Places to go and things to see by Gypsy Bev

Archive for July, 2016

Summer Relaxation at Seneca Lake

Step away from the hustle and bustle of life. Relax as you drift along on the placid water of Seneca Lake, the third largest inland lake in Ohio, touching Guernsey and Noble Counties. Not many places still provide such a peaceful atmosphere.

Sailing along on Seneca Lake

Sailing along on Seneca Lake

Built in 1937 to control floods on the Seneca Branch of Wills Creek, today Seneca Lake Park provides the perfect place for a permanent camping spot, a getaway weekend, or just an evening escape.You can hear the pride in their voices as residents and frequent campers tell about the wonders of Seneca Lake.

Here you can find entertaining things to occupy your time, or sit in the shade of a tree and watch the world go by. Being at Seneca Lake makes you feel like you’ve stepped out of this regular busy world, and been given permission to unwind.

Seneca Lake

Seneca Lake under a cloud filled sky

When you think about going to the lake, boating, fishing, and swimming come to mind. And those things are all part of the charm of Seneca Lake, which some call East Central Ohio’s Playground. But there’s more.

Seneca Lake Fish Hatchery

Aerial view of the Senecaville Fish Hatchery and its 37 ponds.

Here you will also find the Senecaville State Fish Hatchery, which supplies fish- over twenty million in April alone – to over fifty different lakes as well as the Ohio and Muskingum Rivers. They have 37 one-acre ponds where walleye, saugeye, hybrid striped bass and channel catfish are raised.

Their campground has the honor of being the fullest campground in the Muskingum Watershed District. Once people discover this treasure, they come back frequently. There are a limited number of rental cabins, so bring along your tent or camper for a pleasurable stay.

Seneca Lake Beach

Families enjoy the activities of the beach area.

The recently installed water toy makes the beach even more fun for the children.It resembles the American Ninja Warrior Course and keeps the children squealing with pleasure.

Moms can sit under the shade of a tree while keeping an eye on the children. A concession stand nearby provides cool drinks and snacks as needed. If you decide to have a family gathering, a shaded picnic area complete with grills and picnic tables is located very close to the beach.

Their campground has the honor of being the fullest campground in the Muskingum Watershed District. Once people discover this hidden treasure, they come back again and again. There are a limited number of cabins for rent,so you might want to bring along your tent or camper for a pleasurable stay.

Seneca Lake Pontoon

Rent a pontoon boat at the marina for an enjoyable ride around the lake.

Seneca Lake is a Boater’s Paradise, where courtesy is practiced on the water. There are some special places that are only available by boat, such as a boater’s beach, volleyball sand bar and picnic on the Big Island.

If you need a way to get out on the water for the day, Seneca Lake Marina has pontoons, kayaks, canoes and fishing boats available for rent. With 3,550 acres of water, ski boats, jet skis, and sail boats will most likely drift past. You can rent a boat for a couple hours or a few days.

Seneca Lake Marina

Dockside Restaurant provides a great place to relax here at the Marina.

Need a vacation from cooking? Dockside Restaurant provides a menu where you might enjoy Big Island Nachos, Camp Fire Fries, or BBQ delights from their smoker which are sure to please your family. Have a delicious meal while sitting out on the deck with a grand view of the lake.

Seneca Lake Crane 2

A sand crane takes a stroll along the water’s edge.

While there you might spot the nest of an osprey, watch a sand crane feed along the water’s edge, or see numerous varieties of ducks and geese floating along with the boats. Wonder what animals are lurking in the surrounding woods?

The best feature of Seneca Lake may be that it’s family friendly. Everyone looks out for everyone else. For those who enjoy time near or on the water, Seneca Lake Park is a great place for a family picnic  or a hike on one of their many hiking trails. It’s one of those special places that families return to year after year.

Be soothed by the water of Seneca Lake sometime soon.

 

 

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Every Body’s Got Rhythm

Drums Used

The Drum Circle used a wide variety of drums, such as djembe, ashiko, and tubano.

Drums! To many people the word means noise – loud noise. In truth, they set the background beat for most musical performances. But drums can also capture the rhythm of the mind, body and spirit through a little special training.

Toni Kellar does just that. Her programs, Roots to Rhythm, teach students and adults to explore their body’s rhythm through Drum Circles.  Using percussion instruments and body movements, Toni helps others find their inner beat as their creativity is boosted.

While Toni did play the snare drum in high school as a member of her marching band, it wasn’t until later in life that she discovered hand-drumming. This opened new doors for her that she had never experienced before.

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Toni shares her passion for drumming so others will find their “Roots to Rhythm”.

