Places to go and things to see by Gypsy Bev

Archive for the ‘Ohio’ Category

Billy Jacobs Art Gallery – Home to Country Folk Art

Billy relaxes in his gallery

Billy relaxed in his gallery as he talked about his journey.

A country boy at heart describes Billy Jacobs, a man with a great variety of creative skills. Today he is best known for his rural scene paintings, which can be found around the world and at his studio, Billy Jacobs Gallery, in Navarre, Ohio. (more…)

John Glenn Grad, Chris Jones, Living His Dream

Chris Jones behind camera

Chris Jones worked behind the camera filming “I See You” with Helen Hunt.

When dreams come true, a person’s life becomes more meaningful. Each day has a purpose. Chris Jones never wanted to do anything other than make movies. He wasn’t sure what his role might be in those early years, but he loved movies. His journey from New Concord to Hollywood has been a great adventure.

Chris child

Movies and their stories caught his eye even as a child.

   About the age of nine, Chris saw “Jaws”, which stirred his imagination. A little later, “A Nightmare on Elm Street” made him wonder, “The things are not real, but look real. How did that work? How can make-believe be so real?”

   It wasn’t long before Chris had his dad’s camera on his shoulder and began filming. He and a friend might use gasoline to have a model car explode on their driveway. Fog was created using a humidifier and of course, blood was really ketchup. But Chris liked being in control of the action of the film. At one point in his early years, he had three cameras he could use.

Dad, Chris and Mom

Visited Bob, Chris, and Carol in a casual setting one Sunday afternoon.

   He credits a lot of the reason for his success to his parents, Robert and Carol Jones. “They never for a second steered me away from the process of filming. Thanks to Mom and Dad for all their help.”

Chris High School play

He played an active role in high school in movies and performances.

   Another person that always encouraged him was a high school teacher, Mary Ann DeVolld. “She was super supportive and willing to let me do things that fueled my passion for movies.” Chris made a movie instead of giving his book report, even though he said he received a B for not following directions.

   Mrs. DeVolld remembers Chris in her Media class, where he filmed and edited a video about the senior class. It allowed Chris to do what he loved as he was always talking about making films with his friends. In Mrs. DeVolld’s opinion, “I really believed that if Chris could make the right connections, he could become a serious filmmaker.”

Jones Family

The Jones Family often sang at Muskingum Alumni Weekend.

   After high school, Chris attended Muskingum College for a couple of years but then headed to a film school at North Carolina School of Arts, one of the tops in the world for film making. Here he was able to make practical application of techniques learned instead of just studying about them. Chris wanted the freedom to do his own thing.

   Even the simplest scene takes a lot of craftsmanship and design by the writers. It takes so much work and control to make each scene come alive.

Chris at film festival

Chris was chosen to represent his film school at the Tribeca Film Festival.

   While at film school, Chris wrote and did the cinematography for his own film, “Roadside Convenience”, which was selected to represent the school at the Tribeca Film Festival. Putting a film together in Chris’s eyes is pure magic, “It’s an artistic miracle.”

Jones Cowboys

Chris, Grayson, and Bob donned their cowboy hats at a Salt Fork Festival performance.

   When asked what he does in his spare time, Chris smiled, “Watch movies!” But once in a while he also takes to the ski slopes, does a little white water rafting and has begun working on the engines of motorcycles. Even the things he does for relaxation seem exciting.

I See You

   Recently he was in Cleveland shooting a thriller, “I See You”, which stars Helen Hunt. This film was released on December 6 in a streaming platform. His role this time was the first assistant cameraman, where he had to make certain he captured just the right feeling for the scene.

   It’s especially exciting for Chris to be working just up the road from where he grew up. He’s been working on other films in Ohio, such as “10 Minutes Gone” with Bruce Willis in Cincinnati for prime video and “All the Bright Places” with Elle Fanning in Cleveland to be released on Netflix.

Grey's Anatomy

   He feels so lucky to be working in an industry that he had dreams of working in as a child. Currently, Chris is working as a cinematographer/1st Assistant Camera on Grey’s Anatomy and his first episode has already been televised. Even though he spends many twelve-hour days, he loves the process. Plain and simple, Chris glows when he says, “I love movies.”

