Places to go and things to see by Gypsy Bev

Archive for September, 2015

Charm of Small Flower Gardens

Welcome to the garden!

Welcome to the garden!

Not every garden has to be large to enjoy its beauty. In a southwestern corner of Ohio, this friend’s garden bloomed vigorously during a recent visit. An old friend, Bess Siegfried, had moved from Cambridge to the Dayton area on a farm owned by Jill Kesler. The open fields there provide great viewing of sunrise, sunset, and the evening stars. Bess enjoys sitting on the porch enjoying nature – and her flowers of course.

Ever since she was a young girl, Bess found her life surrounded with flowers. Both of her grandmothers were gardeners – vegetables and flowers. One grandmother planted flowers around the edge of her garden to ward off unwanted snackers. But whenever Bess visited them, she helped and learned about gardening.

Once in her teens, she chose flower gardening as her main passion and has continued that ever since no matter where she has lived. Inside and out, plants are evident and cared for with a special touch. Part of her success, it seems, comes from the fact that Bess is also an excellent artist so has an eye for making things look beautiful.

Sunflower stepping stones invite exploration.

Sunflower stepping stones invite exploration.

An interesting rock garden with freshly painted sunflower stepping stones was created over the years through the help of Jill’s father, who found these rocks as he plowed the fields on their farm. Her favorite turtle figures appear to add a little character to the garden.

Beautiful flowers surround this bird bath.

Beautiful flowers surround this bird bath.

This summer was one of early heavy rain so plants got a great start. Then things turned dry, and Bess had her hands full watering all the flowers. Even though the flowers slowed down their blooming, the weeds kept growing fine. Her advice: Be very disciplined in the care of your flower garden, if you want it to be a success.

A Chinese Garden captures the eye.

A Chinese Garden captures the eye.

Originally, this area had just the one tall schrub, which seemed to have a Chinese flavor. So Bess decided to get some white gravel and then added some Chinese Buddhas, Oriental figures and a small pagoda along with a few small plants.

The storage shed highlights various native American creations.

The storage shed highlights various native American creations.

This collection of Sun and Moon faces on the side of a storage shed were found by Jill in her travels – some from Zanesville Pottery. Their circular shape symbolizes the never ending circle of life. Another rock garden grows here as new pieces are spotted along the way…with flowers and plants added by Bess.

A modern

A modern “she-shed” provides a perfect escape.

Males have always escaped to their “man caves”, while women usually headed to the kitchen. Today the female population has come up with a new idea…a “she-shed”. Here they can relax from the cares of the home and the world, in a comfy chair surrounded by treasures that make them happy. No television sets or phones allowed, just a good book or a craft project permitted.

Debbie Garrett, violinist for Springfield Symphony Orchestra, provided entertainment.

Barbie Garrett, violinist for Springfield Symphony Orchestra, provided entertainment.

Barbie’s violin held special memories as it belonged to a friend of the family, Jill’s father, a music teacher and violinist. Even though she had a violin of her own, she never used it again after this precious, old treasure came into her possession. Her music was a real pleasure to end an enjoyable afternoon.

“Bloom where you are planted” applies to flowers and people. Finding a blossom in an unexpected place always brings a smile to my face. Finding a talented person in an unexpected place brings a smile to my face and joy to my heart. May you bloom wherever you happen to be in your life.

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Goodbye Summer! Hello Fall!

This giant ear of corn welcomes you to McDonald's Corn Maze.

This giant ear of corn welcomes you to McDonald’s Corn Maze.

Pumpkins + Corn Maze = Thoughts of Fall

McDonald’s Corn Maze provides the perfect spot for families to discover the spirit of the fall season. In 2006, the corn maze was created with hopes that a few children might be able to enjoy it. Never did they expect that over 3,000 would make their way through the maze that very first year.

The theme each year differs. This year the five-acre corn maze features a cowboy with a lasso standing by a saguaro. Wonder if he’s going to lasso a pumpkin?

A play area along side the corn maze offers many possibilities to explore.

A play area along side the corn maze offers many possibilities to explore.

This is indeed a family affair involving three generations. Jim and Susan McDonald built their home between their parents’ farms on Adamsville Road in Muskingum County. This makes for close family ties and grandparents have opportunity to watch their two grandsons grow up.

Agriculture is their main interest and they want to teach youngsters and adults more about the process of getting food from the farm to the table. Jim lived on a farm all of his life so it was no surprise when he graduated from Ohio State University at their Agricultural Technical Institute with a degree in greenhouse and management production. He opened his first greenhouse the year after he graduated.

All kinds of pumpkins are waiting to be taken home for decorations.

All kinds of pumpkins are waiting to be taken home for decorations. Those in the front are called “Witches Warts”.

There’s no shortage of pumpkins here as McDonald’s has fifteen acres of pumpkins with choices of different sizes, shapes, and colors. Choose from Buckskin, White Pumpkins, or Witches Warts to name a few. They expect to have over 10,000 pumpkins this year as well as a large supply of mums, gourds, and cornstalks. Everything you need for a fantastic fall scene.

Pictures is an overview of the 2015 maze.