The name Roots to Rhythm developed as Toni felt that she was returning to her “roots” as she found a special way to share her love of “rhythm” with others. She uses the metaphor of a tree to explain her passion since the roots of the tree reach deep down for nourishment to provide food for the tree to branch out.

Her programs provide that nourishment. Starting with everyone sitting in a circle, Toni begins a basic beat on her drum, encouraging everyone to find their beat through their hands. In just a little while, she begins passing out shakers, wood blocks, and tambourines to let others experience the percussion instruments.

Kristopher

This young man takes pride in his drumming abilities. It seems the fellow drummers agree by the smiles on their faces.

Some are reluctant to join the drumming at the beginning but that soon changes. Soon there is a sparkle in their eyes and a smile on their face as they play a drum for the first time in their lives, and feel a different rhythm in their body. Adults feel young again as they do something new that perhaps feels a little silly… but is so much fun.

Then it’s time for everyone to select their own percussion instrument. What excitement to choose the piece that suits your mood. Toni starts a beat but encourages everyone to find their own beat even if it doesn’t seem to match hers. Before long the beats blend together perfectly.

Drumming explanation

Various drums and percussion instruments were explained by Toni.

Then others are called to lead the beat and partners are selected across the room to match rhythms. Time flies by as the volume changes as well as the rhythm. Loud…then soft…loud…soft. Feel the relaxation taking place as the instruments reach a quiet level. Before the evening is finished, there was a feeling of oneness as drumming not only connects to their personal rhythm, but had joined the inner rhythm of everyone in the group.

One of Toni’s most rewarding experiences was in an assisted living community where the residents danced, sang and encouraged each other to join in the drumming. This is what normally happens in this setting. However, this time the residents were Alzheimer patients and it was the first time they had reached out for that kind of interaction with each other.

Drum Circle

Toni shows calmness as she helps others find their inner rhythm.

Group drumming not only has many health benefits, but it increases the closeness of people within a group. Roots to Rhythm provides programs for corporate and professional development, health and wellness, school and youth, as well as community groups.

Professional training becomes a requirement for learning methodology to lead drum circles. Toni has completed several drum circle facilitator programs and continues enriching her life with Drumming and World Percussion workshops.

Drums Hands On

Young and old alike enjoy finding that inner rhythm.

Roots to Rhythm is not musical or spiritual, but directs everyone to express their inner rhythms. Some find relaxation, while others find it energizing – maybe even both at the same time.

For more information about Roots to Rhythm, contact Toni at http://www.rootstorhythm.com .

 

Cambridge Glass Goes Hollywood

Hooray for Hollywood and Cambridge Glass!

Betty

Betty Sivard. a long time volunteer, tells visitors about Cambridge Glass used in Hollywood and on television.

It’s not surprising that the famous Cambridge Glass has been used in countless movies over the years as it exudes glamour as well as beauty. Several of these pieces are being featured in two large showcases  at the National Museum of Cambridge Glass  in Cambridge, Ohio, along with photos and cards designating the movies and stars.

Throughout the display of over 6,000 pieces of the collectible Cambridge Glass, other references to Hollywood movies and television shows appear frequently. A few years back a member spotted a piece of Cambridge Glass being used in a movie. After reporting this to the group, all eyes became focused on glassware used in movies. You’ll be surprised  at how often Cambridge Glass appears.

Elvis Presley

This beverage set was used on Elvis Presley’s plane, The Lisa Marie, which was named after his daughter.

This locally made fine glassware isn’t seen only in older movies. Recently, The Astronaut Wives Club toasted a special moment with Cambridge Rose Point Stemware. In the current series, Empire, stars used an Amethyst Decanter and Sherries.

White Christmas

Bing Crosby holds an engraved Bexley champagne glass in White Christmas. It’s a museum favorite!

It’s impressive to think that local men and women had a hand in producing exquisite glass items that are fine enough quality to be used in Hollywood and television. A favorite on display shows  Bing Crosby holding an engraved Bexley champagne glass in the year-after-year favorite of White Christmas.

Cambridge Glass Hollywood Stars

When group tours request a Hollywood program, these volunteers represent White Christmas (Cindy Arent), Astronaut Wives Club (Sandi Rohrbough), Mae West (Sharon Bachna), and Gunsmoke (Sarah Carpenter).

If you are interesting in the Hollywood presence of Cambridge Glass, arrangements can be made by tour groups to have volunteers entertain in costume and even break into song. Groups might hear The Haynes Sisters sing, “Sisters, sisters, there were never such devoted sisters…”  Or meet Mae West as she flings her boa and entertains the crowd.

The museum has created a DVD showing some of the movies as well as the Cambridge Glass used, so you know what to look for throughout the museum. The volunteers will then serve as your guides for your stay at the museum.

