Places to go and things to see by Gypsy Bev

Archive for April, 2017

National Road – Zane Grey Museum

Zane Grey Museum

The Zane Grey Museum was originally constructed to resemble a frontier fort.

Three pieces of history are superbly woven together at the National Road – Zane Grey Museum between New Concord and Zanesville, Ohio along old Route 40. Learn about the road to the West, famous author Zane Grey, and Zanesville potteries.

Way back in 1811, Ebenezer Zane discussed with George Washington the need for a road across the newly settled country. Washington agreed it was vital to the future of the country so proclaimed, “Open a wide door, and make a smooth Way.” That began Zane’s Trace, which became part of the National Road.

Zane Grey Crossing

Diorama sections show their difficult work in constructing The National Road over streams.

The museum presents a detailed 136′ diorama depicting life on the original National Road, often called “The Main Street of America”. All the figures are hand made from clay and accurate down to the tiniest detail.  The first road was dirt, followed by the Corduroy Road made of logs, making it very rough. Eventually a stone foundation was in place with crushed stone on the top, and finally bricks

Zane Grey Ferries

Ferries took wagons and supplies across the Ohio River.

Every mile a stone mile marker gave travelers information on mileage to various towns along the way. A Gunter Chain, 66′ long, was used to measure the distance of one mile time and time again. If you moved the 66′ chain X 80 times = 5,280 ‘, the distance of one mile. The Gunter Chain also measured the distance across the road – 66’.

Zane Grey Diorama

Logs formed the Corduroy Road, a rough stretch to travel.

After WWI, Dwight Eisenhower led a convoy of trucks across the National Road, and during WWII, General Eisenhower discovered the Autobahn in Germany. When he became president he felt it of high importance to develop better highways in America. Thus began our interstate highway system.

Zane Grey Stop

The 10 Mile House provided refreshments along the highway. Baker’s Motel is located on that spot today.

Pearl Zane Grey, being born in Zanesville, traveled this road frequently. His early writing attempts were squelched by his father, who insisted that Zane attend the University of Pittsburgh so he could be a dentist and follow in his father’s footsteps. Zane did graduate with a degree in dentistry after enjoying a time of pitching his great curve ball on the college baseball team, where he enjoyed a full baseball scholarship.

When he married Dolly, her encouragement and editing abilities, along with a nice inheritance, made it possible for Zane to abandon his dental practice and begin following his passions…writing and fishing.

Zane Grey Study

Zane Grey wrote his books by hand in his study, surrounded by native American items he had collected in his travels.

His first book was Betty Zane, the story of a young girl who helped save Fort Henry. But it was Riders of the Purple Sage that put popularity into Grey’s writings. His books sold like hot cakes. Zane wrote all his stories in long hand, then his wife, Dolly, typed them and had them published. Many were turned into movies.

Zane enjoyed fishing more than anything else and spent over 300 days a year at that sport. He split the money from the books with Dolly, and he spent his half on fishing, boats, and travel. When he traveled out West, he filled his tablets with descriptions of the scenes he saw, for use in his stories.

Zane Grey fishing

Big-game fishing was the real passion in his life.

The only books that sold more copies than Grey’s at that time were the Bible and school primers. Hemingway was quite jealous of Grey, not because of his successful writing career, but because of his great fishing ability. Zane’s love of the great out-of-doors can be seen in all of his books through his detailed descriptions. 

Now how does the fantastic collection of pottery fit in? The perfect clay for making pottery could be found in this area quite easily – in dirt roads, such as the National Road, which had clay as their base. Potters would go out to the road and dig up a small portion of clay to make a vase or bowl. This became known as a “potters’ hole”. Thus the term we use today for a hole in the road – “pot hole”.

Zane Grey Pottery

This is a small section of the Zanesville Pottery collection on display.

