Places to go and things to see by Gypsy Bev

Archive for the ‘Back Roads’ Category

Gypsy Highway

Snyder's BluffWhile visiting Vicksburg, Mississippi to do some research for a Civil War Diary, my journey took me to Snyder’s Bluff, one of the places frequently mentioned in the diary. This is where my GPS took me that hot, southern day.

   Dust settled over my gypsy car while exploring a dirt road not far from that grand Mississippi River that divides our country. With temperatures near 100 degrees as the sun beat down, I felt fortunate that the Chevy’s air conditioning worked properly.

   Soon the road went through a narrow pass cut into the ground with sides ten feet high and trees extending their roots like tentacles reaching out to capture something or someone. Because of the desire to do research for the book, my curiosity led me forward. After a few miles, no end seemed to be in sight so when the road widened, giving an opportunity to turn around, I maneuvered the car back and forth until it was headed out.

   Returning through the pass, a loud sound reached my ears and there was more dust up ahead. Around a slight bend headed straight toward me rumbled a semi loaded with logs. Imagine they were as surprised to see me as I was to see them.

   Somehow we passed with inches to spare between us and between the banks of the road with tree roots waiting to grasp. No walls came tumbling down!

   After that close call, it was necessary to stop for a few minutes. With my hand resting on my chest, I could feel the rapid heartbeat. The smell of dust filled the car.

   My lips felt like sandpaper from the dust and heat, and my tongue stuck to the roof of my mouth. Perhaps back on the main road, there would be someplace to buy a cold ice tea to wet my whistle.

   You never know what you might encounter when taking a Gypsy Highway. It made me wonder how Pvt. George Painter, the writer of the diary, handled the dangers in the area back in 1863 when he was a member of the Mississippi Marine Brigade.

A Simpler Thyme Shares Uses for Herbs

Julia WelcomeFood should be your medicine and medicine should be your food.

Turning your passion into a business creates the perfect way to live. That’s what Julia Brown has done with her passion for herbs, which began with her grandmother. That country grandmother would go out to the garden, gather herbs and whip them up into something that would help their ailments. Julia’s passion and business became “A Simpler Thyme.”

Julia Garden with Doves

This section of her herb garden contained doves.

   While she picked up her love of using natural herbs from her grandmother, Julia never knew what her grandmother was combining. That took time and study by Julia over the past thirty years as she learned how to use herbs both in food and medicine.

Julia Herb Walk

Take an herb walk with Julia after a yoga session.

   Julia is a certified master herbalist and iridology practitioner. For many years she has given classes, presentations on the benefits of herbs, and private consultations.

   In her later years, Julia’s mother lived with them. Mom had lost her sight but her mind still created visions of what she wanted for Julia. They talked about building a cabin behind her house up on the hill. Every night when Julia came home from work, they would discuss the cabin. She told her how to decorate it and even what dishes to use. Mom was a huge part of the cabin.

   Mom told Julia, “You have to promise me you will build your cabin.”

Julia Cabin

Her cabin serves as the perfect place for a quiet retreat or an interesting workshop.

   Julia remembers, “She made my dream come true. The cabin was her vision for me.” Amish built this perfect place for an herbal experience in nature’s own setting. She takes pride in her cabin and conducts workshops there to tell others about the benefits of using herbs for culinary as well as medicinal purposes. Take a beautiful drive through Amish country to rural Fresno to find her business called A Simpler Thyme.

Julia Herb Garden

Her house and cabin are surrounded by herb gardens.

   “God put herbs on this earth for our benefit,” so Julia wants to make people passionate about using herbs and doing things naturally. Everything our body needs is right in front of us, such as herbs, fruits, vegetables, nuts, seeds, grains, trees, water, fresh air, and sunshine.

Julia Sprouting Lentils

Julia always has a jar of sprouting lentils around for a healthy snack.

   We just need to learn how to use them better for ourselves and our families. Using healthy herbs in the food we prepare is an easy way of sneaking medicine to our family.

