Places to go and things to see by Gypsy Bev

Archive for the ‘Ohio’ Category

Romance Blossoms at Dickens Victorian Village

A loving heart is the truest wisdom.

~Charles Dickens

There was a special connection the first time they met.

The spirit of Christmas at Dickens Victorian Village leads to many interesting adventures. One of those involves a couple who just happened to meet at Sheetz in New Philadelphia when Shannon was having car trouble and Curtis appeared to help. They sensed a connection that first evening.

After that, they talked on the phone several times and agreed to meet again at Sheetz before going to dinner in New Philadelphia on November 22, 2014. Curtis discovered through the phone calls that Shannon had a real passion for Christmas. After dinner at Pro’s Table, he suggested they go to Dickens Victorian Village in Cambridge.

Shannon had never been there before but loved Dickens Victorian Village at first sight. They walked from 6th Street to 11th Street and enjoyed all the Victorian scenes. They laughed, talked, and had a great time.

Shannon decorates her tree with her longtime collection of Hallmark ornaments.

Shannon loves the Christmas season because it’s a time when everyone is happy and thoughtful. Families gather around the Christmas tree to exchange gifts and share their love. To her, the season is filled with happiness.

In December, even though Curtis has a passion for heavy metal music, he arranged to take Shannon to hear the Trans-Siberian Orchestra in Pittsburgh. While there, he took her a ride on the Incline in a car reserved just for them. On the way down, he presented her with a promise ring – with a promise that he would never hurt her. Charles Dickens expressed that same vow for all of us when he wrote, “Have a heart that never hardens, and a temper that never tires, and a touch that never hurts.”

Shannon was walked down the aisle by her brother with the Dickens characters in the background.

A year later, on November 22, 2015, Curtis and Shannon were married at the Courthouse during the Dickens Victorian Village season. They loved the Christmas spirit that they felt there. It started out a fairly warm day; however, just during the wedding ceremony, snow fell creating a magical snowball effect.

Curtis and Shannon were married at the Guernsey County Courthouse with snow falling just for their ceremony.

Shannon told Curtis he could wear whatever he wanted to the wedding as she knew he didn’t like dressing up in a suit. Curtis chose his leather Harley jacket, hat, and boots. Then Shannon decided to wear Harley boots under her traditional wedding gown. They wrote their own special vows. Their reception was held at the Senecaville Fire Department, where Curtis is a volunteer. Then they headed to Carlisle Inn for their honeymoon. Their fun never stops!

Christmas with her Christmas tree is a special time of the year for Shannon.

Their Christmas Trees are a source of real pleasure. Shannon collects Hallmark ornaments for one of their trees while Curtis has a Harley Christmas tree. Christmas is an important celebration at the Broners’ home.

Being bikers is an important part of their lives and they enjoy having their hot dog stand at biker events.

Curtis is a gas and welding specialist at Matheson..the gas professionals in Senecaville, while Shannon works as a medical secretary at Akron Children’s Hospital. Even though both of them have full-time jobs, Curtis always had a dream of having a hot dog cart. As a youngster of seven years old, he went to work with his dad who was a policeman. Outside the office, there was a hot dog cart where Curtis enjoyed getting his lunch and began dreaming.

In 2016, they went to Connecticut where a church had advertised a brand new cart for sale. The church didn’t realize all the work involved and was willing to sell it for a fair price. One of the first places they used that cart was at Seneca Lake when they were rebuilding the concession stand. That summer, the hot dog cart was at the lake every weekend.

The hot dog stand keeps them busy on weekends.

The only time they have ever sold on a street corner was for Dickens Victorian Village. They set up on the US Bank steps right beside the courthouse, their magical place. Broner hot dogs are all beef and none of their additions are from a can. Would you believe that a macaroni and cheese dog with bacon is their most popular seller? Other popular ones are their Carolina slaw dog and of course, a chili dog.

Their logo incorporates the fact that Curt is a volunteer at the fire department.

They don’t skimp on anything so you get a meal in a bun. Usually, their hot dog cart can now be found at festivals and Harley events. The Hot Dog Cart logo incorporates the firefighter with the traditional dalmatian dog and the helmet shows Curtis’ volunteer #23. Their slogan, “Putting out the fire in your belly,” goes with that firefighter logo. Slogan, logo, and name are all registered and can not be duplicated…much like the great taste of their hot dogs!

Riding Curt’s Harley is one of their favorite pastimes.

When asked what they might enjoy doing in the future, Shannon would like to go on a cruise to someplace warm. Curtis wants to ride his Harley across country on Route 66. Life for them will always be an adventure.

In the meantime, they enjoy returning to Dickens Victorian Village every November 22 to relive their first date with a walk downtown and a chance to see the beautiful Holiday Light Show. Dickens will always hold a special place in their hearts. Perhaps it will find a special spot in your heart too.

Happy, happy Christmas, that can win us back to the delusions of our childhood days, recall to the old man the pleasure of his youth, and transport the traveler back to his own fireside and quiet home!

~Charles Dickens

Pennington’s Brings National Entertainment to Jewett, Ohio

Their dining area seats 170 and is packed on concert nights.

If you build it, they will come” from the movie Field of Dreams became the mantra that created Pennington’s in Jewett. It all began in 2015 when Nashville music veteran Shawn Pennington and his long-time friend, Pete Koch from Scio helped organize a concert in Deersville for their 200th birthday.

A feature of that concert was a group called Trick Pony, who performed on a stage built outside the Deersville General Store. More than 2,000 people filled the street to watch that performance. It seemed to Shawn and Pete that the Ohio Valley was hungry for good country music…and the idea for Pennington’s began.

Shawn, grandfather Hobe, and manager Pete were instrumental in getting Pennington’s started.

Shawn has a longtime connection to the Jewett-Scio area. While his family lived in Pittsburgh, as a child Shawn spent nearly every weekend and summer vacation with his grandparents, Hobart and Mary Stroud in Scio. So, it was natural for Shawn to feel that Scio was the place he called Home.