The Sting

On each end of the bar, The Sting used a Crown Tuscan Flying Lady Bowl filled with peanuts.

These guides not only know their glassware well, but they tell interesting stories along the way. An example would be the story of the Crown Tuscan Flying Lady Bowl used in The Sting.

In the early days of Cambridge Glass Co, a circus came to town. Several of the glassworkers attended the event. One of those had artistic talents and drew a picture of the trapeze artist performing that day. That picture was taken back to a talented mold maker, who developed this artistic Flying Lady Bowl. What talented men!

Even the western television shows used Cambridge Glass for a touch of glamour. In an episode of Gunsmoke, a little girl was casting her eyes on an etched Portia Doulton water pitcher. The Wild Wild West used a Cambridge Glass perfume atomizer as part of its background.

Clark Gable

This beautiful Royal Blue Luncheon Set was a wedding gift to Clark Gable and Carole Lombard.

A personal favorite was the Cambridge Royal Blue and Crystal luncheon set that Clark Gable and Carole Lombard received as a wedding present from a friend in Ft. Wayne, Indiana back in 1939. Nice to know the stars actually used this fine glassware in their homes as well as in the movies.

Prizzi's Honor

This eye-catching Royal Blue pitcher with silver overlay was used in Prizzi’s Honor.

While there are too many to list in this short article, a few favorites have been mentioned. Perhaps they will give you a desire to search out more Hollywood appearances throughout the museum yourself.

You’ll be impressed.

The National Museum of Cambridge Glass is located at 136 S. 9th Street just a half block off Wheeling Avenue in downtown Cambridge, Ohio.

 

 

 

 

Drift Along on the Monticello III Canal Boat at Roscoe Village

 

Monticello sign

Look for this sign off Route 83 near Coshocton to find the Canal Boat Landing.

The smoothest ride you’ve ever had!

That describes the trip along the restored Ohio-Erie Canal near Roscoe Village. Two horses, Rock and Bill, slowly walk the original tow path as they gently pull a replica of the canal boats that traveled this same route in the early 1800s. Sit back and relax on this forty minute ride while you listen to the captain tell the story of life on the canal.

Monticello horses

Bill and Rock, two huge draft horses, wait patiently in their stable.

Two Percheron horses pull the Monticello III canal boat quite easily. The hoggee, or horseman, leads them along the tow path. He uses 150′ of rope to guide them as they pull with great ease this flat bottomed boat weighing twenty-five tons.

In 1803, the need for a canal was evident. They would place a boat carrying goods on the Muskingum River, and it would drift downstream to the spot in Marietta where it met the Ohio River. They had no way to get the boat back upstream, so they had to dismantle the boat and carry it piece by piece to be reassembled. The canal eliminated that problem.

Monticello hogie walks horses

The hoggee walks along the original canal towpath as he guides the horses.

Ground breaking for the canal began in 1825.The canal was built by Irish immigrants, who worked for 30 cents a day and four jiggers of whiskey. The need for whiskey came into play to avoid the condition known as canal fever.

First, the canal was dug by hand to a depth of four feet, then lined with clay to make a sturdy bottom. How did they pack the clay? With a sheep-foot roller – a herd of sheep ran over it to smooth it.

Completion occurred in 1832, seven years later. Transportation at that time gave few choices – either a stagecoach or a passenger boat. Rates for the boats were fifty cents a day, which included room and board, while stagecoach fares were typically five cents a mile.

Monticello turning

Monticello III gives a smooth ride that is certain to relax you.

Often three hundred boats traveled on the canal at one time. Passing became the real challenge as their tow ropes could easily get tangled. This intricate job fell to the hoggees, the boys who guided not only the horses, but also the tow ropes. Quite often they were teenage orphans with no other way to find food and shelter.

Former president, James Garfield, worked as a hoggee in 1847 when he was a teenager. The story was told that Garfield fell into the canal so often, he became ill. After that experience, that young man decided that college would be a better choice.

Monticello on the canal

Everyone enjoys their trip down the restored Ohio-Erie Canal.

Captains often lived in the cabin on the boats with their family. The females of the family would be the cooks and do household tasks as they traveled on the canal. All garbage and waste was thrown to the towpath side. So if the cooks needed extra water for cooking they would dip it from the side opposite the towpath.Turtle soup was a favorite treat.

Monticello mileage sign

This sign at the edge of the landing tells distances from the Roscoe Port to Cleveland and Portsmouth.

As humorous as it may sound, there was a speed limit for boats on the canal to keep the banks from eroding. Four miles an hour was the limit and they were fined for speeding. Speed was determined by how long it took to get from one lock to the next.

Monticello map

This map of Ohio shows the route on the eastern side of the Ohio-Erie Canal from Cleveland to Marietta and Portsmouth.

