Places to go and things to see by Gypsy Bev

Archive for the ‘Cambridge’ Category

Doug Waller Collects Stories of Bigfoot Experiences

Author of Four Bigfoot Books

Doug at Library

Doug Waller greets those attending a lecture at the library.

If you have an encounter with a large, hairy, ape-like creature, Doug Waller is the man to call. He’s writing books about the experiences people have had with what they call Bigfoot or Sasquatch. His stories come from sightings all over the world.

bigfoot-newcomerstown

This Bigfoot statue, a favorite of mine, can be found in Newcomerstown at The Feed Barn.

   People have been intrigued by the Legend of Bigfoot for hundreds of years. This large hairy creature is known as Bigfoot in the United States, Sasquatch in Canada, and Yeti in the Himalayans. It’s no surprise that the creature received his name after footprints were discovered that were very large – up to 24 inches long.

Bigfoot sightings US and Canada

This map shows Bigfoot sightings in the United States and Canada.

   Bigfoot has been written about for years. In 1925, Zane Grey wrote an article in Oregon Trail Magazine describing the encounter some miners had with what they described as two giant forest monsters, who looked like ape-men. Native Americans saw Bigfoot as a spiritual being and included it in their totem poles.

   Doug’s interest in the legend of Bigfoot has been strong for over thirty years. His first recollection was in the 1970s when he read about the hairy ape-man in Missouri called Mo Mo – Missouri Monster. When he was just out of high school, he read in the newspaper about a meeting that Don Keating was having about Bigfoot so he attended.

Doug FOotprint Casts

Casts of footprints were on display from Ohio and California.

   Things got serious when he joined the staff of the Guernsey County Public Library. During his 23 years working there, he would read two or three books about Bigfoot at a time. Once he read all the local ones, he began ordering them in from other libraries. Another staff member, Shawna Parks, also found the subject interesting and investigated stories with Doug.

   Then a popular local couple had an experience at Salt Fork State Park in August of 2004 that really spurred his interest. They had seen a large creature near the grounds where they were camping. It had many of the characteristics of Bigfoot including that distinct odor that resembles rotten eggs. It was the first local spotting that could be investigated. This area is now known as Bigfoot Ridge and is a primitive campground and picnic area.

Bigfoot sign

This sign displays its name and symbol at many events.

   In 2008, Doug formed a group called Southeastern Ohio Society for Bigfoot Investigation. The main focus of the group is to give a safe venue for Bigfoot eyewitnesses to come together to share their encounters and experiences. Many witnesses are reluctant to tell of their experience due to ridicule. Most say it has changed their life. Some never hunted again or even went into the woods. Others moved from the country where they had always lived to ensure safety.

Doug Speaking about Bigfoot

Doug uses a slideshow to share stories of Bigfoot.

   Now Doug frequently gives lectures in six or seven different states about these experiences and holds campouts at spots where the mysterious Bigfoot happens to frequent. Investigators meet there around a campfire and many stay for the weekend looking for evidence of footprints, hair, and rough structures.

Bigfoot Campout Salt Fork

Campouts are held during the summer months at Salt Fork State Park.

   Often during the evening, they hear screams, wood knocks, rocks are thrown, and trees twisted. Branches are frequently found arranged into a simple structure. When tracks are found, they make a case of them for future reference. Some of Bigfoot’s favorite paths include railroad tracks, streams, and power lines.

Bigfoot structure Salt Fork State Park

This structure, thought to be made by Bigfoot, was found near Salt Fork Lake.

   One interesting tale happened in Belmont County with a family who lived in the country. The dad worked in the deep coal mines on a swing shift so that meant that mom and the four children were often alone at night. That’s when Bigfoot would pay a visit. He would scream and pound on the walls.

   One evening something was hiding in the loft of the barn. The mother fired a shot and heard the creature running away. Another night Bigfoot got into the basement. The mother could hear him breathing and smelled that wretched smell before she called the sheriff as well as her husband at work. Her husband came home twenty miles to find her guarding the door with her gun and the children hiding behind her skirt. No trace was found of Bigfoot.

Doug Footprint Comparison

Another Bigfoot speaker, David Wickham, shows a size comparison between a Bigfoot and human footprint.