   She became even more passionate after her back injury in 2012. She fell down the steps and fractured her L5. Doctors wanted to do surgery, but Julia changed her diet and exercised, using food and herbs as her medicine. No surgery was required and her back is fine today.

   Her recent interest is iridology, the study of the human eye. While she cannot diagnose ailments, she can see strengths and weaknesses by looking at the iris of a person’s eye. Your iris serves as a map to your body. The left eye shows the medical history of the mother while the right eye tells that of the father.

Julia Mom's Bedroom with eyes

Julia received the answer as to whether she should study iridology from the quilt in her mom’s bedroom.

   At first, Julia wasn’t certain if she wanted to pursue studying all the needed information. She was looking for a sign to tell her what she should do. She sat down in a rocking chair in her mother’s bedroom and looked at the pattern on the back of the quilt. It looked like there were eyes all over it. At that moment, she felt sure she needed to pursue iridology. The eye is a lamp unto the body and a window to the soul.

Julia Entrance

An old-fashioned outhouse fits the scene perfectly.

   The entire family has helped with the project. Husband Brian and children Autumn and Austin have been instrumental in giving her ideas for giveaways and herbal samples. Workshops will be held a couple of times a month and the schedule can be found on her website www.asimplerthyme.com

Julia Fire Cider

Julia demonstrates making a jar of Fire Cider at a recent workshop.

   Attended an interesting workshop in Newcomerstown with the Friends at the Table, a cookbook club, which meets once a month. The workshop revolved around making Fire Cider, a sure-fire natural remedy for colds. A shot of Fire Cider every twelve hours often gives quick relief.

   Julia’s main goal is educating the public on the many uses of herbs. She stresses, “If you don’t know what the herb or root is, don’t put it in your mouth.”

Julia inside cabin 2

Inside her cabin is a comfortable and quiet place for a workshop.

   Plan to attend one of Julia’s workshops or meet with her for a personal consultation at her comfy cabin. “God provides everything for us and it is up to us to know what to do with it.”

   Herbal Blessings are sent by Julia Brown from A Simpler Thyme.

Life is an Adventure for Jo Lucas Master Gardener of the Year 2018

 

Jo Turkey hunting 001

Turkey hunting has been a long time family tradition.

Everywhere she goes, Jo Lucas finds something to enjoy. For her, life is discovering new things on a daily basis. Part of this she credits to meeting the love of her life, Don Lucas, who had a spirit of adventure like no other.

   Their adventure began in Cody, Wyoming where they were married…with an elk hunt for a honeymoon. Since then hunting, fishing, gardening and many other activities filled their lives until just recently when Don died as a result of an accident.

   Their adventures could fill a book and have created many fond memories for her. They made friends wherever they went.

Jo with bear 001

Don and Jo with the bear she shot in New Hampshire.

   In New Hampshire, they both shot a bear and the bearskins still hang in her house today. She was sitting in a log yard when a bear appeared lumbering through the logs, getting closer and closer. She decided there was no choice but to shoot it and killed it with one shot.

   But bears aren’t the only thing on her hit list. Moose, elk, antelope, turkeys and other small game have all been part of her adventures from Maine to Alaska. She’s visited 49 of the 50 states with Hawaii still on her bucket list.

Jo Ice Fishing 001

Ice fishing in Maine was a very cold but fun experience.

   Ice fishing in Maine provided an unusual experience as temperatures were down to -20 and -30 degrees when they took a snowmobile out on the ice. Sometimes when they were ice fishing, they had a portable shanty to use as a windbreak. In Alaska, salmon fishing captured their attention.

Jo Cooking Tent 001

Their cooking tent is packed with supplies.

   Sometimes they used a camper, but most often tents. They had a special cook tent and then several sleeping tents a short distance away just in case an animal would decide to invade the cook tent overnight. Two dogs and a pistol kept her feeling a little safer wherever she happened to camp.

Jo Farmers Market

Jo sold her salsa and jams at the local Farmers’ Market.

   Back home in Guernsey County, Jo enjoyed large gardens and a fruit orchard. From these, she made delicious salsas and jams that she sold at the Farmers’ Market during the summer season.