In 1913, a major flood throughout Ohio wiped out the Erie Canal. Parts of it still exist today from Cleveland to Portsmouth. View a bit of history and take the smoothest ride imaginable at Roscoe Village sometime this summer. It’s relaxing!

The canal boat ride at Roscoe Village is seasonal from Memorial Day to Labor Day on Tuesday – Saturday at 1:00, 2:00, and 3:00 and Sunday at 1:00 and 2:00.

A Visit with Centenarian Frances Mehaffey

Frances Mehaffey 2010 001

This special recent portrait shows that Frances still has style.

Most of us dream about living a long life. For Frances Mehaffey that dream is reality. At over 101 years young, Frances still enjoys a busy life. This amazing woman has a quick sense of humor and enjoys sharing stories of life as it used to be.

Frances Hartley was born in October, 1914 in Cambridge, Ohio at her parents’ home near Garfield School. Her mother told her the children were singing and playing “London Bridge” on the playground at the time of Frances’ birth. She has been entertaining others with music ever since.

While she never liked dolls, she remembered a swing and a wagon her father bought her when she was a child. The family moved often. When they lived next door to an early oil well in the county, Frances decided she would use a stick to drill her own oil wells in the dirt. She has been busy all of her life.

Peggy and Frances

Peggy and mother Frances enjoy sharing memories over a cup of coffee.

With three children, her parents also stayed busy. Father drove a horse and buggy to deliver mail in the summer time, and rode horseback in the winter. Mother gave piano lessons after studying music at Mt. Union. Frances learned to play piano and organ.

When Frances was ten, the family moved back to Cambridge where several ladies wanted her to cut and set their hair. She walked from house to house after school doing something that came to her naturally…without ever going to beauty college.

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An early picture shows Frances about the time of graduation from Cambridge Brown High School.

She graduated from Cambridge Brown High School in 1933. Her current beauty license, which she received in 1934, is the oldest in the state. She was honored by the State of Ohio Board of Cosmetology with a reception and proclamation of “Frances H. Mehaffey Day” on December 10, 2014.

Frances opened her first salon in the back of her father’s wallpaper store, followed by one over the old Strand Theater. She then opened the “Town and Country”, which she operated until a few years ago, and a second salon in Quaker City for several years. That’s over 90 years of making ladies beautiful!

John and Frances Mehaffey eloped to Wellsburg, WV in 1937, but no one knew they were married for several. months. When they moved to the country, their first home had no electricity, a hand pump outside for water, and an outdoor toilet. How life has changed.

While she was too busy to travel often, she remembers one trip to Texas where they stood in line all day long to watch part of the Lee Harvey Oswald trial.

Frances Family Peggy Dr. John%2c Frances and Tom 001 (2)

Her children gathered for a surprise 100th birthday celebration. They include: Peggy Ringer,  Dr. John, mother Frances, and Tom. Frances has 8 grandchildren, 9 great-grandchildren, and 1 great-great grandchild.

While raising their three children and operating her beauty salons, Frances planned and wrote scripts for PTA programs, started the cafeteria at Pike School and helped start the Cassell Station Fire Department. Square dancing, Buggy Wheel Riding Club, and the Organ Club added enjoyment to her busy life.

Later she formed and wrote the theme song for the “Kitchen Kuties”, who performed for many organizations. Over a cup of coffee during this visit, Frances broke into song singing, “We are the Kitchen Kuties…”  Watching TV and reading books are not high on her list even today

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Linda Johnson and Frances visit before a Lions Club Show.

Frances and John helped Bob Jonard get the Lions Club Minstrel started back in 1973. That first year she helped organize the musical performances and write the program. She  headed makeup for the Minstrels for 39 years. Althought Frances stopped singing in the chorus a couple years ago, she still attends the Lions Club Shows and enjoys them thoroughly.

She even attends the Afterglow following the show. This year it was held on the second floor of a local club, but that didn’t stop Frances. She climbed those stairs better than some that are in the chorus today. When asked how she could still climb steps so well, she matter-of-factly remarked, “When I was 93, I had both knees replaced and I’ve been able to climb stairs ever since.”

Frances 100 001

Frances was happy to have knee replacements to help her walk more easily.

You might wonder what her secret is for being a centenarian. Frances will only say that she worked hard all of her life. She never smoked or drank, takes a daily vitamin but only two prescription medications, and attends First Methodist Church in Cambridge each Sunday. Although she no longer drives, Frances renewed her driver’s license on her 100th birthday.

When she was asked about working so hard throughout life, Frances responded with a powerful bit of advice for everyone, “If you don’t, you waste it. You don’t want to waste life.”

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