   There are many ideas of who Bigfoot really is but no one has the answer. Some feel he’s linked to the caveman. Others think he’s an interdimensional being or believe that there is an extraterrestrial connection. One theory says that Bigfoot appears due to the electromagnetic effects of UFOs as the two are frequently seen together. Research continues!

Doug Books

Doug has written four books in which he shares people’s Bigfoot stories.

   Doug has written four books about Bigfoot stories that have been shared with him and has a start on number five. Some share anonymously as they fear ridicule from friends and family. His mission is to record these stories for posterity. There have been sightings recorded in 49 of the 50 states. Hawaii is the only one without enough evidence to be listed.

Doug - Books at Stillions Market

Purchase one of Doug’s books from Tyler at Center Market on Route 22 as you head to Salt Fork State Park.

   He receives phone calls from all over the country these days and hears many interesting experiences. But Doug remarked, “I hope I haven’t gotten the most interesting one yet.”

   Just because you haven’t seen it, doesn’t mean it’s not there.

To contact Doug, you can email him at southeasternohiobigfoot@yahoo.com or message him on the Southeastern Ohio Society for Bigfoot Investigation Facebook page.

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Salt Fork Arts & Crafts Festival Celebrates 50 Years – August 9-11, 2019

50th LogoArtists, Entertainers, and lovers of the arts have been attending the Salt Fork Arts & Crafts Festival for 50 years. It’s come a long way from that preliminary festival, which was held on the courthouse lawn.

Musical Group R

Entertainment at that first festival was provided by “The Group” with Mike McWilliams, front, Don Mercer, Mike Kennedy, Mike McVicker, and Dale Brenning.

   The one-day downtown Salt Fork Arts Festival was sponsored by the Greater Cambridge Arts Council with Dr. Milton Thompson the president and Don Mercer serving as coordinator. Its goal was to promote all the arts including acting, music, literature, and art. The Best of Show that year went to Nancy Lewis of New Concord for a still life. The evening was spent dancing in the First National Bank parking lot.

Sue Dodd R

Sue Dodd demonstrated her painting skills under a tree at the park at an early festival.

   August 14-17, 1969, the festival moved to the Cambridge City Park as a four-day event. It was advertised as the First Salt Fork Arts & Crafts Festival. That year the newspaper stated there were four tents and 65 artists. Entertainment varied from YMCA Gymnasts and Bexley Puppet Theater to Cambridge Barbershoppers and Sweet Adelines.

Jack Taylor saying thanks R

Jack Taylor says thanks to Bob Amos, Lois Craig and Art Marr who had major roles in that first Salt Fork Arts & Crafts Festival.

   Arthur Marr served as chairman of that first official festival with assistance from Bob and Hannah Amos and Mrs. Lois Craig. Mrs. Claude Nickerson and her committee were in charge of the artists while Bill Coffey handled the performing arts. The Cambridge CB React Club took charge of parking and patrolling. Pavlov Music provided background organ and piano music and Scott Funeral Home provided seating. It was a real community effort.

SFF Fences

In the early years, paintings were displayed on snow fences.

   The Cambridge National Honor Society and members of the Key Club helped by setting up chairs, tables and snow fences. In those early festival days, pictures by artists and student artists were hung on snow fences for display. Young artists have always been a popular and important feature of the festival.

SFF Laura and Rodgers

Pictured at a reception at the Lekorenos home are Shannon Rodgers, Laura Bates (wearing a Rodgers/Silverman dress creation) and Jerry Silverman. Photo by George Lekorenos.

   It was in 1969 that Newcomerstown native, Shannon Rodgers, renowned dress designer for Hollywood stars, gave a donation to the festival and in 1971 began sponsoring the Shannon Rodgers Award. This award was open to all artists at the festival and was voted on by the public. When this endowment ended, the award became the People’s Choice Award.

Mary Beam

Mary Beam painted a picture of the courthouse from her front porch.

   Craftsmen demonstrating their crafts at those early festivals included basket weavers, blacksmiths, ceramic artists, woodcarvers, ironworkers, gem cutters, leather workers and many more. This was to be only the beginning of many years of outstanding juried art at the festival with only hand-made pieces of art being accepted.

SFF Paula Burlingame, Sandy Carle and Bonnie Perkins - Children's Art Fair

Paula Burlingame, Sandy Carle, and Bonnie Perkins make plans for the Children’s Art Fair.