   As a youngster, she grew up in the 4-H program in the Millersburg area, where horses were her passion and project. But on Thanksgiving, everyone went turkey hunting. It was a family tradition!

Jo salmon 001

Fishing for salmon in Alaska was a real success.

   Since Jo’s move to Guernsey County, she has been involved in the community in so many ways. Jo was the auxiliary president who brought back the idea for Wonderland of Trees at the hospital. That first year, there were six trees and six wreaths.

Jo fruit trees covered

Fruit trees are covered with parachutes to keep birds from eating the fruit.

   Other community organizations that are lucky to have her assistance are the Soil & Water Conservation Board (vice-chairman), Ohio Association of Garden Clubs (district treasurer), Mt. Herman Church (treasurer), Hopewell Homemakers, and Adair Ladies Bible Study at Antrim. Perhaps it should be mentioned that Jo has a degree in accounting.

Jo Raspberries 001

Her raspberry patch is used for jams, pies, or just a bowl of berries!

   In the last couple of years, she decided to go back to that early passion from 4-H of training and showing horses. These days she assists at Breaking Free Therapeutic Riding Center near Norwich. This facility helps the handicapped improve their physical, psychological and cognitive behaviors through association with a friendly horse. Veterans are always welcome.

   Working here has given Jo real pleasure as she volunteers as barn manager. She gets horses ready for riding by exercising them beforehand. Yes, sometimes she even rides herself.

Jo Tomatoes 001

Her delicious salsa was made possible through this large tomato patch.

   Jo Lucas loves the out-of-doors in so many ways but gardening is one of her favorites. She was recently named OSU Extension Guernsey County Master Gardener of 2018, a well-deserved honor. Jo was one of those original Guernsey County Master Gardeners.

   She remembers her days in 4-H and all the help the advisors gave, so felt it was her turn to “give back” to the community. She has shared her knowledge of gardening with hundreds of Guernsey County elementary school children.

Jo Cherry Tree Pruning

These trees were used to demonstrate proper pruning methods.

   Ag school days, master gardener classes and workshops are a few of the ways that she has given back. Over the past few years, she has hosted three pruning workshops at her home.

Jo Lucas and Clif Little

Clif Little presents Jo with the Master Gardener of the Year Award.

   Local OSU Extension Educator, Clif Little, praised Jo by saying, “I can sum up her work as a Master Gardener volunteer as hard-working, energetic, friendly, generous and very interested in learning. She is the type of person that will always help when we offer gardening classes.” That says it all!

Jo Flowers 001

This flower bed contains crazy daisies, daylilies and iris.

But one place that Jo is a bit dangerous is in a plant nursery. She enjoys trying new plants and searches for them wherever she goes. Sometimes she comes home with almost too many.

   There are still a few places on her bucket list and both relate to ancestry. Her grandparents came from Austria and Ireland so those are two places she would enjoy exploring.

Bear Skin 2

This bearskin hanging on her wall at home makes her smile as she remembers her adventures.

   Of one thing you can be certain, Jo Lucas will not be sitting in a rocking chair watching the world go by. She’s always ready for an adventure as she strives to learn something new each day.

If you have interest in becoming a Master Gardener in Guernsey County, contact Clif Little in the Guernsey County Extension Office at 740-489-5300.

Today’s Fairview – Yesterday’s Pennyroyaldom

Kenny Keylor

The late Keny Keylor shared stories of Fairview and Pennyroyal Reunions.

Those who have lived in Fairview for a long time, have great memories to share that perhaps some have forgotten. Kenny Keylor had been around for 91 years. He shared some stories and pictures with me during a recent visit.

Fairview Bradshaw Tavern

Bradshaw Tavern and Inn along the old Zane’s Trace had famous visitors such as Henry Clay.

   A group from Maryland led by Ralph Cowgill and Hugh Gilliland stayed at the Bradshaw Inn as they walked the old Wheeling Road. When they stopped along the way some climbed a hill and are said to comment, “My, what a fair view.” The name stuck!

Fairview Main Street - small

This is a view of Fairview’s Main Street back in the 1800s.