In the early 90s, Shawn traveled the world as a professional musician before moving to Nashville to become tour manager for the up-and-coming Sara Evans. He worked hard on promoting her career where she sold more than 2 million records and toured with greats like Kenny Chesney, George Strait, Alan Jackson, and Reba McIntire.

Shawn Pennington enjoys trying new things – like Pennington’s Restaurant in Jewett.

Because of his success and the relationships he had built, a powerhouse management firm of Dale Morris & Associates asked him to join them. It was an opportunity he couldn’t pass up. Shawn’s talents as musician/producer, tour and production manager, and eventually artist manager led him to play important roles in the careers of Big & Rich, John Rich, Gretchen Wilson, Cowboy Troy, and Randy Owen just to name a few.

So, when he got the idea for a country music restaurant in the Jewett-Scio area, he thought it would be a chance to bring some of those country music artists, as well as rock and comedy, that he knew to perform there. He felt people were eager for good music in that part of the country.

Pennington’s is located in the 110-year-old Kammeyer Opera House in Jewett.

Shortly after he began thinking about the restaurant, his granddad, Hobe, called to tell him that granddad’s favorite place to eat was going up for sale in Jewett. Jo-Lin’s Restaurant was located in the old Kammeyer Opera House, a 110-year-old building with a lot of class and character.

Their patriotic spirit includes a large wall hanging of the Pledge of Allegiance made by local Lewton Metalworks.

Again, he called upon his old friend, Pete Koch to manage the restaurant as Shawn had no previous experience managing a restaurant. But it was a change that he thought would be fun and of benefit to the community.

Their well-lighted stage is set up for a Night Train performance.

Over the next few years, they redecorated the building, added a fantastic stage area with cool lighting, improved their product, and found a group of people that could carry out running the restaurant easily.

Now, the restaurant seats 170 people for dinner and a show. It’s a place where you can get up close and personal with the performers. If you’re down front, you may only be a few feet away. Even in the back, you’re only about fifty feet away. Not many places you can have this kind of experience.

Pennington’s manager, Pete Koch, presents Sarah Snyder with a check for the Harrison Co. Military Support Group.

Food is delicious as well. They have daily specials that give great variety to their basic menu. It includes wings, cod nuggets, appetizers, salads, sandwiches, soups, and pizza. They have a wide variety of beverages including soft drinks, beers, and wines. Children have their own special menu.

People get to sit up close and personal with the performers.

Every weekend since July 2021, they have had award-winning talent on stage. Past performers include Frankie Ballard, Little Texas, Pam Tillis, Neal McCoy, Deana Carter, Thompson Square, and Confederate Railroad just to name a few. There are special groups every month so check out their website to see who is performing. Get your tickets online by going to www.penningtonsjewett.com.

In 2016, Shawn opened Pennington Entertainment, a full-service artist development and management company. He started this Nashville enterprise with over twenty years of management for other companies under his belt. While music is his main focus, Shawn also has produced television programming for major networks.

Being a pilot has become Shawn’s relaxation therapy.

Shawn still lives in Nashville but makes frequent weekend trips to Jewett. He’s trying something else new these days…he’s upgrading his pilot’s license. His passion for flying, which began as a ten-year-old, became strong again just a few years ago when Allen Jackson, the personal pilot for Kenny Chesney, invited him to the airport to hang out. There happened to be a flight school right next to Chesney’s hangar where the owner took Shawn up in a little Cessna for an hour flight.

When he returned from that flight, he had ten new voicemails and 48 new emails on his phone. He had completely forgotten about his Blackberry for an entire hour! Flying became therapy for him. The next month he took a Boeing 737 introductory course and has been obsessed with aviation ever since.

Their newest addition is a Block O Bar for Buckeye fans.

Life keeps Shawn very busy between his restaurant, aviation, and artist management. Because of his Nashville experience, he wants Pennington’s to provide an experience to the client from the minute they enter the parking lot until they leave the performance. Shawn remarked, “I want Jewett to be a destination town.”

Gnadenhutten Ohio Celebrates 250 Years

Ohio’s Oldest Existing Settlement

A local lady designed this wooden flag to celebrate their 250th Anniversary.

Gnadenhutten is the oldest settlement in the state of Ohio and this year celebrates its 250th birthday. In 1772, Rev. David Zeisberger, a Moravian missionary, and another young missionary, John Heckewelder, founded two villages along the Tuscarawas River in the state of Ohio with the help of Joshua, a Mohican chieftain.

Most are familiar with Schoenbrunn Village, which was Zeisberger’s first settlement for the American Indians – mostly Delawares. His second settlement that same year was Gnadenhutten and that town still exists today.

Children have many games to enjoy at the festival.

This October, Gnadenhutten will celebrate its 250th anniversary at their Homecoming Celebration on the 7, 8, and 9th. It all begins on Friday evening with food trucks downtown and apple butter being made at the museum. Saturday has activities planned all day long for all members of the family. Sunday, church services will be held in the Museum House in the Historical Park.

The stage is set for a musical Saturday afternoon and evening.

Streets downtown are blocked off for craft booths, Farmers’ Market, Corn-Hole Tournament, and music. While the kids are enjoying the Bounce House, Obstacle Course, Putt Putt, and Face Painting, adults might relax playing Bingo at the Fire House. Don’t forget to check out Custom Kemps Car Show in the afternoon.

Putnams System Rewind will provide music on Saturday evening.

Saturday will be filled with music. In the afternoon Wes Schryok and Mike Wykoff will be entertaining. Then that evening, Putnams System Rewind, a family band with a reputation for performing a great variety of music, will be on stage from 6 -9. Music will be followed by fireworks from the top of Stocker’s Hill.

An encampment in early 1800s style will greet visitors to the Historical Park.

