Places to go and things to see by Gypsy Bev

Archive for the ‘Nature’ Category

Ohio Sunday Springtime Drive

Sunday drives have been part of our family tradition since I was a child. Dad always loved to travel those back country roads to see what we could see. Today this gypsy is trying to carry on that tradition as often as possible.

Spring Salt Fork Lake 2   On a recent Sunday afternoon, my car headed out to one of my favorite spots for thinking and dreaming at Salt Fork Lake Dam. From there, it was a matter of luck where the next stops might be. Ride along and see what interesting places appeared along the way.

Spring Hillside   Along the way the trees were finally getting their leaves in that beautiful spring green with some colorful redbuds thrown into the mix to add a little color.

  Spring Plainfield flags     The small town of Plainfield made my heart swell as their main street was lined with the US flag. Houses and businesses all along the street had a flag in their front yard to show their support of our country.

Spring depot   Coming into Coshocton, I spotted an old depot no longer in use but a great reminder of how railroads were an important part of our past.

Spring Roscoe   A drive through Roscoe Village always gives pleasure. Today there were a few people out walking but not much traffic. The little shops along the way looked like they were lonesome for customers.

Spring Clary Gardens   Nearby Clary Gardens has not only a flower garden, but a hillside amphitheater for entertainment and weddings. There is also a lovely Quilt Barn on the premises.

Spring Basket   Down the road at Dresden, you can witness the largest basket in the world. This delightful, small town continues to make handwoven baskets at Dresden & Co.

Spring Whit's   Coming through Zanesville, a Whit’s custard ice cream cone called to me. The flavor of the month was Almond Joy, a delicious treat.

   Hope you enjoyed the ride!

“Chihuly: Celebrating Nature” at Franklin Park Conservatory

Chihuly Annie's Pond

“Anemones and Niijima Floats” can be found at Annie’s Koi Pond. Artwork © Chihuly Studio. All Rights Reserved.

I want my work to appear like it came from nature. So that if someone found it on a beach or in the forest, they might think it belonged there.

~Dale Chihuly

Stunning glass artwork by Dale Chihuly is being featured at Franklin Park Conservatory and Botanical Gardens in Columbus. The vibrant colors make this exhibition glow from within.

     Select pieces of Chihuly have been exhibited at Franklin Park since 2003 when they were honored to be the second botanical garden in the world to host an exhibition by Dale Chihuly. This time they are excited to be able to exhibit their full collection and several pieces on loan, the largest Chihuly collection in a botanical garden.

Chihuly Sunset Tower

“Sunset Chandelier” can be seen suspended in the Pacific Island Biome. Artwork © Chihuly Studio. All Rights Reserved.

     These breathtaking pieces can be found in the Conservatory’s botanical gardens and courtyards. Most of his pieces are inspired and named for objects in nature. In the Pacific Island Water Garden, you can find that awesome Sunset Chandelier.

     Chihuly has been interested in glass since childhood walks on the beaches of Puget Sound where he found little pieces of broken bottles and Japanese floats. However, it wasn’t until he was a student at The University of Washington that he decided to weave some small pieces of glass into his tapestries.

Chihuly Lavender Reeds

“Neodymium Reeds & Green Grass” contain a rare lavender hue. Artwork © Chihuly Studio. All Rights Reserved.

     A few years later, he melted some glass in an oven and blew his first glass bubble. At that moment, this artist decided to be a glassblower. Over the years he has experimented with many old and new techniques to create artistic creations beyond the normal bounds of function and beauty.

Chihuly Ceiling

“Persian Ceiling” contains hundreds of layered blown glass forms. Artwork © Chihuly Studio. All Rights Reserved.

     This creator of unusual glass artwork still makes his home in Seattle where he and his wife, Leslie, take art to places that might not normally see it. They have formed the Leslie and Dale Chihuly Foundation which works with veterans, teenagers, and seniors. The foundation also gives grants each year to two Washington state innovative artists.

Chihuly Macchia

“Macchia” series is aglow with an unbelievable combination of colors. Artwork © Chihuly Studio. All Rights Reserved.

     Glass is the most magical of all materials and is one of the few materials that light can pass through easily. Chihuly was attracted by the way even a small glass opening creates a beautiful object. Color doesn’t seem to matter as he said, “I’ve never met a color I didn’t like.”