   The town was laid out by Hugh Gilliland in 1814 on the border of Guernsey and Belmont counties. He platted thirty lots, each one-fourth of an acre and fronting on each side of the Wheeling Road. By 1866, 555 people lived there – it’s highest population.

DSC02524

A painting of the pennyroyal pant hangs in the Opera House today.

   A big attraction back in 1806 were the fields of pennyroyal that grew wild in the area. The herb received its name because it was a favorite of the English royalty who treated headaches, cold, arthritis and dizziness with this oil. Thus, the name Pennyroyaldom for the area.

Pennyroyal Distillery Postcard

Pennyroyal Distillery, where they made the “cure-all oil”, was captured on this old postcard.

   Benjamin Borton had learned how to distill the pennyroyal oil while living in New Jersey. His sons, grandsons, and great-grandsons continued in the business selling this “cure-all” oil after the family moved to Fairview.

Fairview looking west on National Road - UP Church in foreground

United Presbyterian Church sat along the old National Road looking west.

   This oil, along with tobacco, both “cash crops”, were shipped by freight wagons on the Old National Road to the eastern markets. Fairview produced more Pennyroyal Oil than any other place in the nation. Its medicinal purposes were still being sold in the 1980s until the government labeled it a possible carcinogen.

Fairview Home of Dr. Arnold

The home of Dr. H.J. Arnold in 1915 still stands today.

   Since the town was growing, Fairview became filled with many needed businesses: general stores, grist mill, millinery store, two hotels, and three cigar factories. Over twenty different occupations found a place in town to hang their shingle: dentist, doctor, undertaker, barber, and blacksmith to name a few. As you can tell, this was a thriving little community.

Fairview Costume House by O.G. Boyd

O.G. Boyd had this costume house in town and organized their Pennyroyal parade.

   A medical school existed in Fairview taught by Dr. T. McPherson. If someone wanted to become a doctor, he had to serve three years in the school and then one year in Columbus. They even had two local grave robbers who supplied cadavers to the school.

   To maintain their heritage, every August from 1880 until 2014, residents of Fairview and descendants of Fairview residents gathered for the Pennyroyal Reunion to enjoy music, food and a chance to share stories of Fairview.

thumbnail_Pennyroyal Reunion 1946

A large crowd attended the Pennyroyal Reunion in 1945.

   The first reunion was held in 1880 in Gardenia Grove just west of Fairview with 4500 people present. Organized by David Taylor, editor of the Guernsey Times, Sarchet’s History of Guernsey County states that Taylor was “the presiding genius and program maker of the Pennyroyal Reunion.” He gave the organization state-wide recognition as the greatest of all harvest-home picnics.

Fairview Pennyroyal Parade 2

People lined Fairview’s Main Street to watch the annual parade.

   The Governor of Ohio spoke at the Pennyroyal Reunion. He stayed in Barnesville and a horse and buggy brought him to Fairview, where he gave a speech in the afternoon. Five officials, who later became Presidents of the United States, also joined in the celebrations.

Fairview Pennyroyal Royalty

Pennyroyal Royalty highlighted festivities at the reunion.

   Kenny Keylor has been a big supporter of his community and the reunion for all his life. He played his guitar as part of the entertainment. His collection of Pennyroyal Reunion programs has only five years missing.

   In earlier years, entertainment took many forms. Minstrel shows were very popular and one year a three-act play was performed. Most recently their entertainment has been bluegrass music. But every year a chorus performed their Pennyroyal Song, Down in Ohio, with lyrics and music written by John H. Sarchet, who directed the chorus for many years.

Opera House

The building for today’s Pennyroyal Opera House has been around for over 150 years.

   Since those early days of Pennyroyaldom, today Fairview survives as a small town with a population of between 80 and 85. But their heritage is never forgotten as seen in these words from the first Pennyroyal Reunion program in 1880:

As each returning year revolves in time,

May all true sons of childhood’s happy home

Return from distant places, where they roam,

And keep a day in stories and in rhyme.”

