a turnstile and went down the aisles picking up the things they wanted and brought them to the counter to check out their total price.  By  1921, he had 615 grocery stores in forty states and many more franchises.

Piggly Wiggly Saunders

Clarence Saunders founded Piggly Wiggly.

   Saunders chose to use the fortune he had amassed through Wall Street stock to build a lovely home in Memphis, Tennessee. He purchased 155 acres across the street from the Memphis Country Club. He called his new home Cla-Le-Clare to honor his children Clay, Lee, and Amy Clare.  Since it was being built of pink Georgia marble, the Memphians called it the Pink Palace.

Pink Palace lobby

The Grand Lobby contains restored Burton Callicott murals.

   Sadly, his good fortune on Wall Street did not last. With only the exterior of the house finished, it was sold at public auction in 1925 and plans were to demolish it. However, the Garden Corporation stepped in and had the palace donated to the city with hopes of turning it into a museum.

Pink Palace star

Early controls for their planetarium are on display.

   A group of high school boys formed the Memphis Astronomical Society in 1953. They gathered weekly to look at the stars from the lawn. The city wanted to construct a planetarium and it was finally decided to put it in the Pink Palace. Due to a lack of funds, the high school boys ran the planetarium on the weekends for many years.

Pink Palace shows

Interesting films are shown on a large 3-D screen.

   The Mansion Theater has shows running throughout the day on a large 3-D screen. When visiting, the Dinosaur movie projected creatures flying into the audience and walking close by. Apollo II was to be shown later in the day.

Pink Palace General Store

Take a walk through an old general store where you were waited on personally.

   Explore an old general store like Clarence worked in as a boy. Then visit his first Piggly Wiggly store and see the improvements. His advertisement contained stories like these:

   A customer wants 5 pounds of granulated sugar put up in a cloth bag. She is in a hurry so she runs into Piggly Wiggly and helps herself. She pays the cashier and away she goes.

Piggly Wiggly circus

Enjoy a moving miniature circus in the Clyde Parke Circus Gallery.

   Upstairs the Clyde Parke Miniature Circus filled an entire room. This is a 3D model of a real circus done to 1:12 scale. Parke carved each of the figures from white pine he salvaged from packing crates. There are animals, clowns, a lady on a trapeze, and an audience of 1500 people. He donated the circus so people would remember “when the circus was the biggest show in town.”

Piggly Wiggly bear

This polar bear attracts plenty of attention.

   A large male polar bear from Alaska was donated to the museum forty years ago for educational purposes by Dr. Harold Misner. The bear has been a popular presence at many weddings in the Pink Palace. When the Memphis Grizzlies make the playoffs, he is lit with blue lights.

   The Pink Palace captures the history of not only Piggly Wiggly but that of early natural history in “A Walk Through Time” and the history of the early days of the South. Take time to visit their theater, have lunch at Metro Eats, and take home a memory from the Museum Store.

   “There’s Lively Learning for All at Pink Palace Museum.”

The Pink Palace is located at 3050 Central Avenue, Memphis TN. Your GPS should come in handy to find this location.

 

 

 

The Ark Encounter – Bigger Than Your Imagination

Ark Encounter

Visitors are in awe at the immense size of the Ark.

Awesome! That word was frequently used by visitors to describe their first impression of The Ark Encounter. Its size impresses everyone.

Ark Entrance Garden

Beautiful gardens appear throughout the grounds.

   The Ark Encounter fills the area. Noah’s Ark was much larger than most people realize. At 510 feet long, 51 feet high, and 85 feet wide, the numbers can’t really express the size of this immense biblical ship.

   Situated in Williamstown, Kentucky halfway between Cincinnati and Lexington, Ark Encounter is the largest timber-frame structure in the world. It was built in part by skilled Amish craftsmen from standing dead timber and opened in 2016. Since that time, hundreds of thousands of people have visited and up to 8000 in a day.

Ark Founder

Ken Ham is president and founder of the Ark Encounter and Creation Museum.

   This all became possible due to a dream of Ken Ham, a science teacher from Australia. His desire was to found a Creation Museum based on the book of Genesis. In 1987, he moved his family to the United States to proclaim the accuracy of the scriptures. He came to the Cincinnati area in 1997 because of its location to a large portion of the country’s population and purchased the land in 2000. He formed the group Answers in Genesis and opened the Creation Museum in 2007. In 2010, the decision was made to build the Ark Encounter.

Ark Bus

Bus transportation is provided between the parking lot and the Ark location.