Pictured is an overview of the 2015 maze.

They cut the maze in June when the corn was about a foot high. The drawing of the maze scene was placed on a grid, then Susan carefully directed Jim on his mower foot by foot to make it perfect. That’s no small feat in a five acre maze.

Educating students and adults about honey bees is one of Jim's enjoyments.

Educating students and adults about honey bees is one of Jim’s enjoyments.

Affectionately called Old McDonald, Jim has farming in his blood. School groups, 4-H clubs, scout troops and even seniors enjoy his stories about the farm. As you would expect, it’s not unusual for a verse or two of “Old MacDonald Had a Farm” to be part of the day’s events.

Maggie the Milk Cow even goes to the county fair for demonstrations on how to milk a cow.

Maggie the Milk Cow goes to the county fair for demonstrations on how to milk a cow.

Today’s children don’t have much opportunity for up-close contact with real farm life. Jim wants them to understand where their food comes from. His enthusiasm about farm life is almost tangible. Even though it’s hard work, it obviously has its rewards as he enjoys telling children about pollination by honey bees, milking a cow, growing pumpkins and why it’s always earth day for a farmer.

This goat stands on top of a large bale of round ray and peers into the plastic pipe used as a slide. Should he or shouldn't he?

This goat stands on top of a large round bale of hay and peers into the plastic pipe used as a slide. Should he or shouldn’t he?

A petting zoo gives everyone a chance to be in contact with different baby animals such as a lamb, goat, duck, pig, or rabbit. Nearby a small playground contains a unique “sandbox” – a round watering tank filled with fifty bushels of shelled corn. There’s also stones to play hopscotch, and a slide made of plastic pipe atop bales of hay.

Take a walk in the Enchanted Forest and discover how early farmers lived.

Take a walk in the Enchanted Forest and discover how Ohio’s first farmers lived.

Then take a leisurely walk through Enchanted Forest and surround yourself with nature. Listen for the special sounds of the woods and learn about the plants that grow there as many have markers with names and uses. Deep in the woods is a teepee, home of Ohio’s first farmers.

McDonald's Greenhouse also has a large assortment of mums to brighten your fall.

McDonald’s Greenhouse also has a large assortment of mums to brighten your fall.

Sometime during your visit, be sure and climb on the hay wagon for a ride through the beautiful countryside filled with autumn leaves. Sit on bales of hay while the tractor pulls you down a path to see the fall season in beautiful Ohio. There’s a small admission price of only $6 per person for the day, but unlimited fun as it includes all activities.

A visit here adds up to a perfect fall experience filled with learning and fun…no ghosts or witches allowed, except for Witches Wart Pumpkins.

McDonald’s Corn Maze is located east of Zanesville, Ohio off I-70. Take Exit 157 (State Route 93) north to 3220 Adamsville Road. It’s only about two and a half miles from the interstate.

Cambridge Glass Collectors Show “Ebony and Ivory

Gold embossed Ebony

Gold embossed Ebony with Ivory above

“Ebony & Ivory” served as the theme for the National Cambridge Collectors Club Convention in 2015.  Each year, collectors of Cambridge Glass meet to display and sometimes sell, parts of their collections. People come great distances to participate in this event. California, Florida, South Carolina, and Minnesota were a few of the places mentioned as vendors were visited throughout the displays.

Les Hanson presented the opening night program of

Les Hanson presented the opening night program of “Ebony & Ivory”.

From St. Paul, Minnesota, Les Hanson discussed his favorite Cambridge Glass item – swans. Les has a collection of over 125 swans of all sizes, styles and color combinations. They seemed to be his pride and joy. But he also collected, in order of preference, hand painted enamel on crystal, ebony, and decorated nude stems.

When asked how he got interested in Cambridge Glass, Les smiled as he thought back. For some reason, he always liked the beauty of swans. When at a glass show with a friend many years ago, they saw a beautiful green Cambridge Glass swan, which wasn’t very high priced. His friend bought him the swan for a birthday present. Turns out the reason it wasn’t high priced was because it was chipped. Les learned two lessons that day: 1) he was hooked on Cambridge Glass, and 2) chipped glass takes values down rapidly.

Sneaking in one of my favorites from the show - Cranberry Opalescent Coin Dot.

Sneaking in one of my favorites from the show – Cranberry Opalescent Coin Dot.  This show provides a great variety of collections from various glass manufacturers. This collection happens to be Fenton.

One gentleman. whose name eludes me, had an extensive collection of cream and sugar sets. Someone from Cambridge contacted him about attending the glass show years ago and he has been there ever since. At his peak, he had 480 cream and sugar sets. He was formerly a helicopter pilot for the Air Force and the helicopter he flew is now being restored in the Fort Worth Vintage Flying Museum. He said that this show has, “the best Cambridge glass for sale anyplace in the United States.” If anyone knows his name, please let me know.

Autley and Kathy Newton were the new kids on the block at this year's show.

Autley and Kathy Newton were the new kids on the block at this year’s show.

From Hammond, California, Autley and Kathy Newton displayed for the first year ever. They were the newbies at the show and had not only Cambridge Glass but treasured pieces of other glass lines as well as some beautiful pottery pieces. They said that Rick Jones had seen their display at another show and invited them to Cambridge.