Opening 2018 Chris

Chris, with his son Grayson, sang “The Star-Spangled Banner” to open the Salt Fork Festival.

   He’s definitely living his childhood dream. His hope for the future would be in the role of producer. Wouldn’t he be a great asset to a film with all his background knowledge? “Being on set is very exciting. I wouldn’t trade it for anything. I never want to do anything else.”

   Keep living your dream, Chris!

Find Handmade Unique Gifts at Jane’s Dolls & Things

Jane Booth

Jane currently has a booth at Deal Busters Marketplace in Byesville.

Dolls, bears, and doll clothes are just a few of the things created by Jane Parks of Kimbolton. When she talks about her creations, you can tell by the sparkle in her eyes that she truly enjoys what she does.

Jane Barbie dress

She got her start at making doll dresses with clothes for Barbie.

   She remembers those first clothes she made back when she was fifteen. That was a time when Barbie dolls were very popular. Jane made clothes for Barbie and sold them to children on the school bus. That year she made enough money to buy Christmas presents for the entire family.

   For a while, life took over and Jane was busy with work and family. She did find time to make some doll clothes for her daughter.

   1978 was the year when she became more interested in making dolls and their clothes. She and her husband, Bill, were at a Steam Engine Show where they saw someone selling doll clothes in one of the booths. Bill told Jane that her doll clothes looked much better and she should try selling hers.

Jane doll dress

Creating a fancy pinafore for an 18″ doll takes much time.

   That next year, Jane took all the things she had made to the Steam Engine Show at Stumptown. She sat on the tailgate of an International Scout with her creations spread on wooden boards between two wooden horses. She charged fifty cents a dress and made $40 in four hours. She was hooked! Her business, Jane’s Dolls & Things began.

   One of the first patterns she purchased was for a Shirley Temple doll as that doll had always been special to her. She still has that doll at home but it looks rather rough compared to what she makes today.

Jane Katie Dolls

Her Katie Dolls are cheerful and soft to hold.

   Her file cabinet is now filled to overflowing with patterns for dolls and dresses. Of course, Jane adds her personal touch to each item. Her biggest challenge is finding just the right peach-colored fabric for skin tones on the dolls.

Jane Memory Bear

These Memory Bears were made from a loved one’s suit jacket.

   Memory Bear might be made from a pattern, but each bear takes on a different presence. These bears are made in memory of loved ones who are deceased. What a comfort to hold a bear that is dressed in the material from a favorite suit, dress, jeans or scrubs of your loved one.

Jane Memory bears.jpg

These are just a few of the requested Memory Bears.

   As a wife and grandmother, Jane has many chores that must be done but she smiled, “I’d rather be sewing.” If she was free, she could make ten Barbie pioneer dresses in one day. Or sometimes with interruptions, she could be working on a Memory Bear for a week. But there are times when she is so busy with orders that she can do nothing else.

Jane My Sweet Baby

My Sweet Baby has four faces that can be turned to match the mood.

   An unusual doll is called My Sweet Baby. This doll has four faces which can be turned to fit the mood of the child…or the adult! The sides include faces that are sleeping, angry, crying, and happy.

Jane dragons

Dragons have become popular with young boys and even teens.

   Jane also makes all the jewelry, shoes, and hats that go on the dolls. One of her most recent creations for the girls is a mermaid dress, which became popular after Disney’s “Little Mermaid.” Boys from child to teen prefer Elliott, the dragon.

Jane Wooden dogs

Layered wooden dogs, which look exactly like your dog or pet, can be made from pictures sent.

   Another recent venture has been making layered wooden animals. People will send her a picture of their dog or horse and she will make a small wooden replica that looks remarkably like the picture. What a talented lady!

   During the year, Jane and Bill set up her display at Roscoe Apple Butter Festival, Utica Ice Cream Festival, and the Caldwell Harvest Festival. Word of mouth from these and other festivals have sent many customers her direction. My first contact with Jane was at her Ohio State Fair display.