   Friendly guides take people by bus from the entrance gate to the Answer Center. Here films about the Ark are shown throughout the day. “The Building of the Ark Encounter” provided an interesting view.

Ark Rainbow Gardens

The Rainbow Gardens are near the entrance to the zoo.

   Then walk through sidewalks lined with beautiful flower gardens to arrive at the actual entrance to the Ark. As you exit the ark, there are Rainbow Gardens, which make you feel like you’re visiting a tropical paradise.

Ark Kitchen

Meals were prepared in this possible kitchen area for Noah and his family.

Ark Garden

They grew vegetables on board and followed a vegan diet.

   Drift back in time to meet Noah in his 600th year and his seven family members, who lived on the Ark and cared for all the animals during the Flood. Visit all three decks to learn more about the story.

Ark Noah

Noah answers interesting questions from a select list.

Ark Blacksmith

A son took care of the blacksmith’s repair chores.

   Look in their living quarters on deck three and see what they probably looked like. Find out how they cooked their food, where they slept, how they gardened, and what they did for fun. Here you can press questions for Noah to answer about their life.

Ark water jugs and bags of grain

The first deck contained water jugs and bags of grain to feed the animals.

Ark Giraffe cages

Rows of cages contained the animals on the second deck of the Ark.

   Of course, you’ll want to meet the animals that were on the Ark to see what lived during that time. Learn what Noah and his sons fed the animals and how they fit them all on the Ark. Onboard the Ark, you’ll find exotic sculpted animals. When you exit, you’ll find live animals in their Ararat Ridge Zoo.

Ark Zoo Entrance

Enter these gates to view the Ararat Ridge Zoo.

   The petting zoo is a favorite of children and adults. A special kangaroo pen lets visitors have a close encounter with the roos. Make plans to see the Ararat Ridge Zoo earlier in the day as when 5:00 feeding time rolls around, the animals all disappear inside for their evening meal.

Ark Kangaroos

The kangaroo pen allowed visitors to come inside and pet the roos…if they were on the sidewalk.

Ark Emus

The emus paced their cage area and watched visitors.

   Visiting the entire establishment will take at least three or four hours. Some people come back for a second day as there is so much to see. Stop by Emzara’s Buffet for a relaxing full meal or get some snacks of ice cream, pizza, or funnel cakes in the Village Market. Parents can relax while children enjoy an exceptionally nice playground.

Ark Zip Line

Try the Screaming Eagle Zip Line for a fun adventure.

   They even have a Screaming Eagle Zip Line with speeds of 50 mph for the adventurous. Try a free fall jump or test your balance on the aerial adventure course. There’s something here for everyone.

Ark Bow

The visitors in this picture give a good size comparison to the bow of the Ark.

   Set on 800 acres in western Kentucky, they have a lot of room to grow. Plans are already underway for the Tower of Babel and a Giraffe Safari.

   The Ark Encounter is a great Biblical adventure for the entire family.

The Ark Encounter is located in Williamstown, Kentucky west of Exit 154 off I-75.  It is approximately 40 miles south of Cincinnati, Ohio. 

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s that lived during Noah’s lifetime animals we see today. 

Historic Roscoe Village – America’s Canal Town

We Bring History to Life

Roscoe Visitor Center

Roscoe Village Visitors Center is the perfect place to begin your tour.

Welcome to yesterday! Life 200 years ago was quite different from what we experience today. While we can’t turn the clocks back to that era, we can visit Roscoe Village in Coshocton to catch a glimpse of life on the Ohio and Erie Canal during that time.

Roscoe Oldest House

Weaver Daniel Boyd, his wife, and four children lived in the oldest house in the village from 1825-1835.

   Back in 1816, James Calder laid out the port town that was to become Roscoe. He followed a hunch that farmers would rather do business at Calder’s General Store along the Muskingum River than pay twenty-five cents to take the ferryboat to Coshocton.

   He named the town Caldersburgh, but it was later renamed Roscoe, in honor of William Roscoe, an English historian and leading abolitionist. Roscoe never visited America and probably never knew he had a town named after him.

Roscoe Ohio Erie Canal

Enjoy a smooth horse-drawn canal boat ride on the Ohio-Erie Canal.

   When the Ohio and Erie Canal was constructed in the 1820s, business in the village expanded and the golden age of Roscoe began. The first canal boat, the Monticello, landed at Roscoe on August 21, 1830. Roscoe was one of the largest wheat ports along the 350-mile canal that went from Lake Erie to the Ohio River.