   Crafts were a popular addition at those early festivals as well. In 1971, classes in macrame, woodcarving, leaded glass and apple dolls were popular. Adults enjoyed making quilted potholders and stained glass hangings. Everyone felt a sense of accomplishment.

Lekorenos-4X5

Marie Lekorenos, local artist and passionate supporter, kept scrapbooks of those first festivals. Those scrapbooks supplied most of the information in this article.

   In those early years, the Pilot Club, an international service club of women, served as volunteers to give artisans a break while selling their wares. Kiwanis, Lions, and Rotary provided refreshments on the midway selling hot dogs, ice cream, sno-cones, and cotton candy. Church groups, YMCA, and the hospital auxiliary had food stands available in the big pavilion for hungry visitors.

SFF Dick SImcox Big Band 1980

The Dick Simcox Big Band appeared several years at the festival.

   Entertainment included many musical groups as well as a performing arts group from Salt Fork Barn Theatre performing excerpts from “You’re a Good Man Charlie Brown”. Cambridge Community Theater also did several children’s presentations. Even the Cleveland Opera Theater came several years and performed “Barber of Seville”.

SFF Frankie Yankovic America's Polka King

Frankie Yankovic, Polka King, drew one of the largest crowds ever.

   A performance that many remember was that of Frankie Yankovic, America’s Polka King. Frankie played the accordion and had two gold records – “Blue Skirt Waltz” and “Just Because”. The crowd for this performance was the largest ever remembered at the festival.

Carol and Bob R

Carol and Bob Jones were singing at the festival years ago. Carol is now Festival Director and Bob is Entertainment Coordinator.

   Back in 1986, Bob and Carol Jones presented a musical program at the festival. Today Carol is the Festival Director and Bob is Entertainment Coordinator. Their enthusiasm for the 50th Anniversary has led to a memorial “Pedestrian Gateway” being constructed at the park at a point where most visitors enter.

Briani Gray R

Brian Gray and his wooden toys have been an attraction over the years.

   While it has been great fun to look back at those early years of the festival, it’s also pleasing to know that it still has the same basic roots. The Salt Fork Arts & Crafts Festival continues to be a juried festival with several artists from those early days still displaying their art.

Russ and Virginia (2)

Russ Shaffer and Virginia Price have displayed at the festival since its early years and will be there this year. Virginia just celebrated her 99th birthday.

   Entertainment continues every hour in the Performing Arts Tent or the Big Pavilion. Craft classes for students and adults are held in the small pavilion throughout the weekend. Admission and parking are still free.

   Set aside some time to join the 50th Anniversary celebration this August 9 -11. Wander through the artist displays in beautiful Cambridge City Park. Have lunch or pick up a snack as you sit and listen to some fine entertainment provided by talented vocalists and bands. Don’t forget to find a special treasure to take home with you to remember this special anniversary.

   50 years is cause for celebration! Make plans to attend this memorable occasion.

The Salt Fork Arts & Crafts Festival is held annually the second weekend of August in the Cambridge City Park in Cambridge, Ohio. Cambridge is located at the crossroads of I-70 and I-77. There are several exits so watch for signs leading to the festival or the city park.

Riding the Rails – A Father’s Day Story

Rudy WencekHobo Rule No. 1: Decide your own life. Don’t let another person rule you.

Young boys thoughts often turn to adventure when they have nothing else to occupy their mind. Such was the case with my dad, Rudy, when he was a young teenager.

   His parents had died when he was but a young child so he lived with his sister and her family. At a very young age, he began working at Cambridge Glass Company and took pleasure in seeing the sand turned into beautiful glass objects.

   However, there were days when the glass company was not busy. Sometimes workers would sit outside and pitch pennies while waiting to see if there was a job for them that day.

   On days when there was no work, Dad often hopped on a train as it slowed down for the crossing near the glass plant. How he enjoyed the freedom to explore as he rode those trains from New York City to Chicago and all the places in between.

   This happy-go-lucky train hopper often told of the friendly people he met in his travels and the other ‘hobos’ who were riding the rails. They always shared their food, clothes and sometimes their cigarettes.