Jane Raggedy Sandy

Jane holds her Raggedy Sandy doll, who has a brother Raggedy Sam.

   Jane belongs to the Ohio Canal Doll Club, which makes dolls and clothes for children who have had traumatic events in their life. The Glad Rags of Strasburg usually make doll clothes, but this year they had a special project of making dresses out of pillowcases to send to the young girls in Africa.

   What would a dollmaker collect? Dolls! But she also admits to having an overflowing collection of books. Jane has a great sense of humor about life, as she laughed, “I’m older than dirt and slower than molasses.”

Jane Tea cup doll

This tiny Tea Cup Doll gets its name from its teacup size.

   Her life is a busy one with three children, five grandchildren, and two great-grandchildren. Wesley Chapel is very important to her and she teaches Sunday School there as well as helps with many of the youth activities.

   Squeezing in time to make dolls, stuffed animals and their clothes is sometimes difficult, but the end result is appreciated by all her customers.

Jane doll in swing

Little girls like to play house with Doll in a Swing.

   Right now you can find her display at Deal Busters Marketplace on 2nd Street in Byesville. If you would like to get in touch with her personally call 740-498-8806 or email her at dollmakerparks9@gmail.com .

   Jane’s Doll’s & Things make so many special items that you’re almost certain to find something that would appeal to someone in your family – children or adults. You’re never too old for a teddy bear!

Memories of Christmas Past at Arms Family Museum

Arms Entrance

The Arms Family Museum presents “Memories of Christmas Past.”

By the Fireside” brings to life the traditions and decorations used during Christmastime many years ago. Picture yourself sitting by a warm fire with stockings hung from the mantle ready for Christmas surprises. There’s so much to see in seven rooms filled with Christmas of old that you’re sure to find memories that have been tucked away in your mind from years in the past.

Arms Fireplace with cards

This brought back memories of hanging Christmas cards around a cardboard brick fireplace.

   The Arms Family Museum in Youngstown presents its 12th annual “Memories of Christmas Past” from November 23 through Sunday, January 5, 2020. This display has been designed each year by the mastermind of Anthony Worrellia, who explores the world for new ideas and rare Christmas decorations. Each year the rooms take on a different theme which gives them a special glow.

Arms Sitting Room with feather tree and wooden toys

Their cozy sitting room had a feather tree and wooden toys.

   Anthony searches all year for the perfect items to display. He borrows from friends and acquaintances all over the country. His connections through a group of international Christmas collectors, The Golden Glow of Christmas Past, help him in his search for new ideas. A team of volunteers and staff begin setting up the displays in late September.

Arms Asian Dining Room

This Asian dining room was inspired by a Christmas card collection.

   His ideas might come from something as simple as a collection of Christmas cards and postcards. That happened this year when the cards led Anthony to create a dining room setting with an Asian and European touch.

Arms Honeycomb Santa

Honeycomb Santas, candles, snowmen and other decorations were available in the 1920s.

   A display of those old-fashioned honeycomb decorations from the 1920s caught my eye. Large red plastic bells hung throughout the exhibit that used to hang in the classroom. A favorite in the library was a seven and a half foot crystal tree containing over 2,000 crystals which was wrapped with blue lights creating a magical feeling.

Arms Crystal Tree

2,000 crystals shimmer in a field of blue lights.

   A fun Scavenger Hunt along the way had you looking carefully for a list of things to be found. Included were 4 snow dogs, an owl with a Santa hat, a bonsai tree, and as many elves as you could find. It also caused guests to interact with each other creating an all-round friendly atmosphere.

   The setting is perfect as it showcases the Greystone house built by Wilford and Olive Arms in 1905. Upon her death in 1960, Olive left the Mahoning Valley Historical Society her home and its contents with the stipulation that it be developed as the Arms Museum.

Arms Guide Cassie Christmas Card collection

Guide Cassie tells of the vintage Christmas card collection on display.

   While the first floor has Christmas in every corner, the second floor shows the mansion as it was when the Arms lived there. Children prefer the basement, which resembles an old log cabin, as this is the place where they experience hands-on activities.