Roscoe weaver

Rami demonstrated weaving techniques on her 200- year-old American Barn Loom.

   Roscoe thrived until the 1860s when the canals gave way to railroads. The canal boats continued to operate on a smaller scale until the disastrous flood of 1913, which swept away the port of Roscoe.

Roscoe One Room School

Natalie, the schoolmarm, told about teaching in a one-room school.

   Today the restored Roscoe Village is a reminder of Ohio’s canal era thanks to the dedication of prominent Coshocton industrialist, Edward Montgomery and his wife, Frances. A painting, “Canal Days”, which depicts the Roscoe area and can still be seen in the Chase Bank building at 120 S. Fourth Street, captured the imagination of the Montgomerys.

Roscoe Toll House

The Toll House is the restored home of James Welsh, toll collector on the canal.

   Their role began back in 1961 when they purchased the 1840 Toll House and decided to create “a living museum” on the banks of the Muskingum River. They endeavored to revive, restore and reclaim the then-burgeoning port town to a time when the Ohio and Erie Canal bustled with boats and barges.

Roscoe Dr. Dee

Dr. Dee in Dr. Johnson’s Office explained the tonsil guillotine.

   When you visit Roscoe Village today, you can stroll through the gardens, visit their many historic buildings, and take a horse-drawn canal boat ride on a portion of that old Ohio and Erie Canal. You’ll feel like you’re living a chapter of American history.

Roscoe Hotel

The Roscoe Hotel was a canal era hotel used as a stagecoach stop.

   Begin your tour at the Visitors’ Center where you can view a film, “Ditches of Destiny”, which describes those early days on the Ohio and Erie Canal. Then take a self-guided tour of the village to see costumed interpreters in historic buildings describing what life was like in those old canal days. Stop at the restored 19th-century buildings, which house The Famous Shops of Roscoe Village. Most businesses are open seven days a week throughout the year.

Roscoe Johnson Humrickhouse Museum

Learn more local history at the Johnson-Humerickhouse Museum. Yes, that’s Bigfoot in the shadows.

   Don’t forget to visit the Johnson-Humrickhouse Museum where you will learn interesting facts about Ohio history. Here displays tell you stories of the American Indians, Ohio artifacts, and Decorative Arts. There’s also a wonderful collection of East Asian artifacts that were collected by the owner.

Roscoe Blacksmith

Carl, the village smithy, made leaf hooks as a blacksmith demonstration.

   Stroll through the Gardens that Frances Montgomery lovingly left for visitors to enjoy. Meander down its paths to see the beautiful blossoms and herbs that have been popular for ages. Beauty blooms in the gardens every season of the year.

   A ride down the Ohio and Erie Canal is the smoothest ride you can imagine drawn by two strong horses on the towpath. You’ll hear stories of how people traveled the canal in those early days. Some are quite unusual and exciting.

Roscoe Doctor's house and office

Stroll the streets of this quiet village any time of the year.

   Stop by Roscoe Village this summer and join in their 45th Anniversary. We need to remember the history of our area and how those early settlers developed a foundation for the world we live in today.

   Perhaps Captain P. R. Nye, who operated a canal boat at Roscoe’s Lock Twenty-Seven, says it best: “The Silver Ribbon – the Ohio Canal – was the best of life a man ever had.”

Historic Roscoe Village is located at 600 N Whitewoman Street in Coshocton, Ohio. From I-77, take exit 65, which is US-36 W. Follow 35 West to Whitewoman Street approximately 18 miles. It will be on the right-hand side of the road.

Baseball Legend Cy Young Called Tuscarawas County Home

Cy Welcome to Museum

This photo with Cy’s old rocking chair welcomes you to the Olde Main Street Museum.

Baseball, Hot Dogs, Apple Pie and Chevrolet. Those are things that are American to the core. In the nearby town of Newcomerstown, a baseball legend grew up and his legacy is still celebrated today.

  Denton True Young was born in Gilmore, not far from Newcomerstown. Called Dent as a youngster, the lad went to a two-room school in Gilmore but only went through the sixth grade. The boys loved to play baseball and would often either walk or ride horseback for twenty miles to play the game.

   To practice pitching, Dent would throw a ball (if he had one) into a target on the barn door, or walnuts through the knot holes in the fence. It’s no wonder he was known for accuracy during his pitching career.

Cy ball and glove

Cy’s glove holds a baseball marked 1897 – Cleveland…the date he pitched his first no-hitter against the Cincinnati Reds.