   Picture Dad in his ‘hunky cap’, gray work shirt and pants, and maybe a few dollars in his pocket. Perhaps he stopped in a hobo jungle to share a can of beans or mulligan stew with other wanderers. Life was simple on the rails so not much was needed.

   It’s interesting to know that in 1915 there were a million hobos in The United States. By 1930 when Dad was riding the rails, that number had increased to over two million.

   There were many ways of hopping on a train. They might find an empty boxcar, hop on between cars, grab a railing and climb to the top, or even ride under the train. These young and vigorous men had plenty of nerve.

   Clicking his fingers, Dad often said, “If I hadn’t met Kate, I would probably have ridden those trains all the way to the Pacific Ocean.” But marriage and full-time employment at Cambridge Glass Company stopped his riding the rails

   While Dad never rode the rails again, he still enjoyed driving anywhere Mom would go. Sunday drives always took us on adventures in every direction. Perhaps Dad set the stage for my being a gypsy.

This story was in our local newspaper as part of our Rainy Day Writers tribute to Father’s Day. It is a true story of his early life that my Dad liked to share with his grandsons. Dad went on to be co-owner of a local glass company, Variety Glass, so the glass industry played a large role in his life.

Have a Hoppy Day on the Hopalong Cassidy Trail

Hoppy's Hendrysburg Home

The Boyds’ old home in Hendrysburg is still standing today.

William Boyd began his life in 1895 in the small town of Hendrysburg at the edge of Belmont County. His parents moved to Cambridge when he was but a youngster.

Hopalong East End School

William Boyd attended East Side School in Cambridge until he was twelve.

   Their home was on Steubenville Avenue and he walked to school at East Side School. William Boyd always referred to Cambridge as his “home”.

Second Presbyterian Church

His family attended Second Presbyterian Church in Cambridge.

   The Boyd family attended the Second Presbyterian Church on West 8th Street in Cambridge. Today that church is the Southern Hills Baptist Fellowship.

   As a teenager, the family moved to Tulsa, Oklahoma where his father worked as a day laborer. When his father died in 1913, William moved to California where he did everything from an orange picker to a surveyor and auto salesman.

   Because of his stunning good looks, charm and charisma, he soon became an extra in Hollywood movies. Cecil B. DeMille, who became his lifelong friend, arranged for Boyd’s first leading role in a silent film in 1918 at $25 per week.

Hopalong on Topper

Hopalong Cassidy, cowboy legend, appeared with his horse, Topper, in 52 television episodes

   His role as Hopalong Cassidy appeared in 1935 with the film “Hop-Along Cassidy” based on a character created by Clarence Mulford in a 1912 novel. Throughout the rest of his life, he was best known for his cowboy role as Hopalong Cassidy of Bar 20 ranch and called “Pride of the West”. In his black cowboy hat riding on his white horse, Topper, William Boyd starred as Hopalong Cassidy in 66 movies.

Laura with Hoppy cut out

Laura stands alongside a life-size cutout of Hopalong in a room filled with his memorabilia.

   For 25 years, Laura Bates, the best friend that Hoppy ever had, organized a Hoppy Festival each May to honor this hometown cowboy, who went on to be a movie and television star. She also displayed her vast collection of memorabilia at the Hopalong Cassidy Museum, which is no longer in existence.

Laura at Country Bits

Laura Bates checks the display of her memorabilia in the window of Country Bits.

   Today some of that memorabilia is on display in a window at Country Bits in downtown Cambridge on the corner of Wheeling Avenue and 7th Street and in a couple of other stores downtown. Look carefully in store windows and on building walls to find memories of Hoppy.

Laura Full Mural

This mural by Sue Dodd captures Hoppy’s life from “Hendrysburg to Hollywood”.

   As you enter Downtown Cambridge on Southgate Parkway, take a glance to the left to see a beautiful mural done by local artist, Sue Dodd. This depicts the life of William Boyd entitled “Hendrysburg to Hollywood” with accurate information and detailed pictures.

hoppy-talk

Laura shared this copy of the first edition of “Hoppy Talk”, which she wrote and distributed.

   A great place to start your Hoppy Adventure would be the Guernsey County Senior Center where there is a bronze statue of Hopalong Cassidy. When the festival ended, Laura wanted to be sure his memory lived on in the area so with the help of many Hoppy friends, she raised funds to have a statue created.