Apple Butter Days happens on October 8 and 9 at the museum with apple peeling beginning on Friday night when they will show people how to make apple butter. The family of Samuel Shrock from Millersburg will be making the apple butter again this year. Enjoy visiting the encampment in the park where people will be dressed for the early 1800s.

A monument at the Historical Park remembers those who were slain.

A memorial was placed in the Historical Park at the spot of what is now called the Gnadenhutten Massacre. The plaque on the memorial states:

HERE

TRIUMPHED IN DEATH

NINETY

CHRISTIAN INDIANS

MARCH 8, 1782

Ten years after settlement, Captain David Williamson, an American Revolutionary War officer, and his militia suspected the peaceful Mohicans and Delawares in Gnadenhutten, who had been converted by the Moravian missionaries because they remained neutral during the war. Seeking revenge for other Indian raids, they tricked the Delaware into believing they were friends. The next day, March 8, 1782, they killed all the villagers except for two scalped boys who escaped and told of the incident. One Ohio historian called it “the wickedest deed in our history.” Story of this tragedy is told at the outdoor drama, Trumpet in the Land.

The museum contains a history of Gnadenhutten from its beginning.

A museum tells the story of those early settlers, who lived a peaceful life in their log cabins along the river. These Indians loved music and enjoyed working in their gardens. There is also a reconstructed church and log cabin like those that were on that site over 200 years ago. A burial mound contains the remains of those ninety Christian Delawares who were massacred that day.

John Heil, curator, visits at the museum with his two best friends, who never argue with him.

The mayor’s office and the museum have a small booklet “Massacre at Gnadenhutten” which is a copy of the history published by the Gnadenhutten Monument and Cemetery Organization back on October 7, 1843. It tells the entire story of what is called the blackest page in history of the Northwest Territory.

A special display tells the history of John Heckewelder, the founder of the village.

After the massacre, John Heckewelder returned to the village and again organized the town but this time with basically a white Moravian population. Today there is still a Moravian Church in Gnadenhutten called the John Heckewelder Memorial Moravian Church established in 1803. Due to his early persistence in establishing the village, Gnadenhutten still exists today.

The Moravian tradition lives on as John Heckewelder Memorial Moravian Church has been in the same spot for 220 years.

Mayor Rich Gosling hopes that in the future, “While we will never forget the tragic massacre that took place here, I would like for Gnadenhutten to, first of all, be remembered as the oldest settlement in Ohio.”

The Tuscarawas River flows at the edge of Gnadenhutten.

The town has grown from those early days when travel was on trails by horseback and wagon or on the Tuscarawas River. Things changed in the early 1900s when the Ohio-Erie Canal traveled along the river, followed by the railroad and then today’s highways.

Enjoy a visit to Gnadenhutten, the oldest established town in Ohio, during their 250th Anniversary celebration. Then watch what changes happen over the next 50 years.

Take a Relaxing Visit to Historic Harmar Village

Old Fort Harmar was built near the confluence of the Ohio and Muskingum Rivers.

At the confluence of the Muskingum and Ohio Rivers, Fort Harmar was the first military fort built in Ohio County. Built under the command of General Josiah Harmar, this 1785 fort was given his name.

This drawing was made by early pioneer, Judge Joseph Gilman.

Its purpose was to keep illegal settlers from squatting there but it proved the opposite as they came and settled because they felt safe from the American Indians with the protection of the fort. The fort was abandoned in 1790 and demolished in 1791. Its location is thought to be under the Ohio River as the river has widened over the years.

Take a trolley ride for interesting historical stories.

The Ohio Company planned out Harmar Village near the fort site across the Muskingum River from downtown Marietta. Today, a trolley tour of Historic Marietta and Harmar is a nice way to get an overview. Then you can go back and see the places that appeal to you. Once you get to the other side of the river, Harmar Village is filled with historical homes, a few unique shops, many dining experiences, museums, and restored train cars.

Historic Harmar Bridge provided a nice walk over the Muskingum River in past years.

Historic Harmar Railroad Bridge, strictly pedestrian in recent years, leads from Front Street in downtown Marietta to Harmar Village but is now closed. It was a scenic walk over the Muskingum River to explore the old restored village. The bridge, which was built in the 1860s is in disrepair and they have a campaign to save the bridge as it was the only working, hand-operated railroad bridge in America. They still operate it during the Harmar Festival for those who would like a ride. All proceeds, of course, go to Save the Bridge.

Putnam House is high on the hill overlooking the town and the rivers.

A beautiful Italianate home can be found high on the hill in Harmar. It was built in 1859 by Douglas Putnam, one of Marietta’s wealthiest men. Putnam was the leader of the abolitionists in the area where he was a major supporter of the Underground Railroad.

He built the home for his wife Eliza who fell in love with that style when traveling through New England. Eliza carefully chose everything that was to go into the house to make it their home. The cost at that time was $60,000.

The family named the house Putnam Place, although many called it Putnam’s Folly. The tower was probably his idea as he could easily see both rivers and the city as well as across the river to Virginia so he could keep a good eye on slave movement. At that time the Ohio River was rather shallow and you could easily ride a horse across it. Later the house was purchased by Harry Knox, a builder of steamboats, and renamed Anchorage.

In recent years, paranormal investigations and tours have also been held at Putnam Villa by the Washington County Historical Society, which hopes to restore it.

Henry Fearing House Museum gives a glimpse of life in the early 1800s.

Harmar seems to overflow with historical homes. The Henry Fearing House Museum gives you a taste of middle-class life during the Victorian era. Fearing invested in the area and had a steamboat enterprise. Built in 1847, today this house holds historical items from Marietta and Washington counties. In 1829, Levi Barber, who was a surveyor and U.S. Congressman, built The Barber House.

The Children’s Toy & Doll Museum has a vast collection of old toys.