Arms Sleigh 2

Don costumes for a great photo opportunity.

   In the lower level at “Santa’s Village,” children and adults enjoy getting dressed in Christmas costumes of Santa, elf, or drummer boy. All of these costumes are locally made. Santa’s sleigh, made by another local gentleman, gives the perfect background for a photo opportunity. There are craft tables also where you can make bead or paint chip tree ornaments, holiday cards, or even a miniature Greystone mansion.

Arms Mantle Scene

This mantle scene shows four dogs pulling a girl on a sled. All of them have coats of real fur.

   Catch the Christmas spirit as you stroll through the three floors of Arms Family Museum. Volunteers throughout are very helpful and answer questions easily. The museum is open Tuesday through Sunday from noon – 4:00 from now until January 5, 2020, with their display of “Memories of Christmas Past.” In January, they will be rearranging and cleaning to be ready to open the traditional mansion in February.

Arms Gift Shop

Their gift shop contained many vintage items.

   Admission is $10 for adults and $8 for children with toddlers under 3 being admitted at no charge. Active military, as well as military veterans, are always free. It’s quite a popular spot as over 8,000 people enjoyed the Christmas exhibit in 2018. Something new this year is permission to take pictures without a flash. Everyone enjoys photos of memorable places they visit.

  Arms Sign   Families have made “Memories of Christmas Past” a family tradition since there’s something new every year. Everyone will enjoy awakening memories and making new ones during a visit to the Arms Family Museum. The magic of Christmas never ends.

The Arms Family Museum is located in Youngstown, Ohio at 648 Wick Avenue. It is near the Youngstown State University campus so watch for their exit signs.

A Simpler Thyme Shares Uses for Herbs

Julia WelcomeFood should be your medicine and medicine should be your food.

Turning your passion into a business creates the perfect way to live. That’s what Julia Brown has done with her passion for herbs, which began with her grandmother. That country grandmother would go out to the garden, gather herbs and whip them up into something that would help their ailments. Julia’s passion and business became “A Simpler Thyme.”

Julia Garden with Doves

This section of her herb garden contained doves.

   While she picked up her love of using natural herbs from her grandmother, Julia never knew what her grandmother was combining. That took time and study by Julia over the past thirty years as she learned how to use herbs both in food and medicine.

Julia Herb Walk

Take an herb walk with Julia after a yoga session.

   Julia is a certified master herbalist and iridology practitioner. For many years she has given classes, presentations on the benefits of herbs, and private consultations.

   In her later years, Julia’s mother lived with them. Mom had lost her sight but her mind still created visions of what she wanted for Julia. They talked about building a cabin behind her house up on the hill. Every night when Julia came home from work, they would discuss the cabin. She told her how to decorate it and even what dishes to use. Mom was a huge part of the cabin.

   Mom told Julia, “You have to promise me you will build your cabin.”

Julia Cabin

Her cabin serves as the perfect place for a quiet retreat or an interesting workshop.

   Julia remembers, “She made my dream come true. The cabin was her vision for me.” Amish built this perfect place for an herbal experience in nature’s own setting. She takes pride in her cabin and conducts workshops there to tell others about the benefits of using herbs for culinary as well as medicinal purposes. Take a beautiful drive through Amish country to rural Fresno to find her business called A Simpler Thyme.

Julia Herb Garden

Her house and cabin are surrounded by herb gardens.

   “God put herbs on this earth for our benefit,” so Julia wants to make people passionate about using herbs and doing things naturally. Everything our body needs is right in front of us, such as herbs, fruits, vegetables, nuts, seeds, grains, trees, water, fresh air, and sunshine.

Julia Sprouting Lentils

Julia always has a jar of sprouting lentils around for a healthy snack.

   We just need to learn how to use them better for ourselves and our families. Using healthy herbs in the food we prepare is an easy way of sneaking medicine to our family.

   She became even more passionate after her back injury in 2012. She fell down the steps and fractured her L5. Doctors wanted to do surgery, but Julia changed her diet and exercised, using food and herbs as her medicine. No surgery was required and her back is fine today.