   Dent received his first contract from a team in Canton at the age of 23. They paid him $60 a month. Wanting to impress his teammates, he threw the ball so hard that no catcher wanted to catch him, so he threw into the fence. One fellow said it looked like a cyclone had struck the fence. The name stuck and Cyclone was his listed name for two years. That soon became shortened to Cy, a name which stayed with him through the rest of his life.

Cy Indians program

This old Indians scorecard only cost a dime.

   Over the years, he played with Cleveland, St. Louis, and Boston. He holds the records of most innings pitched at 7,356 and most wins with 511, a record that is not likely to be broken. Not many could pitch like he did in both games of a double header…and he never had a sore arm!

Cy - 1892 Scrapbook

His personal 1892 scrapbook is on display at the museum.

   In 1914, a young man in Newcomerstown by the name of Jimmie Knowles had a shoeshine stand in front of the newspaper office. He remembers Cy Young coming to town almost every weekend in his big Cadillac and parking it on Main Street. Then he’d stop by and have Jimmie polish his shoes. He always left a tip.

Cy - Trophies

This framed photo shows Cy with his many trophies.

   Cy tried his hand at management for one year with the Cleveland Green Socks as he had a hankering to get back into the world of baseball. But the league was dissolved and Cy returned to Tuscarawas County.

   When Cy retired at the age of 45, he enjoyed the life of a gentleman farmer in Peoli. There he raised potatoes, and tended sheep, hogs, and chickens and enjoyed hunting and fishing.

Cy - ax and wood he chopped

This ax belonged to Cy Young and it is said this is some of the last wood he chopped.

   When his wife, Roba, died in 1933, Cy lost a good friend as they had known each other since childhood. After her death, he worked at various jobs and eventually moved in with friends and helped them bale hay, handle the horse and even chop wood.

   He was an active member of the community and moved up through the ranks of the Masons, was a member of the local Elks Club and was elected to the Republican Party Central Committee.

   Old-timers baseball games gave him pleasure and a chance to meet old friends. In 1937, Cy Young was voted into the Baseball Hall of Fame in the second class ever. He was the first to donate memorabilia to their new museum in Cooperstown.

Cy - Showcase

Several showcases at Olde Main Street Museum contain Cy Young memorabilia.

   In 1948, great excitement filled Newcomerstown as Cy Young was to be honored at Cleveland Stadium for his 80th birthday. To make the day even more special, Bill Veeck, the owner of the Cleveland Indians, arranged for the C&M Railroad to make a stop in Newcomerstown and bring the whole town to Cleveland at no cost to residents.

   Pitching was Cy’s specialty and he threw a fastball with cannonball speed that few could hit. Because of his fantastic pitching ability, the Cy Young Award was created in 1956 and given annually to an outstanding pitcher in all of baseball. Beginning in 1967 through today, the award is given to a pitcher in each league.

Cy - Cy Young Park

The Cy Young Park in Newcomerstown remembers one of baseball’s original legends.

   The first Cy Young Festival was held in 1958 in Newcomerstown. Every year a baseball star pitcher is featured. This year it will be Randy Jones, who won the Cy Young Award in 1978 when he played for the San Diego Padres. Great names such as Dwight Gooden, Dean Chance, and Vida Blue have attended the festival.

Cy- Tombstone

Fans visit his Peoli tombstone to leave baseballs and other memorabilia.

   The festival begins on Saturday morning with a Cy Young Run. Afterward, a car caravan can be seen heading to Cy’s grave in nearby Peoli at the Peoli Church. You might stop along the way at the Newcomerstown McDonald’s where they have a large display honored this hometown hero.

Cy - McDonald's

Stop by Newcomerstown McDonald’s for wall displays about this local hero.

   The afternoon is filled with bands, food, and fun for everyone. The annual parade begins at 6:00 and stops at the Olde Main Street Museum. There they have a special display of Cy Young memorabilia.

Cy - Olde Main Street Museum

Cy’s memorabilia can be seen at the Olde Main Street Museum in Newcomerstown.

   Sunday begins with an Old Timers Vintage Baseball game at the Cy Young Memorial Park Field. Players will be dressed in uniforms similar to those of the mid-1800s and use the same rules and language of the Civil War era. Or you might prefer to go to a Car Show on Main Street, a talent show or pet show. There are events for everyone to enjoy.

Cy - 1 953 Little League Opening

He appeared at the Newcomerstown 1953 Little League Opening where he encouraged youngsters to play ball.