     Since an auto accident in 1976 where he lost his left eye, Chihuly has not blown glass himself but oversees a team of skilled glassblowers. He likens himself to the director of a movie or an architect overseeing the project these days. But his mark is still left behind on the productions. Traditional glass factories create perfectly formed vessels while Chihuly lets the glass take its own shape, and irregularity is prevalent.

Chihuly Paintbrushes (2)

“Paintbrushes” is named for the Indian Paintbrush flower.  Artwork © Chihuly Studio. All Rights Reserved.

     Because of interest in glasshouses, his exhibitions have found their way into many botanical garden settings around the world. This outstanding blown glass has been seen from Venice to Jerusalem and Montreal.

     From 1994 to 1996, the artist worked with glassblowers in Finland, Ireland, Mexico, and Italy to create “Chihuly Over Venice” – a series of fifteen Chandeliers which he hung over canals and in piazzas of Venice, one of his favorite cities.

Chihuly Venetian

“Venetian Vase” is overwhelmed by sprouting flowers. Artwork © Chihuly Studio. All Rights Reserved.

     Four years later, his largest public exhibition, “Chihuly in the Light of Jerusalem, 2000” was viewed by over a million visitors at the Tower of David Museum. His creations can be found in over two hundred museums around the world.

     Like many artists, when asked about plans for the future, his response is, “If I knew what was to be created next, I would already have done it.”

Chihuly Blue Garden Fiori

“Blue Garden Fiori” was inspired by his mother’s flower garden. Artwork © Chihuly Studio. All Rights Reserved.

     He does encourage young artists to surround themselves with artists and see as much art as possible. “Create something that nobody has ever seen before.” That’s something that Chihuly has become an expert at doing.

     The full Chihuly: Celebrating Nature will be at Franklin Park Conservatory until March 29. Don’t miss this chance to see beautiful and unique glass creations that are sure to please and surprise you.

     “I want people to be overwhelmed with light and color in some way that they’ve never experienced.” ~Chihuly

Franklin Park Conservatory is in Columbus, Ohio at 1777 E. Broad Street. They have exciting things happening all year long. Pictures in this post were taken by Gypsy Bev and were then approved for publication by Dale Chihuly.

Billy Jacobs Art Gallery – Home to Country Folk Art

Billy relaxes in his gallery

Billy relaxed in his gallery as he talked about his journey.

A country boy at heart describes Billy Jacobs, a man with a great variety of creative skills. Today he is best known for his rural scene paintings, which can be found around the world and at his studio, Billy Jacobs Gallery, in Navarre, Ohio. (more…)

A Simpler Thyme Shares Uses for Herbs

Julia WelcomeFood should be your medicine and medicine should be your food.

Turning your passion into a business creates the perfect way to live. That’s what Julia Brown has done with her passion for herbs, which began with her grandmother. That country grandmother would go out to the garden, gather herbs and whip them up into something that would help their ailments. Julia’s passion and business became “A Simpler Thyme.”

Julia Garden with Doves

This section of her herb garden contained doves.

   While she picked up her love of using natural herbs from her grandmother, Julia never knew what her grandmother was combining. That took time and study by Julia over the past thirty years as she learned how to use herbs both in food and medicine.

Julia Herb Walk

Take an herb walk with Julia after a yoga session.

   Julia is a certified master herbalist and iridology practitioner. For many years she has given classes, presentations on the benefits of herbs, and private consultations.

   In her later years, Julia’s mother lived with them. Mom had lost her sight but her mind still created visions of what she wanted for Julia. They talked about building a cabin behind her house up on the hill. Every night when Julia came home from work, they would discuss the cabin. She told her how to decorate it and even what dishes to use. Mom was a huge part of the cabin.

   Mom told Julia, “You have to promise me you will build your cabin.”

Julia Cabin

Her cabin serves as the perfect place for a quiet retreat or an interesting workshop.

   Julia remembers, “She made my dream come true. The cabin was her vision for me.” Amish built this perfect place for an herbal experience in nature’s own setting. She takes pride in her cabin and conducts workshops there to tell others about the benefits of using herbs for culinary as well as medicinal purposes. Take a beautiful drive through Amish country to rural Fresno to find her business called A Simpler Thyme.

Julia Herb Garden

Her house and cabin are surrounded by herb gardens.