   Her recent interest is iridology, the study of the human eye. While she cannot diagnose ailments, she can see strengths and weaknesses by looking at the iris of a person’s eye. Your iris serves as a map to your body. The left eye shows the medical history of the mother while the right eye tells that of the father.

Julia Mom's Bedroom with eyes

Julia received the answer as to whether she should study iridology from the quilt in her mom’s bedroom.

   At first, Julia wasn’t certain if she wanted to pursue studying all the needed information. She was looking for a sign to tell her what she should do. She sat down in a rocking chair in her mother’s bedroom and looked at the pattern on the back of the quilt. It looked like there were eyes all over it. At that moment, she felt sure she needed to pursue iridology. The eye is a lamp unto the body and a window to the soul.

Julia Entrance

An old-fashioned outhouse fits the scene perfectly.

   The entire family has helped with the project. Husband Brian and children Autumn and Austin have been instrumental in giving her ideas for giveaways and herbal samples. Workshops will be held a couple of times a month and the schedule can be found on her website www.asimplerthyme.com

Julia Fire Cider

Julia demonstrates making a jar of Fire Cider at a recent workshop.

   Attended an interesting workshop in Newcomerstown with the Friends at the Table, a cookbook club, which meets once a month. The workshop revolved around making Fire Cider, a sure-fire natural remedy for colds. A shot of Fire Cider every twelve hours often gives quick relief.

   Julia’s main goal is educating the public on the many uses of herbs. She stresses, “If you don’t know what the herb or root is, don’t put it in your mouth.”

Julia inside cabin 2

Inside her cabin is a comfortable and quiet place for a workshop.

   Plan to attend one of Julia’s workshops or meet with her for a personal consultation at her comfy cabin. “God provides everything for us and it is up to us to know what to do with it.”

   Herbal Blessings are sent by Julia Brown from A Simpler Thyme.

Creative Touch to Cambridge Glass Makes Treasures That Have Historic Value

Cambridge Ornaments - Fireplace MantleIf you break or chip a piece of your precious Cambridge Glass, don’t throw it away. There still might be a use for it.

   Cambridge Glass Company made beautiful pieces of glassware from 1902 -1958 that are still cherished today. Once in a while a piece gets scratched or even cracked, but those who love Cambridge Glass don’t want to throw it away.

Cambridge Chipped

A shelf filled with damaged Cambridge Glass waits to be transformed into ornaments.

   That’s when sisters Cindy Arent and Lindy Thatcher decided they would use these imperfect pieces to make Christmas ornaments. This year they made 170 ornaments and see them selling quickly at the National Museum of Cambridge Glass.

   All of the decorations they make are from imperfect donated glass. Some may be broken dramatically, while others may just have a chip or small crack. No perfect pieces are ever used to create an ornament.

Cambridge severely broken

The stem on a severely broken piece will someday hang on someone’s Christmas display.

   When a goblet is donated, Lindy cuts off the bowl and then cuts off the stem. Two ornaments can be made from one piece of damaged glass. The base of the goblet is not used for decorations.

Cambridge Lindy smooths

Lindy grinds the cut section smooth while wearing protective covering.

   She has a power saw that cuts the glass smoothly, but she still has to grind it to make the end perfectly smooth. Lindy is very cautious as knows that glass particles often fly through the air. She wears a respirator and protective glasses when grinding.

DSC04231

The top part of a goblet becomes a beautifully etched Christmas ornament.

   After grinding the edges, a bell cap is formed over the end from which it will be hung. An epoxy glue holds the bell cap in place after a few minutes of pressure before letting it set for 48 hours. Then a ring is attached for easy hanging.

Cambridge Cindy decorate

Cindy decorates the ornaments with ribbon and Christmas cheer.

   Every year in the springtime when National Cambridge Collectors Convention meets, Lindy and Cindy often get a new selection of items donated to them for use as ornaments. These ladies donate their time and materials, and all money from the sale of the ornaments is given to the National Museum of Cambridge Glass in Cambridge, Ohio.

Cambridge Sisters

Sisters Cindy and Lindy give all proceeds to the Cambridge Glass Museum.

