Places to go and things to see by Gypsy Bev

Archive for April, 2019

Hoover Historical Center Displays Sweeping Changes

Hoover Herb Garden

The Tannery and family home showcase an award-winning herb garden.

Spring usually brings thoughts of ‘Spring Cleaning’ to many, especially those of the older generation. It seemed like a great time to explore methods of cleaning through the years at the Hoover Historical Center in North Canton, home of the Hoover Company. Here you’ll find the most extensive antique vacuum cleaner collection in the world.

Hoover 2300 BC early broom

We’ve come a long way from this 2300 BC twig broom on display.

   Although the museum is located inside Walsh University’s Hoover Park, the building where it is located is actually the Victorian childhood home of William H. Hoover, founder of the Hoover Company. Tours begin in a modest building behind the house on their original family farm.

Hoover Tanning Tools

Tools used in the Tannery by the Hoovers are on display.

   Located here was a tannery, a business the Hoovers engaged in before the vacuum cleaner idea caught his attention. This building served as the first home of the Hoover family with much of the inside being original.

Hoover 1910 Kotten Suction Cleaner

Ann Haines, our guide, showed how moving her feet side-to-side on the platform created suction for the 1910 Kotten Vacuum Cleaner.

   In the tannery, there is an exhibit of their tanning equipment and the leather goods they produced. You’ll also see an exhibit of all early manually operated cleaning devices.

Hoover cartoon Husband rocks to run sweeper

In this early method, the husband rocked to provide energy to run the wife’s vacuum cleaner.

   The first upright vacuum cleaner was invented by a friend of the family, James Spangler, in 1908. James, a department store janitor and part-time inventor, had a problem with asthma and thought the carpet cleaner he was using at work was the cause of it. He created the Electric Suction Sweeper and produced it himself for a while with the help of his family. But they only completed two or three machines a week.

Hoover Gates

Gates leading to the Hoover Museum are made of original bricks from the Hoover Co. smokestack.

   Spangler sold one of these vacuums to a friend, Susan Hoover, who was so impressed with it that she told her husband ‘Boss’ and son Herbert about it. Quickly, Hoovers bought the patent and opened the Electric Suction Sweeper Company in New Berlin, now North Canton.

   That first vacuum weight 40 pounds so not the easiest thing to push around the house. The cost was $60 for the vacuum and an additional $15 for attachments. Only the rich had electricity at this time so they were proud to purchase a new idea such as the vacuum.

   Spangler became production supervisor receiving royalties in addition to his salary. The company name was changed in 1910 to Hoover Suction Sweeper Company with Spangler’s family still receiving royalties until 1925.

Hoover early ad 2

This ad was placed in the Saturday Evening Post for a ten-day free trial of the Hoover.

   In order to gain public interest, Hoover placed an ad in The Saturday Evening Post offering customers ten days free use of his vacuum cleaner to anyone who requested it. He thus developed a national network of retailers for his vacuums. Before long, Hoover had companies in Canada and England.

   The “Sweeping Changes” chronological display shows the evolution of Hoover appliances throughout their history. In 1932, the Hoover Company was the largest maker of vacuum cleaners in the world. By 1999, Hoover employed 2,800 workers in Stark County.

2000 Hoover Headquarters

A rebuilt smokestack still stands where the Hoover headquarters was in 2000.

   Sales conventions were a special summer event in North Canton. Salesmen from all over the United States and foreign countries met in Hoover Park. A circle of large tents was set up for their housing with a large tent for meals. Salesmen were taught how to sell and how not to sell through lively skits.

   Here they learned about the three kinds of dirt: litter, dust and grit. All three were spread on people’s floors when salesmen went to demonstrate their vacuum, which would pick up all three.

 

Hoover Ann with later models

Ann explains some of the later Hoover models.

  While touring the house, listen to an old recording of Hoover salesmen singing, “All the Dirt, All the Grit,” the Hoover theme song in the 1920s and ’30s. They’ll give you the words so you can sing along if you like.