   “God put herbs on this earth for our benefit,” so Julia wants to make people passionate about using herbs and doing things naturally. Everything our body needs is right in front of us, such as herbs, fruits, vegetables, nuts, seeds, grains, trees, water, fresh air, and sunshine.

Julia Sprouting Lentils

Julia always has a jar of sprouting lentils around for a healthy snack.

   We just need to learn how to use them better for ourselves and our families. Using healthy herbs in the food we prepare is an easy way of sneaking medicine to our family.

   She became even more passionate after her back injury in 2012. She fell down the steps and fractured her L5. Doctors wanted to do surgery, but Julia changed her diet and exercised, using food and herbs as her medicine. No surgery was required and her back is fine today.

   Her recent interest is iridology, the study of the human eye. While she cannot diagnose ailments, she can see strengths and weaknesses by looking at the iris of a person’s eye. Your iris serves as a map to your body. The left eye shows the medical history of the mother while the right eye tells that of the father.

Julia Mom's Bedroom with eyes

Julia received the answer as to whether she should study iridology from the quilt in her mom’s bedroom.

   At first, Julia wasn’t certain if she wanted to pursue studying all the needed information. She was looking for a sign to tell her what she should do. She sat down in a rocking chair in her mother’s bedroom and looked at the pattern on the back of the quilt. It looked like there were eyes all over it. At that moment, she felt sure she needed to pursue iridology. The eye is a lamp unto the body and a window to the soul.

Julia Entrance

An old-fashioned outhouse fits the scene perfectly.

   The entire family has helped with the project. Husband Brian and children Autumn and Austin have been instrumental in giving her ideas for giveaways and herbal samples. Workshops will be held a couple of times a month and the schedule can be found on her website www.asimplerthyme.com

Julia Fire Cider

Julia demonstrates making a jar of Fire Cider at a recent workshop.

   Attended an interesting workshop in Newcomerstown with the Friends at the Table, a cookbook club, which meets once a month. The workshop revolved around making Fire Cider, a sure-fire natural remedy for colds. A shot of Fire Cider every twelve hours often gives quick relief.

   Julia’s main goal is educating the public on the many uses of herbs. She stresses, “If you don’t know what the herb or root is, don’t put it in your mouth.”

Julia inside cabin 2

Inside her cabin is a comfortable and quiet place for a workshop.

   Plan to attend one of Julia’s workshops or meet with her for a personal consultation at her comfy cabin. “God provides everything for us and it is up to us to know what to do with it.”

   Herbal Blessings are sent by Julia Brown from A Simpler Thyme.

Historic Lorena Sternwheeler Cruises the Muskingum River

Lorena On the River (2)

The Lorena Sternwheeler cruises up the Muskingum River.

Drift along the Muskingum River on the Lorena Sternwheeler, a piece of Muskingum County history. Sit back and relax as you take a break from the summer heat while listening to the sounds of the old paddlewheel and watching the world drift by.

Lorena Boarding Station

Boarding the sternwheeler takes place in Zane’s Landing Park in Zanesville.

   Walk the gangway to the sternwheeler at Zane’s Landing Park in Zanesville to start your smooth adventure on the Historic Muskingum River Water Trail. Lorena has a fresh coat of shiny white paint with red trim this year so looks extra special. She can carry seventy-five passengers, as they cruise down the same river that those early settlers traveled.

Mrs. Captain Bill

The Captain’s wife, Becky, serves as Social Director and greets visitors as they board.

   Captain Bill Page and his wife Becky, the social director, will greet you as you board ship. They’ll make sure you enjoy the cruise and are treated as special guests. Captain Bill earned his captain’s license when he had a marina in Florida and two scuba diving centers.

Captain Bill at wheel

Lorena Captain Bill has years of experience behind the wheel of a boat.

   After retirement, he and Becky returned to his hometown of Zanesville, where they were searching for a Captain for their sternwheeler. With a little coaxing, Captain Bill agreed to fill that position until they found someone else. That was fifteen years ago! He’s had 35 years of experience as Captain so you’re in good hands on the Lorena.

Lorena - Original at Putnam Landing

The original Lorena in 1800s is shown here at Putnam Landing.

   The original Lorena was launched on the Muskingum River in 1895 The sternwheeler was named for a love song, “Lorena”, written during the Civil War era by a Zanesville minister. It carried freight and passengers from Zanesville to Pittsburgh and back. Her docking place was at the foot of the canal on the north bank of the Muskingum River just below the Sixth Street Bridge.