The Children’s Toy & Doll Museum gives visitors a glimpse of what toys entertained children during the late 19th and early 20th centuries. The house where this hidden treasure is located was built in 1889 by George Strecker, a local boilermaker. They have beautiful displays of dollhouses, circus wagons, dolls from around the world, and many new displays this year.

The Old Post Office has a train display beside it.

The Old Post Office is a center of attraction right beside their train display. Lydia Young served as postmaster here from 1864-1885 in what was also her notary shop. While there aren’t many places for shopping in Harmar, you’ll find several places for delicious food as all have crowds of people at lunchtime.

Busy Bee is a popular family restaurant for breakfast and lunch.

Busy Bee is right next door to the Post Office and has been serving fresh ingredients from local farms since 1944. Everything is made from scratch with breakfast their specialty. Larry loves the area and has plans for starting three new businesses there: a bakery, butcher shop, and distillery.

Harmar Tavern has a friendly bar, indoor dining, and a great patio.

Stop for a meal at Spagna’s Italian Restaurant right next door to Harmar Tavern. Spagna’s offers authentic southern Italian cuisine and an extensive wine list. Or go next door to the tavern, a neighborhood gathering place that almost never closes. They are known for their “Soon to be famous” Fried Bologna Sandwich.

The history of Harmar is told at the edge of town near where the original fort stood.

If you are planning to attend their Fourth of July Celebration or the Sternwheeler Festival, you might enjoy heading to Lookout Point on Harmar Hill. Here you can see many vistas of Marietta as well as the beautiful Ohio and Muskingum Rivers winding their way through the scene. It’s a great place to watch the fireworks! Harmar is a great place to visit any time of the year.

Jake Graham’s Writing Journey

If you don’t have a dream, how you gonna’ make a dream come true.

Jake Graham writes under the author name of Jacob Paul Patchen.

Since the age of twelve, Jake Graham has been writing poetry. His first poem emerged during a disturbing time in his life and was on the stormy side. Then he fell in love with poetry.

As a student at Meadowbrook High School, he also wanted to play football. So poetry was set aside as his main passion for a while. However, he never stopped writing poems in his notebooks as it helped him to understand the world around him.

After high school, Jake served with the Marines in Iraq.

Jake is a veteran of the Marines where he served in the infantry in Iraq. His reason for serving was to protect our freedoms, which are very important to him. He appreciates all who have served.

“Of Love and War” is a collection of poems associated with the author’s service in Iraq.
Upon his return from service, he worked with Graham Excavating for a short time.

He went to Muskingum University to follow his football passion but while there his professors gave him encouragement and guidance in his writing. Today Jake is a learning consultant at Muskingum University where he tutors students with learning disabilities in their PLUS program. His youthful spirit helps students feel they can accomplish their goals.

A big influence in his life was Grandpa Charles “Whitey” Patchen.

Most of his poetry is written about him and his life…and for him. It’s very therapeutic to write about feelings. Growing up, Jake was very close to his grandfather so some of his poetry such as the book “Plucking Chickens from the Pines with Grandpa” developed from experiences with him.

Jake felt that the lessons he learned from his grandpa were more important than anything he learned in school…if he had paid attention! Actually, Jake wanted to keep his grandfather’s Patchen name alive since he had no sons and uses Jacob Paul Patchen as his author name.

Jake surprised his mom with a Welcome sign for Christmas with some of his shotgun shells attached.

His novels are fiction and based on ideas that float through his mind. “When something hits you, you have to act on it,” Jake explained. When he writes, he pictures it in his head as playing out as a movie. His stories center around love, family, war, and learning things the hard way. These are the things that made him the man he is today so he feels it important to spread that message.

Jake read some of his poetry at a meeting of Cambridge Writers at Crossroads Library.

Due to his Marine service, his books that are related to the war are based on real experiences he has felt himself or witnessed. He seriously cares about the number of suicides that are committed each day by veterans who have problems living with the world they have seen. Of Love and War is based on his war experiences through poetry and prose.

Words That Matter – Family begins a children’s series of picture books that help them focus on what is important in life. His plans are for a ten-book series for children to help them with issues in many parts of their lives.

The Silver Medal was presented to him by the Military Writers Society of America.

Telling it like it is has become his style. He doesn’t hold back on telling things that really do happen even if he is writing them in a fiction format. His style is easy to read and has already won six book awards. He writes stories for children, teens, young adults. and adults. Every book has a purpose with a touch of Jake’s great sense of humor.

Recently he had a signing at Bookology in Cambridge.

Recently, author Jacob Paul Patchen has had the opportunity for speaking engagements as well as book signings. He enjoys talking to other writers and constantly looks for ways to improve his own writings.

He frequently speaks to groups about his writing and experiences.

It was a special privilege to come back to Meadowbrook High School and speak to students on Career Day, as well as to classes at Muskingum University. Perhaps along the way, he can help someone have a better understanding of a personal problem through his writings.

Here are his earliest books and he keeps adding to that list all the time.

A couple of these books have become required reading for counselor training classes as they explain the turmoil that accompanies problems faced in today’s world. His words paint a clear picture of what victims endure. For those suffering past or present from abuse or severe trauma, these books touch the soul.

His most recent book, “No Pistol Tastes the Same” a PRSD Novel, gives a clear picture of what the war zone was like and the problems many military men and women have when returning to civilian life. Jake’s choice of words and comparisons make reading easy, yet you can feel their pain.

This author wants to impact others with his writing so much that they try to change for the better. Finding happiness in the form of love, freedom, and purpose would be his goal. Someday he’d like to own some land, a house, an RV…and maybe even an island!

Jacob Patchen encourages others by telling them,

“Go do more than just exist. Go be.

Go inspire and achieve.

Go do the things that make you breathe.

Find a way to make us better.”

That would be a great lesson for all of us to follow. Find the things in life that bring you enjoyment, then focus on those things.

For questions or scheduling a talk, contact the author at Jacobpaulpatchen@yahoo.com.