~Robert B BuchananFairview sign

Fairview is located along I-70 today between Wheeling, WV and Cambridge, OH. Take exit 198 to the north of the interstate and turn left into the small town of Fairview. You might want to visit sometime when the Pennyroyal Opera House has some great bluegrass music.

Get Ready to Rope

Bev Hachita 001A short true adventure

Cowboys began roping as part of ranch work to brand or medicate their calves. It became a contest to see which cowboy could do it the quickest. Their goal was to throw a lasso around a calf’s head, jump off their horse, tie three of the calf’s legs together, and finish the trick as fast as possible. This led to roping contests at rodeos and fairs.

   Recently, a new type of roping sprang up. My first experience with this happened in a small town of about thirty people called Hachita, New Mexico. The only disturbance in this small town might be a dust devil coming down the street or a Border Patrol helicopter flying overhead.

   One week in 1996, they decided to try this new kind of roping…a chicken roping. Yes, chickens, with feathers flying and beaks crowing. One roper told those watching, “If it has legs, it can be roped.”

   Bev Chicken Roping 001   Now this kind of roping would not be done from a horse and would require a different kind of lasso. Just a heavy piece of string is used, so they don’t choke the chicken.

   Just like in the world of cattle, the chickens they roped all had names. The meaner the animal, the meaner its name. Names like Jalapeno Joe, Cholulu Chuy or Red Hot Flame were typical.

   A large crowd of over fifty people gathered to witness the chicken roping. The chicken would be let out of a box and the cowboy would be timed to see how fast he could rope it. The one who roped it the fastest won a Chicken Roping Belt Buckle with a turquoise stone found in the Little Hatchet Mountains nearby.

   Small towns often have fun in unusual ways. A mural of the Chicken Roping was painted by a traveling artist on the outside of the bar there. Inside on the wall were pictures of the winners. It soon became an annual event with even larger crowds.

   And afterward? What else, but a good old-fashioned chicken BBQ.

Hachita Liquor Saloon was no longer in operation on my last trip west. The paintings on the building were done by an old friend, C.M. Scott, a cowboy artist.

Stockport Mill and Inn Gives Scenic View of Muskingum River

A retreat for all reasons – or no reason at all

Stockport Dam

Turbulent waters recently flowed past the Stockport Mill and Inn along the Muskingum River.

Escape crowds and noise. Listen to the sounds of the flowing river. Enjoy a delicious meal. All of these become part of the experience when visiting Stockport Mill and Inn on the Dam at the edge of Stockport, Ohio. Explore the history of the area while you “mill around”.

Stockport Locke

This hand-operated lock sets across the Muskingum River from the inn.

     Stockport Mill, located at the sixth in a series of locks and dams on the Muskingum River, had its beginning in 1842. The building today is the third mill on that site. It was built in 1906 by the Dover Brothers. By using a pair of 10-inch Leffel turbines, it not only provided power to run the mill but generated electricity for the town of  Stockport.

Stockport Mill Sign

This old mill sign hangs on the porch of the Stockport Inn on the Dam.

     Stockport Milling Company was known for making Gold Bond, Seal of Ohio and Pride of the Valley refined flours. Products were shipped on steam packet boats and on the Ohio & Little Kanawha Railroad, because good roads were not available at that time.

Stockport Corn Grinder

Some antique equipment, like the corn separator, can be found throughout the inn.

     That early mill supplied many different needs. Farmers could get feed and supplies for their animals, including halters and show supplies. Wives used the mill to purchase their garden seeds and plants. Even the children found a place to pick up a 4-H project in the form of baby chicks.

Stockport Slate in Entrance

Slate from the roof has been recycled into wall covering at the inn’s entrance.

     This was also the place where farmers met to share their news, until it ceased operation as a feed mill in 1997.  Three years later this beautiful old mill was restored and now functions as Stockport Mill Inn and Restaurant on the Dam. It is the only mill still remaining of many that dotted the busy river in the past.

     The owner, Dottie Singer, has attempted to preserve the original architecture and building materials. Inside you’ll find many unusual antiques, information about the history of the area, and great pictures and paintings throughout donated by local Morgan County residents.