Hoppy and Alan

Alan Cottrill, the sculptor, stands beside the bronze statue he created of Hopalong Cassidy.

   Wanting only the best, she contacted Alan Cottrill of Zanesville, whose statues appear around the world. Funds were raised and dedication of the statue took place in June 2016. Fans stop by often and if you’re lucky, you might find Laura Bates there to tell some Hoppy stories.

Hoppy Monument

Hoppy look-alikes from Alabama, Ohio, California, and North Carolina proudly stand by a monument to Hopalong Cassidy on the grounds of his former elementary school.

   At the corner of Wheeling Avenue and Highland Avenue, there is a monument dedicated in 1992 at the site of the school William Boyd attended. In the early 1900s, it was called East Side School, which later became Park School. When a new school was built there in 1956, William Boyd donated money for playground equipment. He always kept in touch with his hometown.

Hoppy Grace

A picture of Grace Boyd, Hoppy’s wife, can be found at the Guernsey County Senior Center.

   When Grace Boyd, Hoppy’s wife, came to the festival, she always made a stop at Park School. Children looked forward to her visit as the beautiful, charming lady had great stories to share. Her picture can still be found at the Guernsey County Senior Center.

   If you look closely, you’ll also see little bits of Hoppy’s history in unexpected places. At the Christ Our Light Parish, there is an engraved brick on the patio in his memory. In Northwood Cemetery, there is a monument to his brother, Frances Marion Boyd, who was born in Cambridge June 13, 1906, and died December 29, 1906.

hopalong-cassidy and Topper   William Boyd didn’t sing, dance, or play sports. He simply became Hopalong Cassidy, the Gentleman of the Bar 20, who smiled, waved and shook hands. Hoppy was everyone’s Mr. Good Guy and his favorite drink was nonalcoholic sarsaparilla.

   Thanks to Laura Bates and the Friends of Hoppy, the memory of William Boyd, best known as Hopalong Cassidy, will live on for generations in Cambridge.

Life is an Adventure for Jo Lucas Master Gardener of the Year 2018

 

Jo Turkey hunting 001

Turkey hunting has been a long time family tradition.

Everywhere she goes, Jo Lucas finds something to enjoy. For her, life is discovering new things on a daily basis. Part of this she credits to meeting the love of her life, Don Lucas, who had a spirit of adventure like no other.

   Their adventure began in Cody, Wyoming where they were married…with an elk hunt for a honeymoon. Since then hunting, fishing, gardening and many other activities filled their lives until just recently when Don died as a result of an accident.

   Their adventures could fill a book and have created many fond memories for her. They made friends wherever they went.

Jo with bear 001

Don and Jo with the bear she shot in New Hampshire.

   In New Hampshire, they both shot a bear and the bearskins still hang in her house today. She was sitting in a log yard when a bear appeared lumbering through the logs, getting closer and closer. She decided there was no choice but to shoot it and killed it with one shot.

   But bears aren’t the only thing on her hit list. Moose, elk, antelope, turkeys and other small game have all been part of her adventures from Maine to Alaska. She’s visited 49 of the 50 states with Hawaii still on her bucket list.

Jo Ice Fishing 001

Ice fishing in Maine was a very cold but fun experience.

   Ice fishing in Maine provided an unusual experience as temperatures were down to -20 and -30 degrees when they took a snowmobile out on the ice. Sometimes when they were ice fishing, they had a portable shanty to use as a windbreak. In Alaska, salmon fishing captured their attention.

Jo Cooking Tent 001

Their cooking tent is packed with supplies.

   Sometimes they used a camper, but most often tents. They had a special cook tent and then several sleeping tents a short distance away just in case an animal would decide to invade the cook tent overnight. Two dogs and a pistol kept her feeling a little safer wherever she happened to camp.

Jo Farmers Market

Jo sold her salsa and jams at the local Farmers’ Market.

   Back home in Guernsey County, Jo enjoyed large gardens and a fruit orchard. From these, she made delicious salsas and jams that she sold at the Farmers’ Market during the summer season.

   As a youngster, she grew up in the 4-H program in the Millersburg area, where horses were her passion and project. But on Thanksgiving, everyone went turkey hunting. It was a family tradition!