Early Cambridge City Park History FIlled with Wonderful Memories

Families throughout the area have pleasant memories of times spent at Cambridge City Park. Some have been here from childhood to adulthood and have seen many of the changes in recent years but those early years remain only a memory.

Col. Taylor’s mansion built in 1878 is today a popular Bed & Breakfast.

The area that we call Cambridge City Park today was once part of Col. Taylor’s thousand-acre estate. The home we know today as Taylor Bed & Breakfast was actually the first house to be built on the hill outside of town.

Not only did he build a beautiful home for his wife, but he had a nearby barn where he kept his horses, the only means of transportation at that time. Since the horses needed water, Col. Taylor built Taylor Lake. When the pond froze over in the winter, blocks of ice were cut from it and stored in an underground cellar. Usually, they had ice until sometime in July before it all melted.

The City Pond, where children love to feed the ducks, was the first part of the park.

Taylor Lake today is the duck pond at our Cambridge City Park. In January 1913, Taylor Grove and the lake were sold to the city by Col. Taylor’s heirs for $25,000. Our Cambridge City Park was about to begin.

In July, a Clean-up Day was organized. All men interested in the City Park were to line up at the Courthouse and march to the City Park being led there by the Cambridge Band. A Colored Band was also there to liven the day. Ladies provided a picnic supper in the evening.

Electric Park hosted a Chautauqua celebration and many other activities before Cambridge City Park existed.

The Cambridge City Band began playing at the park in July 1913 when they sponsored the Lincoln Chautauqua, which had previously taken place at Electric Park. The price of a season ticket to enter the performing tent for the six-day event was $1.50 for adults and $1.00 for children 8 -15. There were a number of seats, swings, and tents provided for the patrons. Anyone wishing to do so could pitch their tent there that week.

In July, a lifeguard was appointed to oversee the swimming in the former Taylor Lake with rules laid down for the conduct of boys and girls to be enforced. If the girls were highly interested in swimming there, arrangements would be made to set aside a particular time for them to swim as well as have a woman oversee during that time and give lessons in swimming. A bathhouse has been promised by city council in the near future.

Baseball was played in the park in the summer of 1913.

At about the same time, the first baseball diamond was constructed which brought local teams and their families to the City Park. Money was raised by a group of interested citizens for a stadium called Lakeview Park that seated approximately 1000 people. Many baseball and softball games were played here each summer. It also was the perfect place for the annual Jaycee’s Fireworks on July 4.

By July of that year, families and organizations were already having their picnics there. Some of the first groups were the Mail Carriers Association of Southeastern Ohio and the Welsh-American Society, both of these on Labor Day.

A bathhouse along the pond, where swimming was popular, was an early addition.

Gravel walks were installed, rope swings, a bathhouse on the side of the lake, high and low diving boards, and the lake was enlarged. They wanted it to be the most beautiful recreation ground in Southeastern Ohio.

One of the early buildings to be constructed was the Big Pavilion, which served as a dance floor, concert hall, and speaker’s stand. Often there were six or seven reunions held there in one day.

The Kiddie’s Pool was a popular and safe place to swim.

In 1930, the local president of Cambridge Glass Co., A.J. Bennett provided funds to build a Children’s Wading Pool at the park so they had a safe place to swim away from the pond. There were two sides to the pool – a shallow side for wading and a deeper side for swimming. Lifeguards did not like children going under the bridge to get to the deeper side. It was closed in 1973.

The slide at the big pool was a favorite for a cool ride.

In 1941, Cambridge City Pool was opened after being constructed through a federal grant by the WPA. In 1998, the pool had to be redone to meet current standards. Again, the community supported the project wholeheartedly.

The park pavilion had a Coca Cola concession stand in 1965.

By this time there were several concession stands throughout the park – at the big pavilion, baseball diamond, and swimming pool. One person recalls having keys to all of them and if he happened to be at the park would open whichever one had a crowd. His first summer he made $.75 an hour.

Horseshoe contests were popular at picnics and reunions.

Pitching horseshoes was another important means of entertainment. There were several horseshoe pits at the park and many tournaments were held there usually accompanied by an ice cream social.

A man who lived close to town brought in his ponies for the children to ride.

Most children have dreams of riding a pony. Someone helped make that dream come alive by bringing several of his ponies to the park and charging a small fee for a ride. Speaking of horses, in those early years, you could hear the musical sound of a carousel at the park. No wonder the park was such a busy place..and still is today.

Kids of all ages enjoy a fast spin on the merry-go-round.
The Witch’s Hat was considered the most dangerous ride at the park.

Over the years, the playground has become an important part of the park. The largest section was begun soon after the park opened. A merry-go-round that parents felt was a terror device gave youngsters of all ages a chance to see how fast they could spin. The playground has been upgraded today through the generosity of the Kiwanis and Rotary Clubs.

The firetruck made a great place for climbing and using your imagination.

An old fire truck that out-lasted its usefulness at the city fire department was stripped of all removable parts and placed in the park in 1957 for children to climb on. Not often did children get a chance to play on a fire truck.

The Armstrong Bridge was originally over Salt Fork Creek before the development of Salt Fork Lake.

In 1966-67. the Armstrong Bridge was relocated to the City Park. This bridge, built in 1849, originally spanned Salt Fork Creek near the town of Clio. When Salt Fork Lake development was announced, the bridge was moved to preserve it.

This is just a little taste of the history of our Cambridge City Park. This community has been so supportive of the park since its beginning through individual and business financial support and volunteering. May they keep improving and supporting the park to make it even a better place for future generations.

History of Coal in Harrison County

The Coal Mining Museum is in the basement of the Puskarich Public Library.

A Coal Mining Museum has been created to preserve the rich mining heritage of Harrison County Ohio. It can be found on the lower level of the Puskarich Public Library at 200 E. Market St. in Cadiz. Displays are many and detailed with informative signs to describe both the early day and modern mining found in Southeastern Ohio.