Stockport Suite

Hudson Suite offers a view of the river and a jacuzzi for relaxation.

     There are fourteen guest rooms with private balconies, which all have scenic views of the Muskingum River. You might choose to stay in the Morgan Raider Suite, Valley Gem River View, or Captain Hook Suite.

Stockport Lounge

This meeting room contained workings of the mill as well as a place to visit.

     Suites come with a jacuzzi, while other rooms still have that old fashioned claw bath tub. Each of the four floors has a meeting room for relaxation as well as early morning taste treats. This is a great place for a reunion, wedding, business meeting, or just to get away.

Stockport Dining Room

Enjoy weekend meals at Stockport Restaurant on the Dam.

     Their dining area has a wrap around terrace so you can have a delicious meal while watching the river drift by. The restaurant is open weekends throughout most of the year, but closed in January. Friday and Saturday, their hours are 5PM-9 PM, while on Sunday, their delicious buffet, which brings memories of Sunday dinners on the farm, runs from noon-4PM.  Reservations are recommended.

Stockport Turbine

This was one of the original turbines that provided electricity to the mill and town of Stockport.

     While those early turbines that produced electricity for the town became corroded, new turbines have been installed that are similar Samson Leffel turbines. The only difference is these new ones have stainless steel parts instead of the early carbon steel, which rusted.

Stockport Tunnel

This is the exit tunnel for the water after it has run through the turbines.

     Water enters the turbines through a trash-rack, which keeps logs from interfering with turbine action. Then it goes in a tunnel under the mill, where it hits a runner, which turns and makes the power.

Stockport Wall 2

Guests are encouraged to visit the “Signing Wall” along the steps on their way to see the turbines in the basement area.

     The generator sets on top of the Speed Increaser at a level above the 100-year flood level. This Hydro Project produces around 800,000 kilowatt hours per year, using seventeen million gallons of water each day. After all their electric needs are met at the mill, any excess electricity is sold to the electric company. It’s no surprise that today this system is run by a computer!

Stockport Balcony

There’s always an exciting view of the Muskingum River from the balconies.

     For those who like to stay away from it all, Stockport Inn and Mill Restaurant on the Dam would be the perfect place. Guests often come back for the river view from their balcony, great food, and the rustic décor. Many have a favorite suite they use time after time.

Stockport Summer

In the summer, the river here is peaceful near Stockport, Ohio.

     Relax as you hear the sound of the river bubbling right past your balcony at this historic structure. Look for it on your next trip down the Muskingum River.

Stockport Mill and Inn on the Dam is located just off Route 60 along the Muskingum River about halfway between Zanesville and Marietta. Cross over the river at Ohio 266 W and the mill will be on the left hand side. Their address is 1995 Broadway Avenue, Stockport, Ohio.

 

Malabar Farm, Home of Louis Bromfield

Malabar The Big House

The “Big House” served as home to Louis Bromfield, his wife and three daughters.

Enter Pleasant Valley to find Malabar Farm, the dream of Louis Bromfield. Tour his “Big House”, visit animals in his barn, or follow the self-driven auto tour of Shawshank Redemption film sites. Spend a day or a weekend.

Malabar Smokehouse

Bricks for this smokehouse came from the Mansfield home of Henry Wallace, vice-president of the United States under Franklin Roosevelt.

Louis Bromfield, Pulitzer Prize winning author, was born in Mansfield. After a variety of experiences, he returned to that area for what he considered the perfect place to live. Two things he loved all his live were the farm and words.

Malabar Desk

Often Bromfield wrote at this desk while looking out the window at his farm.

It seemed he had trouble early in life finding that magical work that would please him. He went to agriculture college, studied journalism, served in the Army as an ambulance driver, journeyed through France and eventually came back to the United States to work at writing for several newspapers.

Malabar Gift Shop Books

The gift shop had a fantastic selection of Bromfield’s novels.