   The round trip to Pittsburgh and back took about a week. They usually docked at Pittsburgh for two days to let passengers conduct any business they had on shore. There were even staterooms on board if they chose to stay there, rather than at lodging in town.

   No one seems to be certain what happened to the original Lorena. But those original boats were coal-driven and the boilers on many of them could not handle the switch to diesel.

Lorena Shore Scene

Scenes along the river add to the enjoyment of the trip.

   In 1972, Zanesville decided to search for a paddle wheeler to bring to the Zane’s Trace Commemoration on June 17-19. Their search led them to the Bryce M. located in Arkansas, where it had been used as a tugboat on the Arkansas River. It was renovated to look as close as possible like those boats that traveled the Muskingum in the early 1900s.

Lorena Paddlewheel

Sounds of the paddlewheel follow the Lorena on the river.

   This seemed to be a good promotion for the beautiful Muskingum River, Ohio’s largest inland waterway. Plus it would give area residents and visiting tourists a chance to take a leisurely hour ride on the river at a reasonable charge on the $100,000 sternwheeler.

   In order to arrive in Zanesville, the Lorena had to remove its wheelhouse to pass under the low bridge at McConnelsville, and some other low cables along the way. Though a little late, the Lorena did arrive on Saturday, when it began giving rides on the Muskingum River.

Lorena - Nearly Capsized January '78

This newspaper clipping shows the Lorena nearly capsized during a winter storm in 1978.

   It received worldwide coverage during the Blizzard of ’78 when it was within a quarter-inch of capsizing. This was one of the worst winter storms to hit Ohio in the 20th Century. With 13 inches of snow and winds over 50 mph, temperatures reached sub-zero wind chill. No wonder the Lorena had problems.

Lorena Muskingum River

The Muskingum River stretches from Coshocton to Marietta through a series of locks and dams.

   Cruises last about an hour and travel a three-mile stretch of the Muskingum River. Captain Bill reports that he has seen many varieties of fish and birds, some that he only thought would be in Florida. His sense of humor was evident when he smiled and said, “I haven’t seen an alligator, but I’m still looking.”

Lorena Driver

Kids of all ages enjoy “Steer the Boat Day” with help from Captain Bill.

   There are many events throughout August that you and your family are certain to enjoy. Coupons are being given for various other area attractions when you ride the Lorena. For example: “Libraries Rock” gives you a coupon for a free book at the Muskingum County Library.  On “Steer the Boat Day”, you can become Captain and steer the boat for a short time.  “A Tasty Cruise” provides a bag of Conn’s potato chips to each guest.

   It’s also available for lunch and dinner cruises, birthday and anniversary parties, or just to take your group for a ride down the river.  Meals are provided by Classic Fare Catering, who always provide tasty dishes.

   Parking is free and close to the sternwheeler entrance. Check out their schedule and see when you might be able to enjoy a relaxing ride down the Muskingum River.

The Lorena is docked in Zane’s Landing Park in Zanesville. Exit I-70 and head east a block and turn right onto Market Street. Take Market Street nearly to the end and look for the park entrance on the right-hand side. You’ll be ready to enjoy a ride on the Muskingum River.

 

 

 

 

Life is an Adventure for Jo Lucas Master Gardener of the Year 2018

 

Jo Turkey hunting 001

Turkey hunting has been a long time family tradition.

Everywhere she goes, Jo Lucas finds something to enjoy. For her, life is discovering new things on a daily basis. Part of this she credits to meeting the love of her life, Don Lucas, who had a spirit of adventure like no other.

   Their adventure began in Cody, Wyoming where they were married…with an elk hunt for a honeymoon. Since then hunting, fishing, gardening and many other activities filled their lives until just recently when Don died as a result of an accident.

   Their adventures could fill a book and have created many fond memories for her. They made friends wherever they went.

Jo with bear 001

Don and Jo with the bear she shot in New Hampshire.

   In New Hampshire, they both shot a bear and the bearskins still hang in her house today. She was sitting in a log yard when a bear appeared lumbering through the logs, getting closer and closer. She decided there was no choice but to shoot it and killed it with one shot.

   But bears aren’t the only thing on her hit list. Moose, elk, antelope, turkeys and other small game have all been part of her adventures from Maine to Alaska. She’s visited 49 of the 50 states with Hawaii still on her bucket list.