Hoover WWII children

This picture shows the Hoover employees’ children brought from London during WWII. The bottom one shows them at Thanksgiving dinner.

   During WWII, 1500 children were moved out of England and shipped to Canada for safety purposes. Hoover families in London sent 83 of their children to stay with Hoover employees in Canton in 1940.

   Boss Hoover took great care of them and paid all their medical expenses as well as treated them like family. These children were delighted to taste watermelon, hot dogs and hamburgers for the first time. All 83 returned to London after the war.

Hoover war time products

Hoover switched to making products for military use during WWII.

   A special display shows items that were made during WWII. Since the men were all at war, 240 women worked in the factories in 1940 and no longer made vacuum cleaners. Instead, they made liners for helmets, parachutes, and fuses, which were said to be second in importance to the atomic bomb. By 1945, the number of women employed had risen to 3900. Hoover Company received many awards for their WII efforts.

Hoover products

Hoover branched out to making more than just vacuums.

   After the war, the Hoover Company expanded into household items making a stand-up iron, apartment size washers and driers, and refrigerators. Back in 1988, they explored using robots to make their vacuums. This was a very forward-thinking company.

Hoover William Boxx

The well-loved William H. “Boss” Hoover founded the Hoover Company.

   As you can tell, this small historic center is packed with interesting information about the history, not only of the vacuum but of our country and its people. Everyone loved ‘Boss’ Hoover, a name given him affectionately as he cared for his employees and their families. Perhaps that is how he became the first mayor of North Canton.

   Hoover Historical Center is open to the public on Thursday, Friday and Saturday afternoons with tours beginning hourly 1-4 pm, March through October. No admission is charged for the tour, although donations are appreciated. There’s something here for almost any interest.

   Every day is better with a Hoover. It Beats….as it Sweeps…as it Cleans!

Hoover Historical Center is located on the campus of Walsh University in North Canton. From I-77 take exit 109A  to Whipple Avenue and Maple Street. The center is located at 1875 E. Maple Street. 

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The Cambridge Singers Have a Song in Their Heart

Cambridge Singers 2017

The present Cambridge Singers often dress eloquently for their performances.

Music makes the world a happier place. If you enjoy singing around the house or while driving your car, perhaps you’d like to join The Cambridge Singers, either singing as a member or listening in the audience.

Kathy Turner, Cambridge Singers director

Kathy Antill, the director, brings experience and new energy to the group.

   The unique sound created by The Cambridge Singers sets them apart from traditional groups. This wonderful group of singers is the oldest continually operating six-part harmony chorus in the state. Recently Kathryn Antill took over the helm of directing this elite group.  Tom Apel accompanies them on the piano.

Singers Fred Waring Award 001 (2)

This 1955 Waring Award was the beginning of “The Cambridge Singers”.

   It all began with a group called “Musigals”, a group of married women who loved to sing. Then in 1965, they decided to add some men to the chorus for a special show. It was suggested that they enter the Fred Waring Sacred Heart Program Choral Competition by sending in a tape for critique.

Singers Fred Waring Trophy 001 (2)

The Fred Waring trophy still brings a feeling of pride and accomplishment.

   They won first prize and a beautiful trophy in the mixed ensemble category over a field of entries from all over the United States and Canada. Their award-winning rendition of “O Sacred Heart” was heard on 875 television and radio stations.

   With that kind of success, they drew up a charter for the group, and officially became “The Cambridge Singers” in November, 1965 under the direction of Donna Shafer Blackwood. Their first concert under that name occurred at Easter of 1966 in The First Presbyterian Church.

Singers Salt Fork Lodge 001 (2)

Sometimes the chorus harmonizes outside Salt Fork Lodge

   This chorus has sung every kind of music and entertained audiences around the state. Their performances have included: AmeriFlora, the Columbus Symphony Orchestra, Miss Clayland Pageant, and Barnesville Pumpkin Show.

