Places to go and things to see by Gypsy Bev

Archive for June, 2018

Temperance Tavern Museum Holds Tales of Newcomerstown Area

Temperance Tavern Sign

This sign in front of the museum explains the history of the town.

The Delaware Indians settled a village along the Tuscarawas River at what is today Newcomerstown. In 1776, over 700 Delaware Indians lived there with a few English colonists. The Indians called their village Gekelemukpechunk, but the settlers called it Newcomerstown after the Delaware Chief Newcomer of the Turtle Tribe.

Temperance Tavern Delaware Indians

These Delaware Indians arrowheads and artifacts are an important part of the town’s history.

   During the time of the Ohio & Erie Canal, the tavern and inn in Newcomerstown, Ohio was a popular stop for canal boats. One of the oldest homes in town, built in 1841 by Andrew Creter, Temperance Tavern was made of black walnut and still contains many of the original features.

Temperance Tavern

Temperance Tavern Museum, a beautiful old tavern and inn, is one of the oldest homes in Newcomerstown.

   The home and tavern was conveniently built between the canal and the stagecoach trail. One home on Canal Street still has the original canal ditch in their front yard. The ditch was never filled in.

   The Creter family lived on the first floor, while rooms on the second floor housed only women. Single men were literally locked in the attic to keep any embarrassing moments from happening with the lady guests. The basement contained Temperance Tavern. While the names don’t seem to fit together perfectly, no alcohol was served in this tavern.

   Miss Elizabeth, wife of Andrew Creter, still visits the house in spirit. While her form is seldom seen, frequently doors move and cabinets open. She keeps watch over her house.

Temperance Tavern Fireplace

This stone fireplace provided a place to cook meals for visitors to the inn.

   The kitchen has a large fireplace where all the tavern meals were cooked. The cast iron utensils hung over the fireplace for easy access in meal preparation. Meals were cooked and served here for people from the canal and stage, but it was also a local gathering place. The table served not only as a place for meals, but operations took place there as well.

Temperance Tavern Oven

Behind this cabinet was where slaves were hidden on the Underground Railroad.

   This was also a stop for the Underground Railroad. Slaves were hidden in the cellar of this house. You can still see a cabinet that concealed where slaves hid on their Underground Railroad route.

Temperance Tavern Miss Rose Tea Set

This beautiful Moss Rose Tea Set came all the way from Virginia in 1820.

   The dining room table displayed a beautiful Moss Rose Tea Set, which was brought to Newcomerstown from Virginia in 1820 by Mrs. John Snyder. The living room features military artifacts as well as a collection of dresses from the 1800-1900 time frame.

Temperance Tavern Wedding Dress

The wedding dress of Maude Scott highlights this display of clothing from 1800-1900.

   A wedding dress from 1894 belonging to Maude Scott shows the style of the time. It also gives history of one of those early prominent women in the Tuscarawas County area. Maude Scott was the first woman in the county to be elected to public office and formed the first Republican Women’s Club there, a couple examples of her forward thinking.

   Here also, you will find memorabilia honoring two of Newcomerstown’s favorite sons, Cy Young, the most winning pitcher in baseball, and Woody Hayes, Ohio State’s well-known and adored coach.

Temperance Tavern Woody

Woody Hayes, Ohio State University football coach, went to school here.

   Woody’s dad was superintendent of schools in Newcomerstown. After graduation from Newcomerstown High School, Woody coached football at Mingo Junction and New Philadelphia before moving on to Ohio State.

Temperance Tavern Cy Young

This 1908 Boston Red Sox uniform belonging to Cy Young is on display at the museum.

   One special item in the museum is Cy Young’s complete 1908 Boston Red Sox uniform. The memorabilia span his life from baseball player to retiree, who enjoyed sitting on his front porch in a rocking chair, which is also in the museum today. From 1890-1911, Young won 511 games with an ERA if 2.63. No wonder he is a local hero.

Temperance Tavern Civil War Monument

Outside the museum stands a monument to Freeman Davis, a local Civil War hero.

   Outside the Temperance Tavern Museum is a monument honoring Freeman Davis, a local man who earned the Congressional Medal of Honor during the Civil War. Davis served as a sergeant with Company B, 80th Ohio Volunteer Infantry during the war and his commendation came due to his bravery in the Battle of Missionary Ridge in Tennessee.

Main Street BJ

BJ McFadden has served as president of the Newcomerstown Historical Society for several years but recently stepped down from that post.

   Located at 221 Canal Street in Newcomerstown, the Temperance Tavern Museum opens its doors each Memorial Day weekend through the end of October on Tuesday – Sunday. Every small town has interesting history to share. Stop by and explore Temperance Tavern Museum this summer!

The museum is located at 221 West Canal Street in Newcomerstown, Ohio. Off I-77, take Exit 65 for US 36, Turn left on US 36 and then take the second exit, Ohio 258, to Newcomerstown to the left onto Pilling Street. After a short distance, turn right onto East Canal Street and about a mile down the street you’ll find the museum on the left.