Following those experiences, Bromfield began writing novels, which won him high acclaim. His first book, Green Bay Tree, was a big success. His novels were always based on the people and places he knew well. He used a quilt pattern by taking one piece from here and another from there and fitting them all together. He turned his life into stories. All thirty novels were best sellers and several became motion pictures.

Malabar Pulitzer Book

His novel, Early Autumn, earned Bromfield the 1927 Pulitzer Prize.

His third novel, Early Autumn, won the 1927 Pulitzer Price for Novels. This financial success gave him opportunity to take his wife and three daughters to Paris for a few years and also visited India for a few months. How they all enjoyed life in Paris, but when threat of WWII was in the air, Bromfield brought his family back to the United States.

Malabar Portrait

This portrait of Bromfield and his wife, Mary, reminded them of their happy times in France.

In 1939, Bromfield settled back into his old hometown area of Pleasant Valley, where he purchased three farms, totaling one thousand acres. Since he enjoyed the Malabar coast of India, the farm was called Malabar, which means “gently rolling hills and valleys”.

Malabar Grand Piano

Bromfield’s daughter, Hope, played this piano for the wedding of Humphrey Bogart and Lauren Bacall.

Starting with the original farmhouse, he added several additions for a total of 32 rooms, including nine bedrooms and ten bathrooms. This “Big House” became the perfect place to entertain his guests from Hollywood. If you came to visit, Bromfield insisted you help with farm work. That’s how Shirley Temple learned how to milk cows and Jimmy Cagney to run a vegetable stand.

Malabar Wedding 001

This sketch by Tom Bachelder captured Humphrey Bogart and Lauren Bacall cutting their wedding cake after being married at Malabar Farm in 1945.

A close friend was Humphrey Bogart, who asked Bromfield if he could get married at Malabar. Arrangements were made for Bogart and Lauren Bacall to have their ceremony there with 700 guests attending.

Malabar Bromfield at desk

This old photo shows Bromfield at one of his desks, where he did some of his writing.

Every room of their house contains shelves of books, nearly 4,000 total. Bromfield is said to have only slept two or three hours a night so that gave him extra time to read and write novels. His daytime hours were most likely spent pursuing his interest in agriculture.

Malabar Louis and Prince

The painting shows Bromfield with his favorite Boxer, Prince.

Over seventy dogs lived at Malabar during Bromfield’s life there and eighty percent of them were boxers. His favorite boxer was Prince. There’s even a picture of a ghost boxer dog still hanging around.

Malabar Guide, Alana and Jeep

Our guide, Alana, tells about the restored Jeep that Bromfield used around the farm.

His ideas as a conservationist changed the face of agriculture in Ohio. He needed to enrich the worn-out soil so planted soybeans and plowed them under to add nitrogen to the soil. Hillsides were planted around in strips to avoid erosion, and he promoted the idea of rotation of crops. His decision to use the spreading multifloral rose as a fence still angers farmers today.

Malabar sign

Malabar Maple Syrup Cabin

Over 650 maple trees are being tapped along the road to Maple Syrup Cabin.

In 1972, the state of Ohio accepted the deed to Malabar Farm and pledged to uphold its beauty and preserve the ecological value of the farm. Everything inside remains as it was when the Bromfields lived there. Then in 1976, Malabar Farm became an Ohio State Park.

Malabar Restaurant

Built in 1820 from bricks made on site, the Schrack Place has become Malabar Restaurant.

There’s no charge to enjoy the trails with rocks and caves, and the tour of “Big House” is only $5. Check out their calendar at www.malabarfarm.org for many exciting activities. Don’t forget the educational Welcome Center.

Malabar Shawshank Trail

Follow the self-guided auto tour of authentic Hollywood sites from the Shawshank Redemption movie, which was filmed in part on Malabar Farm.

If you enjoy a country drive on scenic back roads, Malabar Farm might be the perfect place for an adventure. Perhaps we’ll come back for a ghost tour in the future.

Malabar Farm is located in Richland County about seven miles southeast of Mansfield. Their address is 4050 Bromfield Road, Lucas, Ohio. Using your GPS would be a great idea as there are many country roads to travel.


Tag Cloud