   The Annual Cy Young Days Festival is held in Newcomerstown in June of each year. The festival not only promotes Cy Young but also increases awareness of all the youth baseball and softball programs in the Newcomerstown area. It’s all about Cy Young and baseball, the game he loved.

Cy Young won 511 games in 22 seasons and pitched three no-hitters. Imagine what kind of contract he could command today for an arm like that.

Discover Marietta with Historic Trolley Tour

 


Trolley on Brick Street

The Marietta Trolley explores the city on those old brick streets.

   When Harley Noland opened his restaurant in Marietta, he began thinking of ways that could bring more tourists into the area. That was when the idea of a trolley struck him. This was twenty-five years ago, and the Marietta Trolley has been making tours ever since.

Levee House

The Levee House was a popular place to dine along the river.

   His restaurant, The Levee House, was located on the Ohio River making it convenient to have a Bed & Breakfast nearby on a historic riverboat, CLAIRE E. Both of those businesses are no longer in operation but the trolley lives on.

Harley

Guide Harley Noland brought the trolley to life again about 25 years ago.

   Sometimes Harley still gives the trolley’s guided tour, but there are also several local historians that help with that side of the project now. Each of them has wonderful factual knowledge of the area and tells accurate stories of those early pioneers who settled at the confluence of the Muskingum and Ohio Rivers.

   This is the perfect way to see the highlights of the city while traveling their old brick streets and learn about its history. The city has an abundance of beautiful Victorian homes, churches, earthworks and historic spots that will have you going back for a second look. There’s history on every corner!

   This year the trolley ride begins on Front Street at the Armory, which is the new home of the Marietta/Washington County Visitors Bureau. Then begins the ninety minute narrated tour of Marietta on the trolley made of mahogany with a great speaker system for easy listening.

Westward Monument

The Start Westward monument marks the 150th anniversary in 1938 of the signing of the Northwest Treaty Ordinance.

   Coming from the East Coast, the settlers designated the area along the Muskingum River as “The Commons”. Today there stands a monument to the 150th anniversary of the signing of the Northwest Territory Ordinance. This Memorial to the Start Westward of the United States was carved in 1938 by Gutzon Borglum, the same man who carved Mount Rushmore and dedicated by President Franklin D. Roosevelt.

shanty-boat

Ohio River Museum displays a shanty boat, which floated a family from job to job.

   A stop at the Ohio River Museum focuses on the role of the rivers in the expansion of our country. It gives a chance to view the last shanty boat, which is a complete house that people lived on. There is also the oldest pilot house in the United States close by.

w-p-snyder-jr

Stop back and take a tour of the W.P. Snyder, Jr to learn more about early riverboats.

   The Adventure Galley was the first flatboat to arrive in Ohio from Pittsburgh. The W.P. Snyder, Jr.. is now docked nearby and the last coal-fired, steam-powered sternwheel towboat to have operated on the Ohio River.

   Sacra Via, “Sacred Way”, is an ancient path from the Muskingum River to the earthworks in Marietta. The pathway was surrounded by earthen embankments about twenty-six feet high and was covered with mollusk shells from the river so that it sparkled in the moonlight.

   The mounds are the site of a Winter Solstice Sunset Watch and it is strongly believed these mounds were placed here for an astrological alignment. This site has not eroded in 2000 years due to the heavy clay used to build it up.

Conus Mound

Conus in Mound Cemetery was an ancient burial ground.

   Mound Cemetery contains Conus Mound, a burial mound surrounded by an earthen wall and a dry moat. This was used for burial and ceremonial purposes. The cemetery surrounding it has more Revolutionary war officers than any other cemetery in the United States.

Oil House

This was home to an early family who made their living from the oil fields.

   A bubbling black substance coming out of the ground was put on joints and felt to be a healing compound. It was called Panther Water and used as medicine. When its true purpose was discovered, the crude oil in this town made many men rich. That gives a reason for many of the lovely homes in the area.

Rufus Dawes House

Rufus Dawes house was the boyhood home of U.S. V.P. Charles Dawes, who was also a Nobel Peace Prize recipient.

   An interesting sidelight of the tour are the flood markings on many of the downtown buildings showing how high the flood waters came.  1913 looked like the year of a very high flood.  Many times the flood marks were up to the second story of the old brick buildings. Many of the rich built their homes on terraces to avoid the flood waters.

Newest Mansion

The newest mansion was built by a present-day entrepreneur who makes refrigerator magnets.