Jo salmon 001

Fishing for salmon in Alaska was a real success.

   Since Jo’s move to Guernsey County, she has been involved in the community in so many ways. Jo was the auxiliary president who brought back the idea for Wonderland of Trees at the hospital. That first year, there were six trees and six wreaths.

Jo fruit trees covered

Fruit trees are covered with parachutes to keep birds from eating the fruit.

   Other community organizations that are lucky to have her assistance are the Soil & Water Conservation Board (vice-chairman), Ohio Association of Garden Clubs (district treasurer), Mt. Herman Church (treasurer), Hopewell Homemakers, and Adair Ladies Bible Study at Antrim. Perhaps it should be mentioned that Jo has a degree in accounting.

Jo Raspberries 001

Her raspberry patch is used for jams, pies, or just a bowl of berries!

   In the last couple of years, she decided to go back to that early passion from 4-H of training and showing horses. These days she assists at Breaking Free Therapeutic Riding Center near Norwich. This facility helps the handicapped improve their physical, psychological and cognitive behaviors through association with a friendly horse. Veterans are always welcome.

   Working here has given Jo real pleasure as she volunteers as barn manager. She gets horses ready for riding by exercising them beforehand. Yes, sometimes she even rides herself.

Jo Tomatoes 001

Her delicious salsa was made possible through this large tomato patch.

   Jo Lucas loves the out-of-doors in so many ways but gardening is one of her favorites. She was recently named OSU Extension Guernsey County Master Gardener of 2018, a well-deserved honor. Jo was one of those original Guernsey County Master Gardeners.

   She remembers her days in 4-H and all the help the advisors gave, so felt it was her turn to “give back” to the community. She has shared her knowledge of gardening with hundreds of Guernsey County elementary school children.

Jo Cherry Tree Pruning

These trees were used to demonstrate proper pruning methods.

   Ag school days, master gardener classes and workshops are a few of the ways that she has given back. Over the past few years, she has hosted three pruning workshops at her home.

Jo Lucas and Clif Little

Clif Little presents Jo with the Master Gardener of the Year Award.

   Local OSU Extension Educator, Clif Little, praised Jo by saying, “I can sum up her work as a Master Gardener volunteer as hard-working, energetic, friendly, generous and very interested in learning. She is the type of person that will always help when we offer gardening classes.” That says it all!

Jo Flowers 001

This flower bed contains crazy daisies, daylilies and iris.

But one place that Jo is a bit dangerous is in a plant nursery. She enjoys trying new plants and searches for them wherever she goes. Sometimes she comes home with almost too many.

   There are still a few places on her bucket list and both relate to ancestry. Her grandparents came from Austria and Ireland so those are two places she would enjoy exploring.

Bear Skin 2

This bearskin hanging on her wall at home makes her smile as she remembers her adventures.

   Of one thing you can be certain, Jo Lucas will not be sitting in a rocking chair watching the world go by. She’s always ready for an adventure as she strives to learn something new each day.

If you have interest in becoming a Master Gardener in Guernsey County, contact Clif Little in the Guernsey County Extension Office at 740-489-5300.

The Cambridge Singers Have a Song in Their Heart

Cambridge Singers 2017

The present Cambridge Singers often dress eloquently for their performances.

Music makes the world a happier place. If you enjoy singing around the house or while driving your car, perhaps you’d like to join The Cambridge Singers, either singing as a member or listening in the audience.

Kathy Turner, Cambridge Singers director

Kathy Antill, the director, brings experience and new energy to the group.

   The unique sound created by The Cambridge Singers sets them apart from traditional groups. This wonderful group of singers is the oldest continually operating six-part harmony chorus in the state. Recently Kathryn Antill took over the helm of directing this elite group.  Tom Apel accompanies them on the piano.

Singers Fred Waring Award 001 (2)

This 1955 Waring Award was the beginning of “The Cambridge Singers”.

   It all began with a group called “Musigals”, a group of married women who loved to sing. Then in 1965, they decided to add some men to the chorus for a special show. It was suggested that they enter the Fred Waring Sacred Heart Program Choral Competition by sending in a tape for critique.

Singers Fred Waring Trophy 001 (2)

The Fred Waring trophy still brings a feeling of pride and accomplishment.