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Pat Graven Stays Close to Nature

 

Pat Graven 001

These wave petunias bloomed during the week of Christmas.

Look deep into nature and then you will understand everything better.

~Albert Einstein

Take time to smell the roses. Pat Graven takes time to enjoy the peace and quiet of the countryside and wants her garden to blend in. The area around her home flourishes with plants that are natural to the area. It’s her place to relax as she works with her plants, and leaves the cares of the world behind for a little while at least.

     But Pat didn’t always live in the country. In fact, she was a city girl from the Cleveland area. There, her grandmothers influenced her life at an early age. One grandmother had a passion for roses and would gather rose petals in the morning to make a facial. The other grandmother would only eat things that were grown on the farm. You can see how Pat came to love nature.

Pat played the shopkeeper

This talented lady even played the shopkeeper in “The Magical World of Dickens”.

     Before coming to this area, Pat worked with the police department in Cleveland as a dispatcher. But once she saw the hills and streams of Guernsey and Muskingum counties, she was hooked.

Pat lime tree 001

Her lime tree needs a lot of sunlight.

     Here she quickly learned to enjoy the tranquility of the countryside. Her love for animals makes living here extra special as her yard is filled with deer, wild turkeys, rabbits, squirrels and many, many birds.

     She seems to have a special attraction for birds as when she finds a dead bird along the road, she’ll stop and carefully pick it up with plastic gloves. Then she buries the bird with a plant, to let it continue to have value.

Pat Sphere Collection

Springtime daffodils are surrounded by a few samples of her special sphere collection.

     Over the years, Pat has picked up spheres of various metals and glass, making an outstanding collection..many from around the world. A special one she picked up on one of her trips to Ireland, a land she enjoyed “just because it feels good there”. She also has treasures from her trips to Mexico and Hawaii. But now, she is content to enjoy her home and surroundings.

Pat Paintings

Galway Bay in Ireland on a moonlit night inspired Pat to paint the picture she is holding.

     This very unique lady also has a talent for painting. Pat didn’t even realize she had this ability until she went to a class taught by Sue Dodd, who was an inspiration. Pat said, “I never would have painted if it weren’t for Sue.” Pat also works with Dickens Victorian Village to create heads for their mannequins.

Pat flower garden 001

Flower gardens such as this can be seen all over the hilltop where Pat lives.

     When Pat decided to begin planting flowers around her home, her first thought was to find plants that would attract hummingbirds, butterflies, and bees. When Pat does decide to take a short trip these days, Baker’s Acres – a favorite greenhouse – is her destination.

Pat aloe

Throughout the year, Pat enjoys her rose geranium, citronella and aloe plants.

     In 2006, Pat decided to join the OSU Extension Master Gardener program in Guernsey County. This group of gardeners gives many volunteer hours to the community to make it a more beautiful place to live.

Pat favorite orchid

When Pat grew orchids, this one was her favorite.

     Pat’s goal in joining was “to learn to manage the land properly” since she lives on a farm. Her yard is like none other. In Pat’s eye, “A flower is no more than a weed in disguise.” She loves weeds and has created an unusual and interesting setting by using native plants in a most eye-catching way.

Monarch Butterfly

Pat’s grandson, Joseph, captured this Monarch butterfly having a nectar taste treat.

     Most of what she has learned has been by trial and error. Every year she experiments with a few new plants just to see how they will thrive in our local climate. But you’ll still find many traditional coneflowers, salvia, primrose and lilies surrounding her many artistic garden statues and yard art.

Pat Bathroom Greenhouse

This large bathroom greenhouse is a great place for her jasmine and other plants to thrive.

     Her eyes light up and her face breaks into a smile as she tells you about her latest projects. Just recently her jasmine plant has blossomed for the second time this year. According to Pat, “My whole house smells heavenly.”

Pat Master Gardener

In 2017, Pat was named Master Gardener of the Year.

     In 2017, Pat was named the Guernsey County Master Gardener of the Year. Working with the elementary school children and young ag students to teach gardening skills gives her real pleasure. Often she even has gardening classes at her home on the hill.

Pat and Garden Club friends sharing their straw bale garden.

Kathleen, Vi and Pat, all Master Gardeners, share information about using straw bales as containers for plants.

     Her easy going manner and cheerful smile open the door to many conversations with friends and even strangers. If Pat happens to be stuck in a long line at the store, she doesn’t complain. Her first thought is, “Who can I strike up a conversation with?” Her words of advice to everyone would be, “Happiness is in your destiny. You need not be in a hurry.”

Pat's flowers 001     Would she consider going back to Cleveland and leave this peaceful countryside? “People are so nice down here, why would I ever go back to the city.” The community certainly hopes she will continue to spread her joy of volunteering in so many ways for many years to come.