   But not all of Marietta’s lovely homes are old. One pillared house was built in the last 17 years by a man who manufactures something you wouldn’t think would be a million dollar business – refrigerator magnets.

The Castle

The historic Castle was built in 1855 at a cost of $10,000.

   The location of The Castle today sets on grounds that were originally used by a potter and his wife. It would have been one of the earliest pottery manufacturing locations in the Northwest Territory. Many prominent Marietta residents lived here including Ohio Senator Theodore Davis. Today it is open as a historical museum to honor the legacy of The Castle families as well as provides educational and cultural activities to learn more about its connection to Ohio history.

St Mary's

The Basilica of St. Mary of the Assumption is only one of the many historic churches on the tour.

   The Basilica of St. Mary of the Assumption was a stop off the trolley to view the spectacular interior, which takes one back to its European roots. The church was consecrated in 1909. The beautiful stained glass windows were created in Munich, Germany. There are nearly 140 images of angels throughout the church. Large angels bearing palm branches and torches can be found surrounding the sanctuary while cherubs adorn each column.

   Beauty like this would not have been normally seen at this time in history or even today for that matter. Many say it compares favorably with Basilicas in Europe.

harmar-historic-bridge

This Pedestrian bridge over the Muskingum River is a pleasant stroll from downtown Marietta.

   Fort Harmar, the first frontier fort in Ohio Country, was situated on the Muskingum River, called the easy way west. Built in 1785, it was named for General Josiah Harmar. He had been ordered by the United States Army to build a fort here to discourage illegal settlers from squatting there. It did just the opposite as made them feel protected by the fort nearby. Tall masted sailing ships were later built here.

Douglas Putnam Place

Anchorage was built on the hill in Harmar by abolitionist Douglas Putnam in 1859.

   The Douglas Putnam House sits high on the hill overlooking the river in the Harmar district. He was the leader of the abolitionist society in Marietta. As one of the wealthiest members, his support of the UGRR was not surpassed. From his house, you could see Virginia on the other side of the river, which at that time was not a real barrier as it was shallow enough to be crossed on horseback.

River Lafayette

The Lafayette is the oldest hotel in Marietta…and haunted.

   The trolley tour is one of the most popular tours in the Marietta area. Parking is free at the Marietta – Washington County CVB at 241 Front Street. Hop on the trolley Tuesday through Saturday during July and August at 10:00 to experience a glimpse of history.

   It’s a great way to discover Marietta!

Confluence Most Beautiful

Putnam said that where the Muskingum meets the Ohio River was the prettiest sight he had ever seen.

Take Exit 1 in Ohio off I-77 to Pike Street. Continue west on Pike Street until it ends at the Lafayette Hotel. Take a right and the Visitors Bureau will be at 241 Front Street. Buy your trolley ticket when you get on the trolley.

Old Stone Academy Opens Underground Railroad Exhibit

Freedom.

Its importance isn’t usually discovered until it is taken away.

Stone - Old Stone Academy

Stone Academy provided a place for Anti-Slavery meetings as well as the Underground Railroad.

Perhaps you have felt like running away from a bad situation. That’s how most of the slaves felt in their quest for freedom. The Underground Railroad helped them succeed in finding this special liberation.

   Even before the time of the Civil War, Anti-Slavery organizations were very active. A center of activity in Ohio was the Old Stone Academy in Putnam on the Muskingum River.

Stone - drive with timeline

The drive to the house has a timeline from the settling of John McIntyre in Zanesville until the end of the Civil War.

   While the Stone Academy served as a station on the Underground Railroad in the 1830s, that wasn’t the reason it was built back in 1809. The oldest building in Muskingum County was designed to be the new state capitol building. It was built by Dr. Increase Mathews, Levi Whipple and Ebenezer Buckingham.

   However, across the river in Zanesville, then a separate community, John McIntire and others constructed a building for that same purpose. Zanesville did serve as the capital of Ohio from 1810 to 1812.

Stone Anti-Slavery

“Coming to Blows” by Adam Chandler depicts the pro-slavery mob outside Stone Academy during an anti-slavery lecture.  Theodore Weld said, “Mob came, broke the windows and doors, tore off the gate and attacked me when I came out with clubs and stones…”

   The Stone Academy became a school and had public offices for several years. It was the center of abolitionist activity in Putnam with the Ohio Anti-Slavery Society holding state conventions there in 1835 and 1839. Both years, mobs of pro-slavery disrupted their meetings threatening to burn all of Putnam. The people of Putnam were very unpopular with their neighbors across the river in Zanesville.