   A favorite ornament is an etched goblet hung upside down so it resembles a bell. Add a beautiful gold or red bow and it’s the perfect highlight for your Christmas tree.

Cambridge OSU Buckeye and Rosepoint

This OSU Buckeye / Rose Point ornament is an eye-catcher.

   Requests are frequently given for ornaments of a particular pattern or color. A favorite of many is that ever-popular Rose Point. They are shipped all over the United States to people who had family working at Cambridge Glass. A perfect gift!

Cambridge and Cameron (2)

Cameron Fontana from Good Day Columbus chose a Christmas ornament for his wife.

   While Carl Beynon and Cindy began making jewelry in the form of necklaces and earrings from the broken glass many years ago, today those items are being created by Susan Elliott, an NCC member who now lives in New Concord. Her jewelry items can also be purchased in the gift shop at the museum.

Cambridge stem pictures

The wall behind Cindy’s work area shows different stem styles.

   Cindy and Lindy have a long family history of Cambridge Glass. Their aunt, Mary Martha Mitchell worked at the Cambridge Glass Company for most of her life so the girls heard about it all through their youth. Today both ladies are on the Board of Directors for the National Museum of Cambridge Glass. Cindy is the museum director while Lindy is the treasurer.

Cambridge Wildflower ornament

A Cambridge Wildflower ornament is trimmed in gold.

   While Cindy had heard about Cambridge Glass all her life, her interest was piqued when her husband, Mike, bought her a Cambridge Glass Moonlight bowl as a Christmas present. Her interest shortly thereafter became more serious.

   Lindy often went with her Aunt Mary to glass shows all over the country. She couldn’t help but catch the fever traveling with someone who for over thirty years had served as secretary to Presidents of the Cambridge Glass, A.J. Bennett and W.L. Orme.

Creative Team

These busy ladies at the museum, Cindy, Sharon, and Lindy, also co-chair the Dickens Creative Team.

   Not only do these ladies volunteer their time to the Glass Museum, Lindy, Cindy and Sharon Bachna are also co-chairs of the Creative Team, which designs the Victorian scenes for Dickens Victorian Village. Cambridge is fortunate to have such dedication. They are busy and creative volunteers!

Cambridge Ornament Display

Ornaments can be purchased from the museum display.

   Cambridge Glass is still treasured in many ways today. You can find these spectacular sparkling ornaments in the gift shop at the National Museum of Cambridge Glass on 9th Street in Cambridge, Ohio. Their Holiday Hours from November 1 – December 21 are Friday and Saturday from noon – 4:00. 

   Cambridge Glass ornaments will add a special touch to your tree or home. For many, they will bring back memories of family members who worked at the factory. Stop by and visit their outstanding displays. It’s a great place to find a special sparkling Christmas gift or perhaps a treasure for yourself.

National Museum of Cambridge Glass is located at 136 South 9th Street in Cambridge, Ohio just a half block off Wheeling Avenue. Cambridge is located at the crossroads of I-70 and I-77 for easy access.

Ventriloquist Dean Bohl and Chester Encourage Audiences by Spreading Happiness

Chester and Dean

Dean and Chester teach life lessons in their school presentations.

Things are not always as they appear.

Crowds gathered around when Dean Bohl came to Dickens Victorian Village with his Twisted Balloons and Chester. The young and young at heart enjoy his charades with Chester, while children can be seen running proudly down the street holding one of his balloon sculptures.

Opening Night Balloons baby

This youngster enjoyed her balloon doll at Dickens Victorian Village’s Opening Night.

   Dean has been entertaining since he was in his late thirties when he decided to use ventriloquism, balloons, and magic to motive and encourage his audience. He twists his balloons into intriguing characters that the children enjoy.

   Chester Sidney Dolittle is this ventriloquist’s best friend on stage. His sidekick Chester, an eight-year-old, becomes so real that people forget he is a puppet. He tells the audience, “Girls are beautiful. Boys have stinky feet.”

Opening Ventriloquist

A crowd gathered as he selected a Living Puppet to add some fun.