Singers Carnegie Hall 001 (2)

The chorus had a happy time at Carnegie Hall.

  In 1991, The Cambridge Singers performed at Carnegie Hall during their 100th-anniversary celebration accompanied by the Manhattan Philharmonic. This talented group is proud to have been invited back, and hope to make a repeat trip in the near future.

   In the lifetime of the chorus, there have been over 130 community members who have participated with eight different directors and three accompanists. They practice each Tuesday at First Presbyterian Church. 

Marge Stover

Marge Stover, back center, has been with the group from its beginning.

   One member, Marge Stover, happens to be the only charter member of the group still performing. She shares with her family a great musical background and was pleased when asked to join the group. Marge not only has a beautiful voice but has helped with every aspect of the singers at one time or another from costumes to set design.

Singers Mayor's Award 001 (2)

The late Mayor Sam Salupo presents former Director Jim Whitehair with the Mayor’s Award about ten years ago.

   Costumes are of great importance and they are pleased that the Kiwanis Foundation and Rotary Club have given them grants, which they used for costumes. The Rotary Club has also given a grant for music in honor of the late Dr. Quentin Knauer, who sang in the chorus for fifty years. The chorus sincerely appreciates all the support they receive from the community.

Singers Go Patriotic 001 (2)

The Cambridge Singers added some choreography to this patriotic tune.

   Each year, The Cambridge Singers have a spring show and one at Christmas, both of them being at the Scottish Rite Auditorium in downtown Cambridge. The chorus has performed at nearly every Salt Fork Festival and their Christmas appearance at the Guernsey County Senior Center plays to a standing room only crowd.

The Cambridge Singers

The Cambridge Singers performed at the 48th Salt Fork Festival.

   While memorable performances are their main goal, members feel the group is an extended family, who gives them support during troubled times. When attending the Tuesday rehearsals, all troubles disappear for two hours as they harmonize in song. Music heals the mind, body and soul.

Singers Children 001 (2)

Children of chorus members take part in the annual Christmas program.

   This group has a special interest in encouraging young people to become involved in the world of music. Each year they present several scholarships to area youth. The prestigious Rigel Award is given in memory of Everett “Red” and Mary Ann Rigel, both long-time members of Cambridge Singers. This honors a community member who promotes and advocates music, music education and the importance of the arts in all walks of life.

   If you have an interest in joining The Cambridge Singers or have other questions about the group, contact any member or call Janet Teichman at 740-638-2220 or Gayle Roberts at 740-680-1723. They will welcome you with open arms and a song in their heart.

   The Cambridge Singers’ wish is to promote music and the musical quality of life in our community. Most of all, they love music.

Busy Season for Senecaville Fish Hatchery

Hatchery Welcome SignSenecaville State Fish Hatchery is among the nation’s best hatcheries. Each year, approximately 20 – 25 million fish are raised here by the ODNR Division of Wildlife. They supply lakes and reservoirs around Ohio, as well as six pools in the Ohio River and 10 pools in the Muskingum River.

   Since approximately 1.3 million people go fishing in Ohio each year, it has become necessary to assist with the natural propagation of fish in Ohio waters. ODNR operates six fish hatcheries throughout Ohio for this purpose.

 

Hatchery Overlook

The bridge over the dam makes a great place to get an overview of the hatchery.

   The Senecaville Fish Hatchery is located in southern Guernsey County just below the dam on beautiful Seneca Lake. Beginning as a federal hatchery in 1938, when they first raised striped bass to replenish dwindling fish supplies, the hatchery now has 37 ponds containing a total of 37 water acres. Water is supplied by Seneca Lake, which can deliver 2,000 gallons per minute.

 

Hatchery Egg Jar

Casey Goodpaster displays the incubator jar where eggs are kept until hatched.