After the Puskarich family helped with the half-million-dollar campaign to build the new library in 1986, there was a large area on the lower level that remained empty. Since their family owned and operated the successful Cravat Coal Company, the Puskarichs spearheaded the plan for a Coal Mining Museum. Their family, along with other area coal mining families, presented items for display.

Watch fobs were often gifts from mining companies for advertisement purposes.

During the late 19th century, Harrison County was one of the top coal-producing counties in Ohio until its decline in the 1980s. Items and pictures from those mines plus miners’ tools are on display from various coal companies.

Walking into the museum, you will notice that the walls and ceilings are black, giving you the feeling of being in a dark coal mine.

This Ohio map shows the locations of coal fields at a glance.

Coal is sometimes called “buried sunshine” because it came from plants that originally absorbed energy from the sun. When coal is burned, we are using energy that was created millions of years ago. Along with oil and natural gas, coal is considered a fossil fuel since it traces its beginning to plants that were once alive. Often prints of fossils can be found in a piece of coal.

Jewelry made from coal is showcased in their lobby.

The Coal Mining Museum is a great place to learn how coal is formed, the tools used to mine it, and the heavy equipment used in strip mining. Historic photographs line the walls giving you a better understanding of mining and the size of equipment used.

Universal Newsreel photographer captures the moment when Ida Mae is allowed back in the mine.

One of those photos shows Ida Mae Stull, the first woman coal miner, dressed for the mines. Ida was one of 18 children and carried a lantern to the mines for her father when she was six. Ida enjoyed digging coal and mined six or seven cars a day by the age of 30. Her pay for the day was $2 but that paid the mortgage on her property and kept her off charity. Legal action then made it illegal for women to work in the mines but in one year she won her case and was back doing what she loved – digging coal. Ida lived to the age of 84.

The Watts Coal Car made in Barnesville was donated by the Cravat Coal Company.

A featured display shows an actual Watts Car loaded with coal and equipment in front of a large photo of the entrance of a deep mine. Watts Cars were made in nearby Barnesville and this car was donated by the Cravat Coal Company.

Bird cages were an early safety feature in the mines. If a bird died, the men had to leave quickly.

Another interesting display shows safety measures in the mine. A birdcage is displayed which was the earliest way of telling if the mine was safe for miners. If the bird died, they knew the miners had to leave as quickly as possible to escape the deadly gas in the mine. Later methods show rescue kits provided for the miners with oxygen tanks that would last up to an hour that would last up to one hour.

Mines paid in scrip which could only be used at their company store.

Of special interest were the various scrips used as payment to the coal miners. In this way, they had to buy everything from the company store. These people really did “Owe their soul to the company store.”

The miner’s dinner pail hung from a nail in the mine to keep the rats out.

Everyone went to work swinging their dinner pail. If they were lucky, they might have a West Virginia ham sandwich inside. By the way, that ham is what we call bologna. Miners always left something in their dinner pail in case there would happen to be a cave-in. If they had a lucky day, on the way home they would give their dinner pail to one of the children so they could have a snack.

The GEM of Egypt was a power shovel used for strip mining.

Pictures show some of the large machines that mined the coal on ground level. These included the GEM of Egypt (Giant Excavating Machine at Egypt Valley Mine) and the Mountaineer. In 1955, Mountaineer was the first of the super strippers to work in the coalfields around Cadiz.

Tour buses came to see the Mountaineer, the largest mobile land machine ever produced.

A beautiful 99-seat theater shows films about the coal industry and its history. There is a video presentation produced by AEP telling of the conversion of coal to electricity. Students seeing the video realize how much happens before they can turn on their light switch at home.

A coal crew works at Short Creek mine in 1910.

A Coal Miners’ Reunion is being planned for May in conjunction with the annual Harrison Coal and Reclamation Park dinner auction. All miners past and present are invited to attend.

Coal was delivered by barge on the Ohio River.

The Puskarich Public Library and the History of Coal Museum are open Monday through Thursday from 9 am – 8 pm and Friday from 9am – 5pm. Admission is free but donations are appreciated. Check out their website at www.thecoalmuseum.com for more information.

If you enjoy history, you are sure to enjoy all that has been accumulated at the Coal Mining Museum in Cadiz.

Pea Ohana Watersports for a River Adventure

Want to drift down the river on a sunny afternoon? Pea Ohana Watersports in Zanesville might be the place for you to visit. There you can rent a river tube, kayak, or paddleboard so you can float or paddle the day away as you go down either the Licking or Muskingum Rivers. Opening Day is May 27, 2022.

Bear and Marissa Davis, owners, enjoy life on the river.

While the name may seem strange here in Ohio, Pea Ohana is a famous surfing hotspot in Hawaii on the North Shore of Oahu. That’s a favorite place for Bear Davis and his wife, Marissa to vacation. For added connection, Pea Ohana means Bear Family in Hawaiian. For Bear and Marissa, “Pea Ohana is not just a business, it’s a lifestyle.”

Bear’s ancestors came here from Wales and became coal miners in Coshocton. While the family still owns a farm in Coshocton, the family moved to Newark to work on the canal there. Bear remembers always being around the water. His family would take their boat to different rivers every chance they had.

Over the last several years, Bear has been a lacrosse coach in Division 1 schools and won championships there. He has actually coached lacrosse all over the world and today still helps to coach it in the inner-city in Columbus. But his love for being on the water was always in the back of his mind.

Business partners, Bear and Mark, greet those seeking an adventure on the river.

Bear began looking for a spot to open a business on the river and checked several places. A building became available under Weasel Boy Brewing at 126 Muskingum Avenue along the river in the Putnam district that seemed the perfect spot. There was also a restaurant, Muddy Miser, next door. Bear, his wife Marissa, and a friend Mark Sell are partners in this place for river fun.

Everyone gets their river tubes ready for departure.