Stone Notice to Slaves

This notice was posted as a warning to fugitive slaves.

   These abolitionists were mainly from New England and had a very strong religious background that made most of them desire to have equal rights for all. However, there was a section of this group that proposed sending the blacks back to Africa in the 1830s.

   The Stone Academy has been accepted by the National Park Service as part of the National Underground Railroad Network to Freedom. There is a new Ohio historical marker at the Stone Academy.

Stone - Putnam Presbyterian Church

The Putnam Presbyterian Church served as a meeting place for Anti-Slavery meetings.

   Nearby the Putnam Presbyterian Church held many anti-slavery meetings. Their pastor was the brother of Harriette Beecher Stowe. One of their popular speakers was Frederick Douglass, an African American orator who spoke of slavery issues across the state.

   A story was published about Douglass in “The Anti-Slavery Bugle”, which told of his purchasing a ride from Columbus to Putnam to speak at the Presbyterian Church. Douglass paid $3 in order to ride inside the stagecoach that day, but when they saw he was an African American, he was not permitted to ride. He took the case to court and won an out of court settlement for $15.

Stone - Increase Mathews House

Increase Mathews House was another stop on the Underground Railroad in Putnam.

   The slaves who came through this direction were understandably not very trusting of the station masters. These brave souls took a lot of chances during their flight. They wanted above all else to be free.

   Nelson Gant was one of those freed blacks who settled in Muskingum County. He had to raise money to purchase his wife’s freedom as she was still a slave in Virginia. Gant became one of the wealthiest men in the county with a successful produce business, which originated that famous cantaloupe, the Dresden Melon. He worked hard and transported slaves in his wagons.

Stone - Jim Geyer director

Museum director, Jim Geyer, told many interesting stories of the early days of the Stone Academy.

   In speaking with Jim Geyer, museum director, he tells of interesting programs they are developing to attract more people to the museum and the area. There are several UGRR stops involved in the area, not just the Stone Academy.

   Jim and other volunteers are reaching out to the community with a power point presentation suitable for schools, civic groups or retirement communities. He serves as a step-on guide for bus groups that come to the area. They are taken to various places in the Putnam Historic District that have a part in the UGRR story. At present, they have six sites locally that were part of that UGRR. These were called “safe houses”.

Stone - Lett Settlement

Lett Settlement, located where the Wilds is today, was composed of “free people of color”.

   Soon they are planning to add another interesting spot to their tours – The Wilds! There the Lett Settlement consisted of a group of “free people of color” who later assisted the fleeing slaves.

   Since the Stone Academy has been filled with so much activity over the years, it is no surprise that paranormal activity is frequently observed in the house and in the area. They have one special program called “History, Mystery, and Unsettled Spirits” that speaks of this phenomenon as well as some folklore. Ghost tours are conducted and paranormal investigations continue.

   Henry Howell managed the Ohio Anti-Slavery Society and gave fiery speeches. The residents across the river were not happy with his speeches and came to burn his house down. Howell escaped but his dog was left behind. They found the dog later hung in the back yard. Claims are made that the spirit of the dog can still be heard barking today.

Stone UGRR safe homes

A wall display tells of the ‘safe homes’ for the Underground Railroad.

   One problem they have at the Stone Academy is limited floor space and they have been discouraged from attaching pictures and displays to the walls. There are few artifacts here but much information in the form of charts and pictures. Due to the limited space, exhibits in the hallways are frequently changed.

Stone dolls

These dolls were made by an anti-slavery advocate with a duplicate set being given to Queen Victoria.

   The best part of the tour are the stories told by volunteers, who are very knowledgeable about its history.

Stone closet hideaway

This closet held a trap door that led to the basement where a slave could hide.

   The building served as a station for the Underground Railroad. A popular feature is a hidden trap door under the staircase that led to the crawl space under the building where the runaway slaves hid.

Stone - found under stairs

These articles were found under the stairs of the trap door.

  In the 1870s, Stone Academy became the private residence of Elizabeth Robbins, well-known actress, activist and writer. Today it is home to the display of the UGRR directed by Muskingum County History and located in the Putnam Historic District.

   Freedom remains an important element of our lives today. May we remain a nation where our freedom of choice is never extinguished.

The Old Stone Academy is located in Zanesville, Ohio. From I-70, take Exit 155 to Underwood Street.  Best to use your GPS to 115 Jefferson Street, which is across the Muskingum River using the 6th Street Bridge. There is an easy access parking lot beside the Stone Academy.