   They won first prize and a beautiful trophy in the mixed ensemble category over a field of entries from all over the United States and Canada. Their award-winning rendition of “O Sacred Heart” was heard on 875 television and radio stations.

   With that kind of success, they drew up a charter for the group, and officially became “The Cambridge Singers” in November, 1965 under the direction of Donna Shafer Blackwood. Their first concert under that name occurred at Easter of 1966 in The First Presbyterian Church.

Singers Salt Fork Lodge 001 (2)

Sometimes the chorus harmonizes outside Salt Fork Lodge

   This chorus has sung every kind of music and entertained audiences around the state. Their performances have included: AmeriFlora, the Columbus Symphony Orchestra, Miss Clayland Pageant, and Barnesville Pumpkin Show.

Singers Carnegie Hall 001 (2)

The chorus had a happy time at Carnegie Hall.

  In 1991, The Cambridge Singers performed at Carnegie Hall during their 100th-anniversary celebration accompanied by the Manhattan Philharmonic. This talented group is proud to have been invited back, and hope to make a repeat trip in the near future.

   In the lifetime of the chorus, there have been over 130 community members who have participated with eight different directors and three accompanists. They practice each Tuesday at First Presbyterian Church. 

Marge Stover

Marge Stover, back center, has been with the group from its beginning.

   One member, Marge Stover, happens to be the only charter member of the group still performing. She shares with her family a great musical background and was pleased when asked to join the group. Marge not only has a beautiful voice but has helped with every aspect of the singers at one time or another from costumes to set design.

Singers Mayor's Award 001 (2)

The late Mayor Sam Salupo presents former Director Jim Whitehair with the Mayor’s Award about ten years ago.

   Costumes are of great importance and they are pleased that the Kiwanis Foundation and Rotary Club have given them grants, which they used for costumes. The Rotary Club has also given a grant for music in honor of the late Dr. Quentin Knauer, who sang in the chorus for fifty years. The chorus sincerely appreciates all the support they receive from the community.

Singers Go Patriotic 001 (2)

The Cambridge Singers added some choreography to this patriotic tune.

   Each year, The Cambridge Singers have a spring show and one at Christmas, both of them being at the Scottish Rite Auditorium in downtown Cambridge. The chorus has performed at nearly every Salt Fork Festival and their Christmas appearance at the Guernsey County Senior Center plays to a standing room only crowd.

The Cambridge Singers

The Cambridge Singers performed at the 48th Salt Fork Festival.

   While memorable performances are their main goal, members feel the group is an extended family, who gives them support during troubled times. When attending the Tuesday rehearsals, all troubles disappear for two hours as they harmonize in song. Music heals the mind, body and soul.

Singers Children 001 (2)

Children of chorus members take part in the annual Christmas program.

   This group has a special interest in encouraging young people to become involved in the world of music. Each year they present several scholarships to area youth. The prestigious Rigel Award is given in memory of Everett “Red” and Mary Ann Rigel, both long-time members of Cambridge Singers. This honors a community member who promotes and advocates music, music education and the importance of the arts in all walks of life.

   If you have an interest in joining The Cambridge Singers or have other questions about the group, contact any member or call Janet Teichman at 740-638-2220 or Gayle Roberts at 740-680-1723. They will welcome you with open arms and a song in their heart.

   The Cambridge Singers’ wish is to promote music and the musical quality of life in our community. Most of all, they love music.

FMJ Indoor Shooting Range Promotes Firearm Education and Safety

fmj shooting rangeTo become good at anything takes practice. Shooting is no exception.

   The FMJ Indoor Shooting Range has only been around for a couple years, but its popularity has caught on quickly. Phil and Stephanie Lappert were vacationing in Missouri several years ago when they noticed indoor shooting ranges at several places. They brought that idea back to Guernsey County and built a new facility on Glenn Highway just west of Cambridge.

fmj staff (2)

Experienced staff includes Justin Wilson, manager Dave Scurlock, owners Stephanie and Phil Lappert and Shane Lappert.

   An important function of FMJ is their concealed carry classes, which are held each month. After completing this eight-hour class, an applicant must then file an application with the Ohio Attorney General. Before a license is issued, an extensive background check takes place.

fmj map

This map is colored coded to enable students to see which states recognize an Ohio concealed carry license.