Lynn Welker, Mr Cambridge, displayed part of his cordial collection.

Lynn Welker, Mr Cambridge, displayed part of his cordial collection.

Of course, no show of Cambridge Glass would be complete without the presence of Mr. Cambridge, Lynn Welker, from nearby New Concord. Lynn has an extensive collection of over 11,000 pieces of Cambridge Glass. Cordials are his favorite because they are small and easy to move around, yet delicate and beautiful.

Lynn has been interested in glass all his life as his mother had an antique shop in New Concord and Lynn spent many hours at the store. He bought a glass bottle at an auction at the age of nine and has been hooked ever since. For sixty-one years, his vacations and adventures involve trade shows and museums. No wonder he is called Mr. Cambridge.

Doug shares his top quality glassware, but friendships are what keep him coming back.

Doug shares his top quality glassware, but friendships are what keep him coming back.

From Minnesota, Doug Ingraham, who has been collecting for forty-two years, is said to have “the best of the best”. This all began when his grandmother left him a collection of Cambridge Glass. Someplace he met Elizabeth Moe and she told him, “If you want to know about Cambridge Glass, join the collectors.”

Doug said that while the glass is beautiful, “What keeps me coming back are the friendships.”

Auman Museum of Radio and TV – Sights and Sounds of Years Gone By

   

Auman's Museum of Radio & TV still has an antenna on its roof.

Auman Museum of Radio & TV still has a working antenna on its roof.

Television won’t be able to hold on to any market after six weeks. People will soon get tired of staring at a plywood box every night.      

~Darryl Zamuck, head of 20th Century Fox, 1946

Who had the first TV in your neighborhood? Step inside a door marked Auman Museum of Radio & TV  in Dover, Ohio to discover television sets from days of old, and you just might see a TV like that one in your neighbor’s house long ago.

Larry Auman, owner, has accomplished what he set out to do after 50 years of collecting. His interest began way back in 1948 when he first saw a working TV in the window of Western Auto, while walking down the street with his mom and dad on a Saturday night.

He takes great pride in his display and the joy it brings to visitors. “My museum gives people a chance to experience sights and sounds of years gone by.”

Owner, Larry, points out the first TV his family had back in 1951.

Owner, Larry, points out a 10″ GE television, the first set his family had back in 1951.

After graduating from DeVry, Larry opened Auman’s TV & Electronic Service at his home near Dover. At some point, television sets brought in for repair began to accumulate,and soon he had a room full of sets that showed a history of their development.

In 2001, Larry moved his radio and television collection from a room above his garage to the former Iron Valley Bank building in downtown Dover. What was formerly filled with cash, now has priceless memorabilia on display from 1900-1950. The museum contains nearly 150 early TV sets from 60 different companies – none of which are in existence today, Zenith being the last to go.

This early home entertainment center from 1948 contained a TV, record player, and radio.

This home entertainment center from 1948 contained a TV, record player, and radio.

Viewing the old radios, memories might pop into your mind of listening to “Fibber McGee and Molly”, “Amos and Andy”, or “The Life of Riley”. Since Larry attempts to keep all the sets in working order, you might enjoy watching an early television rendition of those old favorites. Some people spend most of their visit going back in time as they watch old shows and commercials.

During those early days of television, viewing time was very limited. There were no programs at all on Thursday or Sunday, and the rest of the week, hours were from 4:00 pm – 8:00 pm. How times have changed!

This played the NBC sign-on tones. The fourth bar was only used during WWII.

This played the NBC sign-on tones. The fourth bar was only used during WWII.

Over the last 50 years, Larry collected hundreds of varied items that relate to early days of television and the shows it brought to life. Game boards, toys, posters, comic books and much, much more can be found in his one-room showplace.

Auman Museum has received great publicity since the 70s when Larry appeared on TV as a segment of PM Magazine out of Cleveland. Numerous magazine and newspaper articles have been written about his collection, and he has been filmed numerous times for television specials. Often the sets he has collected appear in special programs also.

This handcranked silent movie projector contained a surprise when purchased - a film of Bing Crosby's

This hand-cranked silent movie projector contained a surprise when purchased – a film of Bing Crosby’s “Going My Way”.

If you listened to the radio or watched TV growing up, you will really enjoy this museum. Actually, almost everyone, even youngsters, find it fascinating. Larry tells many captivating stories about the equipment he has found and the unusual ways things have come into his possession.

Larry shows how easily this premier radio operated from either side.

With a view of a portion of the museum in the background, Larry sits next to a Zenith Chairside Radio.

Hours for the museum are extremely flexible but only opened by request. Call Larry at (330) 364-1058 and he can usually accommodate a visit with a little notice.Television has come a long, long way, but people have never tired of staring at the TV screen.

Auman Museum is located at 215 North Tuscarawas Avenue in Dover, Ohio along Route 211. Off I-77 take exit 81 and turn on Ohio 39 E. Go straight onto W. 3rd Street about .6 mile, then turn right onto Tuscarawas Ave.

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