At Pea Ohana you can rent kayaks, river tubes, or paddleboards for your adventure on the river. There is a large assortment as they have 700 river tubes, 70 kayaks, and 40 paddleboards at this time. Bear indicated, “Our plan is to create a hub for anything on the water for people who want to try something new.” Families have a blast making new memories on the river.

Group is organized for their gentle ride down the river.

There are different sizes and shapes of tubes to suit your taste. Some of their river tubes have a back support for extra comfort and even a cup holder to soothe your thirst as you drift on the river. Pick your favorite to take you down a four-mile ride on the wild and scenic Licking River over two sets of rapids. Enjoy a splash through the water.

A group of kayaks and river tubes enjoy drifting down the river.

The colorful kayaks come in two shapes. Some of them you can sit down in and others you sit on top. It’s all according to your preference. There are also cooler tubes to carry drinks and snacks for your time of relaxation.

This passenger/equipment bus takes passengers to the starting point of their ride.

They might drop you off in their equipment bus at Dillon Falls for a four-mile stretch on the Licking River. Some make the trip in an hour and a half while others prefer to drift lazily for maybe four hours. Another route begins at their headquarters and goes four miles down the Muskingum River. If you have your own kayak, they are happy to arrange drop-off and pick-up for you.

The fun begins on the bus ride!

Paddleboards are something new and Bear feels it is important to be ready for the experience. It begins at Historic Lock #10 where you first have a yoga class by Yoga Booth to loosen up the muscles for the adventure of using the paddleboard up and down the historic Muskingum River canal in downtown Zanesville.

Great view of the Y Bridge happens along the journey.

While floating down the Muskingum River, passing under the famous Y-bridge is a highlight of the trip. Pea Ohana provides guided tours for the beginner on up. Bear, River Fun Engineer, feels, “A trip to the river with Pea Ohana will be a fun and relaxing way to escape life’s worries for a few hours.”

Pea Ohana provides a great place for family fun.

Everything is done on an individual basis with each person having their own kayak or tube. They do encourage everyone to go with a group for safety purposes and a new group begins hourly as needed. Along the route, there are checkpoints to make certain that no one is having a problem and that all are on track.

Raymond Ramos painted this mural inside the activity center.

Corporate or birthday parties give people a chance to know others on a different level. It’s a relaxing atmosphere to talk with your fellow drifters as you go down the river. After the trip, they have a 6,000 sq. ft. room where you can have a birthday or corporate party.

If you are quick, you might even catch a fish.

They are also opening a site in Columbus this summer at the Boat House Restaurant at 679 Spring Street in Confluence Park. Here you can drift down the Scioto and Olentangy Rivers.

Kayaks and tubes are available for rent Friday through Sunday at Pea Ohana Watersports in Zanesville. Fees for the kayak rentals are $35. Tube rentals are $25. Call 740-297-8798 to make an appointment for an outing Monday through Thursday. Live life today!

Visit their website at http://www.peaohama.com for more information and to make reservations. Take time this summer to enjoy the great outdoors with your family. Bear reminds guests, “ Make magic happen on the river this summer.”

Burley Clay Products Add Beauty to Your Home

Burley Clay Products is located in Roseville in the old McCoy Pottery building,

Their passion is pottery! Burley Clay Products is the only company in the United States that still makes ceramic birdbaths, which are their number one selling item. However, they make other things that will surprise you.

Hand-painted birdbaths are a popular item.

Burley Clay began in 1923 on Maysville Pike in Zanesville when brothers, Zane and Dr. Samuel Burley, became interested in the clay industry. In 1984, the business was sold to Steven McCann, who began looking for a larger facility when in 1998 McCoy Pottery closed its doors and walked away leaving everything inside the plant as it was when work finished that day.

When McCoy closed, they left everything behind just as it was at closing time,

After much cleaning and removal of items, Burley Clay opened their factory at the old McCoy Pottery plant in Roseville in 2000, according to Vice-President Rick Emmert, who began his Burley Clay career in 1987 as an engineer. Rick had a long-time interest in clay as his grandfather owned a ceramic factory in the area and Rick often went to work with him. That led him to a degree in ceramic engineering from Ohio State University.

This WWI propeller was used to dry the pottery gradually at their Maysville plant,

Rick continues to have a deep interest in ceramics and enjoys the creative process. “I think it’s cool to make things from clay.” On the wall in his office, a WWI surplus propeller reminds him of the early days of Burley Clay when it was at the Maysville Pike facility. A dozen of these propellers ran during the night to dry the clay gradually.

This saddle is used in chimneys to reduce pollution and is made daily,

The item his grandfather made is still being made at Burley Clay today. It is a ceramic piece, called a saddle, that is used in industrial towers to help stop pollution. These are made mechanically today by the thousands and they currently have orders that carry them through next January. A popular item!

A fingerprint pad is made for foreign airports,

A fingerprint pad has become important for use in foreign airports. Another item used at airports around the world is an earplug that regulates air pressure while flying. Burley Clay makes the ceramic part while another company finishes the rubber addition. They have thousands of molds that they work with.

Burley Clay gave new life to this old McCoy kiln – “The Cadillac of Kilns.”

One machine, an Allied model, from McCoy Pottery days is still in use after recent repair. It is a unique round kiln that operates 24/7 on a continuous track firing pottery as it goes. It is known as the “Cadillac of Kilns” and produces about 5000 pieces a week.

They feel fortunate there’s a clay field just about a mile from their current facility. This clay was dropped there long ago by a glacier that moved through this section of Ohio. Vein #3 is about 30′ down and provides the fire clay they need. When mined, the clay looks like very hard rocks before they weather it. Then it is mixed into a liquid so they have a slab of clay to work with.

A Burley Clay employee, Cody Beisser, is jiggering a bird bath bowl.

Approximately 70 people run the plant today. Some retire and miss the action so much they return to work. Many have grown up playing as children in the factories of McCoy or Burley when their parents worked there. Family tradition plays a big role in their success. The birdbaths and planters are still all made by hand. Rick admitted, “We still like to do things the old-fashioned way.”