National Veterans Museum & Memorial Honors All Who Served

Veterans front shot

This symbolic architectural design houses the new National Veterans Museum and Memorial.

Those who dedicated their life to serving their country in all branches of the service during its many wars are being honored at the new National Veterans Museum and Memorial in Columbus, Ohio. Opened on the banks of the Scioto River in October of 2018, you will learn of their bravery, fears and belief in the greatness of America.

Veterans Memorial

A memorial statue along the outside walkway remembers those who served.

   Symbolizing the strength of our nation’s veterans, the unique architectural design of the building rises from within in a circular fashion to show their service never ends. The top of the building meets at a point to indicate that all the branches of the service come together to protect our nation and our world. This building has been recognized for its special innovative design and contains 28 million pounds of concrete.

Veterans trunks

Open the lid of a veteran’s trunk and hear his story.

   While stories of famous leaders like George Washington, Dwight D Eisenhower and John Glenn are well documented nationally, the stories of lesser-known heroes are often only known by family and friends. The NVMM is going to change all that by sharing their stories with the public.

Veterans letters

Letters from home have always been important to members of the military.

   Visitors are taken on a narrative journey as stories are told about veterans throughout the United States. Letters, pictures, and personal items help make these stories come alive. Listen to the letters they wrote home. Some will bring tears of sadness…or relief that they survived.

Veterans Time Line

The Informational Timeline stretches from 1775 until today.

   The Exhibition Galleries follow the curve of the concrete structure, which shares a timeline of highlights from the Revolutionary War until the present. The walls are covered with information so you have to be selective in what you read or you could be there for weeks.

Veterans drum Revolutionary and Civil

Andrew Avey played this drum during both the Revolutionary and Civil Wars.

   Talking to veterans at the museum was one of the real pleasures of the day. Many had not actually been in combat zones, but all felt an emotional attachment to those with whom they had served.

Veterans State Flags

The display of flags from all 50 states reinforces the fact that this is a national museum.

   Many tried to go out in the communities of the countries in which they were stationed to get a glimpse of real life there. Edward, a Marine who had served in Vietnam, went out with a missionary and played Santa for the children in their village.

Veterans Gear for Boot Camp

Veteran guide, Todd, explained the extensive, heavy boot camp gear.

   Todd, a veteran who is also a tour guide, shared his experiences in the Navy from 1965-69. His job was to patrol the coastline from Alaska to San Diego for Russian submarines. Another veteran, Dale, worked as a supply sergeant in the cold temperatures of Alaska where it was 59 below.

Veterans - Share Your Story

A special Share Your Story recording booth for veterans is located on the lower level.

   The Second Floor mezzanine features a Memorial Room to honor the fallen heroes. Here you will find a room where stories of the veterans can be videotaped for future generations. Many have relatives who have served but they don’t often like to talk about their experiences.

Veterans Memorial Grove

A Memorial Grove of American elms provides a place for reflection and relaxation.

   Outside the museum is a relaxing Memorial Grove consisting of American Elms, a tree that has given shelter to veterans since colonial times. This is a place for rest and contemplation with a beautiful limestone wall, a background symbolizing strength. Nothing relaxes more than water so the pool and cascades provide healing. Native plants appear throughout the area.

Veterans Wounded Veterans Memorial 2

The Wounded Veterans Monument recognizes all veterans – past, present and future.

   National Veterans Museum at 300 West Broad Street in Columbus Ohio is open to the public Wednesday – Sunday from 10:00 am – 5:00 pm. Over half of their visitors are veterans. People from all over the United States, Holland, Ireland, England and France have already felt the emotion of the museum.

   To honor our servicemen, all veterans and active duty military members are given complimentary admission and parking. The same is true for Gold Star families.

Veterans WWI flag

A National Guard unit, “The Buckeye Division”, carried this 48-star flag during WWI.

   Veterans have a special place in our world as many remain active in the community with a volunteer spirit. As one veteran said, “There was a reason we were spared…to come back and do something good.”

   We honor those men and women who have sacrificed to defend our country. They served to preserve our freedom.

Our freedom is not free. It comes with a cost.”

~Lydia Thompson, Gold Star Mother

Veterans OverviewThe new National Veterans Museum and Memorial is located at 300 West Broad Street in Columbus, Ohio just north of I-70. Once on West Broad coming from the east, go over the Scioto River and the museum is on the right-hand side.

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