Stockport Mill and Inn Gives Scenic View of Muskingum River

A retreat for all reasons – or no reason at all

Stockport Dam

Turbulent waters recently flowed past the Stockport Mill and Inn along the Muskingum River.

Escape crowds and noise. Listen to the sounds of the flowing river. Enjoy a delicious meal. All of these become part of the experience when visiting Stockport Mill and Inn on the Dam at the edge of Stockport, Ohio. Explore the history of the area while you “mill around”.

Stockport Locke

This hand-operated lock sets across the Muskingum River from the inn.

     Stockport Mill, located at the sixth in a series of locks and dams on the Muskingum River, had its beginning in 1842. The building today is the third mill on that site. It was built in 1906 by the Dover Brothers. By using a pair of 10-inch Leffel turbines, it not only provided power to run the mill but generated electricity for the town of  Stockport.

Stockport Mill Sign

This old mill sign hangs on the porch of the Stockport Inn on the Dam.

     Stockport Milling Company was known for making Gold Bond, Seal of Ohio and Pride of the Valley refined flours. Products were shipped on steam packet boats and on the Ohio & Little Kanawha Railroad, because good roads were not available at that time.

Stockport Corn Grinder

Some antique equipment, like the corn separator, can be found throughout the inn.

     That early mill supplied many different needs. Farmers could get feed and supplies for their animals, including halters and show supplies. Wives used the mill to purchase their garden seeds and plants. Even the children found a place to pick up a 4-H project in the form of baby chicks.

Stockport Slate in Entrance

Slate from the roof has been recycled into wall covering at the inn’s entrance.

     This was also the place where farmers met to share their news, until it ceased operation as a feed mill in 1997.  Three years later this beautiful old mill was restored and now functions as Stockport Mill Inn and Restaurant on the Dam. It is the only mill still remaining of many that dotted the busy river in the past.

     The owner, Dottie Singer, has attempted to preserve the original architecture and building materials. Inside you’ll find many unusual antiques, information about the history of the area, and great pictures and paintings throughout donated by local Morgan County residents.

Stockport Suite

Hudson Suite offers a view of the river and a jacuzzi for relaxation.

     There are fourteen guest rooms with private balconies, which all have scenic views of the Muskingum River. You might choose to stay in the Morgan Raider Suite, Valley Gem River View, or Captain Hook Suite.

Stockport Lounge

This meeting room contained workings of the mill as well as a place to visit.

     Suites come with a jacuzzi, while other rooms still have that old fashioned claw bath tub. Each of the four floors has a meeting room for relaxation as well as early morning taste treats. This is a great place for a reunion, wedding, business meeting, or just to get away.

Stockport Dining Room

Enjoy weekend meals at Stockport Restaurant on the Dam.

     Their dining area has a wrap around terrace so you can have a delicious meal while watching the river drift by. The restaurant is open weekends throughout most of the year, but closed in January. Friday and Saturday, their hours are 5PM-9 PM, while on Sunday, their delicious buffet, which brings memories of Sunday dinners on the farm, runs from noon-4PM.  Reservations are recommended.

Stockport Turbine

This was one of the original turbines that provided electricity to the mill and town of Stockport.

     While those early turbines that produced electricity for the town became corroded, new turbines have been installed that are similar Samson Leffel turbines. The only difference is these new ones have stainless steel parts instead of the early carbon steel, which rusted.

Stockport Tunnel

This is the exit tunnel for the water after it has run through the turbines.

     Water enters the turbines through a trash-rack, which keeps logs from interfering with turbine action. Then it goes in a tunnel under the mill, where it hits a runner, which turns and makes the power.

Stockport Wall 2

Guests are encouraged to visit the “Signing Wall” along the steps on their way to see the turbines in the basement area.

     The generator sets on top of the Speed Increaser at a level above the 100-year flood level. This Hydro Project produces around 800,000 kilowatt hours per year, using seventeen million gallons of water each day. After all their electric needs are met at the mill, any excess electricity is sold to the electric company. It’s no surprise that today this system is run by a computer!

Stockport Balcony

There’s always an exciting view of the Muskingum River from the balconies.

     For those who like to stay away from it all, Stockport Inn and Mill Restaurant on the Dam would be the perfect place. Guests often come back for the river view from their balcony, great food, and the rustic décor. Many have a favorite suite they use time after time.

Stockport Summer

In the summer, the river here is peaceful near Stockport, Ohio.

     Relax as you hear the sound of the river bubbling right past your balcony at this historic structure. Look for it on your next trip down the Muskingum River.

Stockport Mill and Inn on the Dam is located just off Route 60 along the Muskingum River about halfway between Zanesville and Marietta. Cross over the river at Ohio 266 W and the mill will be on the left hand side. Their address is 1995 Broadway Avenue, Stockport, Ohio.

 

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