Jo Ice Fishing 001

Ice fishing in Maine was a very cold but fun experience.

   Ice fishing in Maine provided an unusual experience as temperatures were down to -20 and -30 degrees when they took a snowmobile out on the ice. Sometimes when they were ice fishing, they had a portable shanty to use as a windbreak. In Alaska, salmon fishing captured their attention.

Jo Cooking Tent 001

Their cooking tent is packed with supplies.

   Sometimes they used a camper, but most often tents. They had a special cook tent and then several sleeping tents a short distance away just in case an animal would decide to invade the cook tent overnight. Two dogs and a pistol kept her feeling a little safer wherever she happened to camp.

Jo Farmers Market

Jo sold her salsa and jams at the local Farmers’ Market.

   Back home in Guernsey County, Jo enjoyed large gardens and a fruit orchard. From these, she made delicious salsas and jams that she sold at the Farmers’ Market during the summer season.

   As a youngster, she grew up in the 4-H program in the Millersburg area, where horses were her passion and project. But on Thanksgiving, everyone went turkey hunting. It was a family tradition!

Jo salmon 001

Fishing for salmon in Alaska was a real success.

   Since Jo’s move to Guernsey County, she has been involved in the community in so many ways. Jo was the auxiliary president who brought back the idea for Wonderland of Trees at the hospital. That first year, there were six trees and six wreaths.

Jo fruit trees covered

Fruit trees are covered with parachutes to keep birds from eating the fruit.

   Other community organizations that are lucky to have her assistance are the Soil & Water Conservation Board (vice-chairman), Ohio Association of Garden Clubs (district treasurer), Mt. Herman Church (treasurer), Hopewell Homemakers, and Adair Ladies Bible Study at Antrim. Perhaps it should be mentioned that Jo has a degree in accounting.

Jo Raspberries 001

Her raspberry patch is used for jams, pies, or just a bowl of berries!

   In the last couple of years, she decided to go back to that early passion from 4-H of training and showing horses. These days she assists at Breaking Free Therapeutic Riding Center near Norwich. This facility helps the handicapped improve their physical, psychological and cognitive behaviors through association with a friendly horse. Veterans are always welcome.

   Working here has given Jo real pleasure as she volunteers as barn manager. She gets horses ready for riding by exercising them beforehand. Yes, sometimes she even rides herself.

Jo Tomatoes 001

Her delicious salsa was made possible through this large tomato patch.

   Jo Lucas loves the out-of-doors in so many ways but gardening is one of her favorites. She was recently named OSU Extension Guernsey County Master Gardener of 2018, a well-deserved honor. Jo was one of those original Guernsey County Master Gardeners.

   She remembers her days in 4-H and all the help the advisors gave, so felt it was her turn to “give back” to the community. She has shared her knowledge of gardening with hundreds of Guernsey County elementary school children.

Jo Cherry Tree Pruning

These trees were used to demonstrate proper pruning methods.

   Ag school days, master gardener classes and workshops are a few of the ways that she has given back. Over the past few years, she has hosted three pruning workshops at her home.

Jo Lucas and Clif Little

Clif Little presents Jo with the Master Gardener of the Year Award.

   Local OSU Extension Educator, Clif Little, praised Jo by saying, “I can sum up her work as a Master Gardener volunteer as hard-working, energetic, friendly, generous and very interested in learning. She is the type of person that will always help when we offer gardening classes.” That says it all!

Jo Flowers 001

This flower bed contains crazy daisies, daylilies and iris.

But one place that Jo is a bit dangerous is in a plant nursery. She enjoys trying new plants and searches for them wherever she goes. Sometimes she comes home with almost too many.

   There are still a few places on her bucket list and both relate to ancestry. Her grandparents came from Austria and Ireland so those are two places she would enjoy exploring.

Bear Skin 2

This bearskin hanging on her wall at home makes her smile as she remembers her adventures.

   Of one thing you can be certain, Jo Lucas will not be sitting in a rocking chair watching the world go by. She’s always ready for an adventure as she strives to learn something new each day.

If you have interest in becoming a Master Gardener in Guernsey County, contact Clif Little in the Guernsey County Extension Office at 740-489-5300.

Busy Season for Senecaville Fish Hatchery

Hatchery Welcome SignSenecaville State Fish Hatchery is among the nation’s best hatcheries. Each year, approximately 20 – 25 million fish are raised here by the ODNR Division of Wildlife. They supply lakes and reservoirs around Ohio, as well as six pools in the Ohio River and 10 pools in the Muskingum River.