Vice-President Rick Emmert enjoys the creative process and takes pride in their products.

Today, you can buy things in their store at Burley Clay or at one of the stores they supply. Their products are sold all over the country mostly in mom-and-pop stores or nurseries. Items can also be ordered from their website and shipped directly to your home. They ship to about forty states, most of them being in the northeast.

Quality handmade items for the garden are made here.

Burley Clay is well known in the area for its community involvement. Many festivities will find a Burley Clay Birdbath or Planter contributed as part of the raffles or prizes. This also provides a great advertisement for their products.

This year the 56th Crooksville-Roseville Pottery Show will be held at the Roseville Village Park in front of the Burley Clay offices on July 14-16, 2022. Not only will you see fine pottery on display, but can enjoy pottery pitch, the beer garden, and helicopter rides (weather permitting). Check out their Facebook page for up-to-date information.

Their showroom is open all year long.

You know their product is a great one since they have been in business since 1923. Next year they will celebrate their 100th anniversary. Creating a place of beauty and peace for your home is their goal. Enhance your garden with products made in this area.

Great Guernsey Trail Provides Variety of Activities

Enjoy the view from the observation deck at Coal Ridge Park.

Spring is in the air! Take a leisurely walk or bike ride down the seven-mile Great Guernsey Trail that goes from East Cambridge to Lore City. It’s a smooth walk or ride as the trail is paved with asphalt and fairly level. So whether you’re a walker, runner, skateboarder, or cyclist, the trail provides a great place to exercise surrounded by the peacefulness of nature.

This bridge on the trail crosses over Leatherwood Creek.

This all began as a rails to trails project along the old tracks of the CSX Railroad. Leatherwood Creek runs beside the trail for much of the way so you can expect to see waterfowl on your walk. You might also see rabbits, squirrels, bald eagles, deer, and other wildlife as well. You’ll be surprised at all you will discover as you explore the Great Guernsey Trail.

A child walks the trail with their dog. Photo by Cassie Clarkson Photography

Ron Gombeda, Director of CDC which supervises the trail, explained, “The natural beauty along the trail makes it a great place to visit. The habitat assortment of wetlands, woodlands, and creek makes it a great place to view a variety of wildlife.” This trail has recently been given the honor of being designated a National Recreation Trail by the Department of the Interior.

At the Corduroy Road trailhead in East Cambridge, you will find the Guernsey County Archery Range with an elevated shooting platform and the Trailside Skate Park suitable for skateboarding and rollerblades. The Trailside Concession stand sells prepackaged snacks, drinks, and bicycle repair kits during hours of operation. They even have a charger for electric cars at a nominal fee!

The dog parks are a great place to let your dog run free and get some exercise.

Great Guernsey Trail Dog Parks can be found at the Corduroy and the Lore City Trailheads. Dogs like to play too and this gives them a fenced-in place to run freely.

Lore City Park provides the other trailhead for Great Guernsey Trail and has plenty of parking.

The Lore City Trailhead has restrooms, drinking water, and a beautiful playground for the children. It’s also a historical site with a sign telling the story of Civil War General John Hunt Morgan stopping at what was then Campbell’s Station and causing havoc along the famous Morgan’s Raiders Trail.

You might be lucky enough to spot a deer during your walk or ride.

A new trail has been added near the 1.5-mile marker that links the Great Guernsey Trail with Coal Ridge Park and Trails. While the trails here are still unimproved, you’ll find observation platforms and a large pond for fishing and kayaking.

Melissa West and Karly Lyons work on the Earth Science feature at the trail.

Earth Science Education Stations have been created through the assistance of Karly Lyons. These have been placed at various spots along the trail and filled with rocks, fossils, minerals, and other earth-related materials. Learn a little more about our world as you travel the trail.

Find Little Free Libraries along the trail at Cambridge, Kipling, and Lore City.

A Little Free Library has been added to the trail so people can pick up books and leave ones they have already read to share with others. Adult and children’s books are usually available in boxes at Cambridge, Kipling, and Lore City.

Cambridge Rotary and Buckeye Trail students help plant a Butterfly Garden along the trail.

During the spring and summer months, enjoy the many wildflowers that grow along the trail. Stop by the Butterfly Garden which was started by Laura Dunlap. The Cambridge Rotary Club and Buckeye Trail students have helped with planting flowers there to attract the butterflies. It’s a nice stop along the trail.

A Sensory Path provides a series of movements for kids to follow.

There are frequent markers so you know how far you have gone. Benches also appear quite often so you have a place to rest if needed. They’ve thought about everyone when designing this trail.

Families enjoy the wheelchair accessible path.

For those using wheelchairs, the trail is accessible for a relaxing drive in the fresh air. Parking and restrooms are available at the beginning and end of the trail with a portable restroom located midway down the trail.

Three times during the year, the trail sponsors a 5K/10K/ Family Fun Walk with a half marathon, which attracts around 250 participants. The first one will be on May 21 followed by one in August and then December for those who enjoy the cold. All proceeds go to improvements at the trail.

In October, Treats on the Trail gathers at the Lore City Park. There may be close to a thousand people at this event. It is a free event and open to the public with costume contest, prizes, and raffles. Treats are given by many local businesses from Cambridge to Kipling and Lore City.

Maintenance keeps the trail trimmed and cleared all year long.

When it snows, there are a few cross-country skiers who get out early and use the trail before the maintenance crew clears the trail for walkers and bikers. It’s amazing how many different uses this trail has developed and they have plans for more. A five-mile obstacle trail course could be their next project.

Great Guernsey Trail has become a popular spot for outdoor exercise making it necessary to add extra parking at the Corduroy Trailhead. It’s the place where walkers, runners, bicyclists, cross-country skiers, and birdwatchers gather.

Make plans now to enjoy sunshine in nature as you travel the trail at any season of the year.

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