   An unusual section of his performance involves an unsuspecting audience member, who becomes his “Living Puppet.” A mask is placed on the person’s face and he becomes the voice from Dean Bohl. Fun and excitement happen next as they sing, tell jokes, recite poetry, and become involved in interesting conversations.

  As a youngster, Dean’s mother developed polio and was told her condition would require institutionalization. But during her hospital stay, she had a dream where Jesus visited her and when she woke up, she told them, “Jesus is going to make me better.” Three weeks later she walked out of the hospital.

   This miracle changed the course of their family’s life and Dean at the age of 16 felt a call to follow the path his parents had taken. On his mind previously, this White Sox fan wanted to follow a career in professional baseball. Now, he decided, “God, give me peace and joy of living. I’ll do what you want me to do.”

Dean at birtrhday party with unicorn (2)

Balloon unicorns were popular at a recent birthday party.

   For several years, Dean was a pastor in Illinois and then decided to be an associate pastor was more to his calling where he worked with children and choir. He received encouragement from those around him and moved his family to a church in San Diego, CA where puppets entered the scene as a way to reach children.

   It seemed he was always in the right place at the right time as people just appeared when he needed to learn something new. Chester was made especially for Dean by a popular San Diego Ventriloquist Co. and became part of his life in October 1978.

Dean and Chester (3)

Dean and Chester entertain the crowds wherever they appear.

   The puppet’s name came from three sources. “Chester” was the name given by the company while “Sidney “ was the name of the pastor, who believed in Dean when he started his puppet ministry. “Dolittle” of course, came easily as Chester doesn’t do much! Dean then developed Chester’s voice and personality before their first show together on Christmas Eve.

   Since then, Dean and Chester have developed a special connection. Things come from Chester that they had never intended to say. Sometimes the conversation between the two of them is so fast that it sounds like both are talking at the same time.

Dean and Judy

Dean and his wife Judy encourage others wherever they go.

   Dean and his wife had two small children at this time so carefully discussed their new idea of traveling the United States with a puppet show. His understanding wife told him, “If we don’t do this, we will always wonder if it would have worked.” The traveled the road for a few years before settling in Dublin, Ohio.

   Along the way, he met someone in a store who asked him what he gave away at his shows. They suggested he make balloon creatures and it just happened that a balloon artist walked into the store. The right people always seemed to show up as part of God’s plan for his life.

Dean Flower Bouquet

A balloon bouquet makes a perfect and memorable gift.

   Twisted balloons are a special feature of his program and he has developed a unique way of combining three to five balloons to make Star Wars lightsabers, princess lighted rings, teddy bears, OSU football helmets and the list goes on. Ideas are shared with balloon artists all over the world.

Dean and Live Puppet

You never know what Dean has planned for the Live Puppet.

   He stumbled upon his idea for the “Living Puppet” from a show he witnessed in England and New Zealand. This is a more recent addition to his program. A man in the Phillippines makes his masks for him so Dean can control them from behind – just like a regular puppet. He is blessed with wonderful connections.

   His school programs not only entertain but also teach a lesson. In one skit, Chester calls people names and makes fun of them, but then Dean calls Chester a “Dummy” and Chester gets so upset he hides in his box and won’t come out. Calling names may seem funny but someone always gets hurt in the process. “Once you get a reputation, it is hard to shake it.”

    Or Chester might find a beautiful balloon apple on the ground. When he picks it up, a balloon worm pops out. “Things can be beautiful on the outside and not so perfect on the inside.”

Dean at travel show (2)

His balloons were an added attraction at a recent travel show at the Columbus Convention Center.

   Now Dean is retired, but he still looks forward to being with people and having fun. Life lessons seem to pop into his shows naturally. You might find him entertaining at fairs, birthday parties, school assemblies, camps, corporate events, and more.

   Watch for Dean Bohl and Chester in your neighborhood as they spread a little happiness to those that stop by. You might even get into the act!

Contact Dean to set up a performance by calling his cell phone at 614-314-0696 or email him at puppetman3@yahoo.com. Dean has moved so the address on the card is no longer correct.

Dean Calling Card

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