   First Shots, an introduction to shooting, is frequently held at the facility so check their schedule for available dates. You never forget your first shots, and FMJ would be the perfect place for that experience. The seminar will include safety instructions, information on gun ownership requirements, and recreational uses. If you’ve been thinking of giving shooting a try, this is a great opportunity.

fmj stalls

Thirteen computerized shooting stalls give an opportunity for practice.

   This state of the art indoor shooting range has 13 lanes, each having a maximum distance of 25′. Each lane features Fusion Targets, a digital motorized target placement material so the shooter can set the distance he wants to practice and the target will automatically be placed there. Important ear and eye protection are always available.

   If you’re trying to decide on what gun to purchase, here’s the place to rent a gun just for practice to see if it fits your purpose.

fmn lightning works gun repair

FMJ’s Lightning Works Gun Repair features an ultrasonic gun cleaning machine.

   This isn’t just a place for shooting though, as they also have a gunsmith room, Lightning Works, to make needed minor repairs to guns. Included is an ultrasonic gun cleaning machine.

fmj black rifle coffee

Black Rifle Coffee would make a great gift for any outdoorsman.

   Their store has a wide variety of firearms, ammunition, firearm parts and accessories. You’ll be surprised at some of the things that you’ll find there from stun guns and pepper spray to tee shirts and Black Rifle Coffee.

fmj cambridge writers

Members of Cambridge Writers recently held a field trip there to gather information for their mystery novels. Pictured are Orval Gosnell, manager Dave, Cindy Stonebrook, Barbara Allen, and Paulette Forshey.

   Dave Scurlock, the manager, presented an educational slide show that gave background information and was required viewing for all applying for a concealed carry license. Their Training and Conference Center holds up to 90 people and can be rented for business meetings.

fmj dave shooting lane

Dave explains safety regulations and instructions for setting targets in each lane.

   Dave grew up shooting and fishing so loves the outdoor sports. He introduced his granddaughter to her first rifle at the age of four. Dave thinks that everyone should know how to handle a gun properly. He recommends shooting fifty rounds a month for better aim. “Practice, practice, practice.”

fmj bullets

Dave explained different bullet types and sizes as well as the benefits and weaknesses of each.

   When being attacked, it is recommended to aim for a large part of the body. “Aim small, miss small” is a slogan they follow. Revolvers are most reliable but they don’t recommend a lady carrying one in her purse.

fmj pepper spray

They highly recommend that ladies carry pepper spray with them.

   In its place, ladies might carry a taser gun or pepper spray to defend themselves. It’s available at their store in varying strengths. The pepper spray that can carry for 10′ is most desirable as it can even stop a rattlesnake or bear.

   A wide variety of people come to the facility for many different reasons. Many teachers are coming here for their concealed carry permit since school boards have seen the need to approve having someone on staff to carry in case of emergency. School boards that have approved include Caldwell, Cambridge, East Guernsey, Rolling Hills and Shenandoah.

fmj handicapped stall

One lane is specifically designated for handicapped use.

   Men and women participate at the shooting range but staff reported that as a whole, women shot 90% better than the men. People often come in wheelchairs and have a special handicapped lane in which to practice. Their oldest frequent visitor is an 80-year-old man, who served in Vietnam.

fmj gun history

In their showroom, the history of guns is honored through this personal collection.

   Their facility had some surprise uses in my opinion. Birthday parties, bachelor parties, and family reunions find FMJ the perfect place to meet and have a little target practice. My suggestion was a divorce party, but that hasn’t happened yet.

fmj remington rattlesnake

A bit of artwork in the form of “Rattlesnake” by Frederic Remington graces the counter.

   At FMJ, you can target practice, purchase firearms, have services of a gunsmith and receive training. Their staff has years of experience in the firearms industry so can give good guidance when needed.

   Stop by FMJ Indoor Shooting Range on Tuesday through Saturday from 10:00–5:00 to learn more about gun safety and perhaps practice shooting a little yourself. Practice makes gun safety perfect.

FMJ Indoor Range and Training Center is located at 6653 Glenn Highway on Route 40 west of Cambridge, Ohio. If you are coming in on I-70 take exit 176, then take a right at the light. Check out their website at www.fmjrange.com

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