   Since approximately 1.3 million people go fishing in Ohio each year, it has become necessary to assist with the natural propagation of fish in Ohio waters. ODNR operates six fish hatcheries throughout Ohio for this purpose.

 

Hatchery Overlook

The bridge over the dam makes a great place to get an overview of the hatchery.

   The Senecaville Fish Hatchery is located in southern Guernsey County just below the dam on beautiful Seneca Lake. Beginning as a federal hatchery in 1938, when they first raised striped bass to replenish dwindling fish supplies, the hatchery now has 37 ponds containing a total of 37 water acres. Water is supplied by Seneca Lake, which can deliver 2,000 gallons per minute.

 

Hatchery Egg Jar

Casey Goodpaster displays the incubator jar where eggs are kept until hatched.

   Fish hatchery technicians, Casey Goodpaster and Josh Binkley, have been there about fifteen years each. Both have gone to college and have degrees in Parks and Recreation, and Fish Management respectively. These men do much more than care for fish as they often become mechanics, painters, welders, and mowers at the facility. They enjoy the freedom of spending much of their time outside.

 

Getting eggs

Eggs are being stripped from a walleye into a large bowl at Mosquito Lake.

   This is the time of year when the fish hatchery at Seneca Lake is busiest of all. In early March, the fish hatchery collects about 300 quarts of walleye fish eggs from Mosquito Lake in the Youngstown area. This adds up to around 20–30 million eggs!

W alleye released to the lake

Once the eggs have been gathered from the fish, the walleye are placed back into the lake.

 

Hatchery net

Josh Binkley uses a net to gather the fingerlings from the collection tank.

   The eggs are then fertilized and about three quarts are put into each incubator tube. Water must move through the tubes constantly to keep the eggs from sticking together. It takes two to three weeks for them to hatch before moving up the tubes and into a holding tank.

  Walleye

saugeye

The saugeye is a combination of a female walleye pictured above and the male sauger below.

   Often they cross a female walleye with a male sauger to create saugeye. This is done with about fifty percent of the walleye eggs since the saugeye have a much higher survival rate. Saugeye are well suited for Ohio reservoirs and grow rapidly.

 

Fingerling

Fingerlings are very small but ready for the lake.

   The newly hatched fish is called a ‘fry’ and is about the length of half an eyelash, according to one technician. Finally, the last juvenile stage is that of a fingerling about 15 cm long. At this time, they can be placed directly into the lake.

catfish

Catfish are raised in June and July and kept in the hatchery ponds for about a year.

A little later in the year in June and July, the hatchery will be raising channel catfish. They lay their eggs in a spawn inside a can placed in the ponds. These layers of eggs are then gently moved inside to hatch in five to seven days. After being fed fish meal for about a week, they quadruple their size and are then placed in the ponds for up to a year before stocking them in lakes and streams.

 

Hatchery ODNR sign

ODNR took over operations at the hatchery in 1987.

   When fishermen purchase rods, reels, fishing tackles, fish finders and motorboat fuel, they pay an excise tax. The federal government collects these taxes and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service distributes the funds to state fish and wildlife agencies. These funds acquire the habitat, stock the fish, provide education and develop boat accesses.

 

Seneca Lake Fish Hatchery

This airplane view captures the entire hatchery complex at Senecaville.

    At the Senecaville Fish Hatchery, there are four full-time employees and one part-time in the summer. Employees receive annual training through workshops regarding many topics from chain saw cutting to herbicides, fish and more.

 

Hatchery Stocking Truck

Their stocking truck carries oxygen and a water pump to keep the water moving.

    Senecaville Fish Hatchery is open to the public Monday – Friday from 10:00-3:00. This is also a great place for a group tour, especially school children, to see how the facility operates and learn more about the varieties of fish. Watch for special times when youngsters can fish at the hatchery.

   The best times to view the hatchery in operation are from April through June. They will begin to get eggs in the hatchery during the month of March. A visit to the Senecaville Fish Hatchery would be a great family experience.

Senecaville Fish Hatchery is located on beautiful Seneca Lake in Guernsey County with easy access from I-77 exit 37. Take OH 313 east about six miles and turn right on OH 574. The hatchery is on the right-hand side.

Tag Cloud