   Fish hatchery technicians, Casey Goodpaster and Josh Binkley, have been there about fifteen years each. Both have gone to college and have degrees in Parks and Recreation, and Fish Management respectively. These men do much more than care for fish as they often become mechanics, painters, welders, and mowers at the facility. They enjoy the freedom of spending much of their time outside.

 

Getting eggs

Eggs are being stripped from a walleye into a large bowl at Mosquito Lake.

   This is the time of year when the fish hatchery at Seneca Lake is busiest of all. In early March, the fish hatchery collects about 300 quarts of walleye fish eggs from Mosquito Lake in the Youngstown area. This adds up to around 20–30 million eggs!

W alleye released to the lake

Once the eggs have been gathered from the fish, the walleye are placed back into the lake.

 

Hatchery net

Josh Binkley uses a net to gather the fingerlings from the collection tank.

   The eggs are then fertilized and about three quarts are put into each incubator tube. Water must move through the tubes constantly to keep the eggs from sticking together. It takes two to three weeks for them to hatch before moving up the tubes and into a holding tank.

  Walleye

saugeye

The saugeye is a combination of a female walleye pictured above and the male sauger below.

   Often they cross a female walleye with a male sauger to create saugeye. This is done with about fifty percent of the walleye eggs since the saugeye have a much higher survival rate. Saugeye are well suited for Ohio reservoirs and grow rapidly.

 

Fingerling

Fingerlings are very small but ready for the lake.

   The newly hatched fish is called a ‘fry’ and is about the length of half an eyelash, according to one technician. Finally, the last juvenile stage is that of a fingerling about 15 cm long. At this time, they can be placed directly into the lake.

catfish

Catfish are raised in June and July and kept in the hatchery ponds for about a year.

A little later in the year in June and July, the hatchery will be raising channel catfish. They lay their eggs in a spawn inside a can placed in the ponds. These layers of eggs are then gently moved inside to hatch in five to seven days. After being fed fish meal for about a week, they quadruple their size and are then placed in the ponds for up to a year before stocking them in lakes and streams.

 

Hatchery ODNR sign

ODNR took over operations at the hatchery in 1987.

   When fishermen purchase rods, reels, fishing tackles, fish finders and motorboat fuel, they pay an excise tax. The federal government collects these taxes and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service distributes the funds to state fish and wildlife agencies. These funds acquire the habitat, stock the fish, provide education and develop boat accesses.

 

Seneca Lake Fish Hatchery

This airplane view captures the entire hatchery complex at Senecaville.

    At the Senecaville Fish Hatchery, there are four full-time employees and one part-time in the summer. Employees receive annual training through workshops regarding many topics from chain saw cutting to herbicides, fish and more.

 

Hatchery Stocking Truck

Their stocking truck carries oxygen and a water pump to keep the water moving.

    Senecaville Fish Hatchery is open to the public Monday – Friday from 10:00-3:00. This is also a great place for a group tour, especially school children, to see how the facility operates and learn more about the varieties of fish. Watch for special times when youngsters can fish at the hatchery.

   The best times to view the hatchery in operation are from April through June. They will begin to get eggs in the hatchery during the month of March. A visit to the Senecaville Fish Hatchery would be a great family experience.

Senecaville Fish Hatchery is located on beautiful Seneca Lake in Guernsey County with easy access from I-77 exit 37. Take OH 313 east about six miles and turn right on OH 574. The hatchery is on the right-hand side.

Richland Carrousel Park Features Hand-Carved Animals by Carousel Works

Carrousel Park Entrance

Two bronze horses guard the entrance to Richland Carrousel Park. In the summer, pink rose bushes surround the building.

Riding the carousel, or merry-go-round as it is often called, has always been a thrill. But usually, this was only possible at a fair or carnival event. In Mansfield, you can ride the Richland Carrousel any time during the year…for only $1.00! This is possible because the carousel is inside a building in cooler weather, with sides that open during the summer months.

Carousel Art and Dan

Carousel Works’ owners, Art and Dan, tell their story surrounded by their creations.

   Wanting to provide communities with a touch of the past, Art Ritchie and Dan Jones formed Carousel Works in 1986. Their goal was to repair old carousels and build new wooden carousels at an affordable price.

   Art became interested in carving back in grade school. He first began carving covered bridges in his basement in Connecticut. When someone brought him a valuable antique rabbit to refurbish, they asked him if he could make something similar. That began Art on his journey to refurbishing antique carousels and making new ones.

Carousel Seahorse 2

A colorful seahorse is one of their latest creations.

   Due to his excellence at carving beautiful wooden animals, he especially needed help with restoration. That’s when he contacted Dan, a friend of the family, to help with restoration and finances. Soon the pair moved their business to Mansfield – a central location to many major cities in the United States – where they created their first complete carousel as Carousel Works.

Carrousel Kids of all ages

Rides on the carousel are enjoyed by people of all ages.

   Richland Carrousel is the first hand-carved carousel since the 1930s. Used as an idea to spur downtown development, the pavilion was opened in August 1991 when cost was 50 cents for a ride. This carousel measures 80′ X 80′ X 30′ tall at its highest point.

Carrousel Paintings

Above the carousel, there are paintings that depict various local attractions.

   All 52 figures were designed, carved and painted by Carousel Works of Mansfield in the style of G.A. Dentzel, a revered carver from the early 1900s. Music for carousel riders is provided by a Stinson Band Organ, made in Bellefontaine, Ohio.

Carrousel Fun

Children carefully choose their favorite horse or animal to ride.

   Here you’ll find 30 horses but also four bears, four ostriches, four cats, four rabbits, a goat, giraffe, lion, tiger, zebra and a mythical hippocampus ( part horse, part fish). The inside animals go 3.71 mph, while the outside animals travel 6.77 mph. Children and adults enjoy choosing which animal they will ride. Or maybe you prefer to ride in a chariot!

Carousel Rich smoothing

Rich has been constructing carousel animals for 28 years at Carousel Works.

   Richland Carrousel is only one of the many carousels that have been built or restored by the amazing artisans at Carousel Works. Their work can be found coast to coast in nearly sixty places such as Kentucky Horse Park, Denver Zoo and Royal Caribbean cruise ships.

Carousel Ashley handpainted flowers

Our guide, Ashlea, hand paints each flower individually so each is unique.

   Most of the Carousel Works’ creations include carousels where handicapped can ride easily. The horse in front of each of the chariots swivels and the chariot seat flips up to accommodate a wheelchair. Everyone gets a chance to experience the thrill of riding on the carousel. 

Shawshank Soda

Shawshank Fans can pick up a bottle of Andy’s Root Beer or Red’s Strawberry soda.

   Don’t forget to stop by the Richland Carrousel Gift Shop and concession area for inexpensive gifts and great treats you won’t find anywhere else: musical carousels, toys, a Ladies Boutique and Old-Fashioned Shawshank Soda – Red’s Strawberry and Andy’s Root Beer.

Carousel Magic Horse

Ashlea holds the book that tells the story of this magical horse in “The Secret of the Carousel” written by Art’s granddaughter, A.R. Blakely.

   First Friday is Family Fun Night with five rides for $2. They always have special food that kids enjoy such as hot dogs, corndogs, cookies and popcorn. Hours are from 4:00-8:00 on the first Friday of every month. Join them at the Carrousel for a child’s birthday party or just for a night of enjoyment.

Carousel Animals

The detail on each of the Carousel Works’ creations makes them extra special.

   Richland Carrousel Park is open from 11:00-5:00 seven days a week every day of the year with the exception of five major holidays. Plan now to take the whole family for a ride they won’t soon forget. It’s full of old-fashioned charm in a fun, modern setting.

You have to grow older, but you don’t have to grow up!

Richland Carrousel Park is located in downtown Mansfield, Ohio at 75 N. Main Street. From I-77 take exit 104 west, which is Route 30.  Follow Route 30 all the way to downtown Mansfield.

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