But the collection goes beyond those humble beginnings and includes the work of over 132 potteries in the Zanesville area. Thousands of workers contributed to this large display, which was originally the collection of Mr. Downey, the owner of Conn’s Potato Chips. Upon his death, half of his pottery was given to the Zane Grey Museum for display, while the other half is in the Zanesville Museum of Art.

Zane Grey Model T

Find surprises along the way like this Model T Ford.

Next time you travel along the Old National Road, today’s Route 40, stop at the National Road – Zane Grey Museum and watch a film about the life of Zane Grey. The knowledgeable guides will lead you down the road to books, movies, pottery…and some surprises along the way.

National Road – Zane Grey Museum is located on old Route 40 about a half mile from I-70, Exit 164, Norwich Exit. The museum is located between New Concord and Zanesville, Ohio.

 

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Take a Country Drive to Explore Coshocton Quilt Barn Trails

 

Garden of Eden

Quilt patterns on the sides of barns gave a purpose for a country drive.

A Sunday drive has always been one of my favorite things. Dad would travel the back roads exploring places we’d never been. That same feeling occurred while wandering along the Coshocton Quilt Barn Trails. It was a peaceful, old-fashioned road trip on those narrow, two-lane country roads, where you could actually take time to look at the scenery.

While Quilt Barns have become a nationwide movement, they got their beginning fairly recently. In 2001, Donna Sue Groves wanted to honor her mother’s passion for quilting, so painted her mother’s favorite quilt square on their old tobacco barn in Adams County.

Ohio Quilt Barns

These counties in Ohio have Quilt Barn Trails.

From there, the Quilt Barns arose to reflect the spirit of the community. In Miami County, quilts were hand-painted on the barn’s surface replicating the look of fabric, while in Harrison County emphasis was on the Underground Railroad.

Coshocton County Heritage Quilt Barns feature family quilt patterns. Each quilt has a story to tell. The Pomerene Center for the Arts is responsible for creating this historic drive to view our nation’s agricultural landscape. They have three possible routes: Tiverton Trail, SR 643 Trail and Progressive Valley Trail.

It is important to either print off a map from the computer, open one on your phone or tablet, or pick one up at Coshocton Visitors’ Bureau in Roscoe Village. Directions are essential.

Mother Setzer's Quilt

Mother Setzer Quilt Barn appeared in a natural rock setting.

Several of the Quilt Barns have online connections to stories about the colorful quilts and who originally designed the quilt squares. Mother Setzer Quilt Barn appeared first on our adventure, and had a lovely setting with a firm foundation of large rocks around the barn. Their grandmother made this quilt pattern from scraps of her clothing and black silk dresses.

While SR 643 became the trail of choice, meandering from that path became frequent. The desire to see more Quilt Barns eventually included parts of all three Coshocton trails.

Sweet Pea

The lane back to Sweet Pea Quilt Barn featured a picturesque white fence.

Many of the Quilt Barns sat on back roads. Some became a challenge, and a four wheel drive vehicle would have been helpful on this rainy day as roads were steep and muddy. But beautiful, scenic farms throughout this Amish countryside made the day enjoyable. Corn shocks were a sight not seen since childhood.

Chalice

A barn near a lovely stone home featured Chalice pattern.

Chalice was the name given to the quilt pattern made by Catherine Stubbs on a barn near a lovely stone house. It appears that Catherine stayed very busy with quilting and life in general. One day when her husband was at work in the coal mines, she moved them to another house closer to his work. It’s said when she cooked Sunday chicken dinner, she could stretch one chicken to feed twelve people.

Butterfly with Raindrops

Butterfly Quilt Barn received raindrops during this trip.

The Butterfly Quilt Barn near Fresno showcases a quilt made and designed by Oneita Hahn. Family members remember her quilting frame being up in the dining room quite often. Quilt patterns frequently were created by the quilters themselves and then drawn on newspaper.

Snowball

In downtown Coshocton, you’ll find Snowball pattern on the side of a former quilt shop.

Not all barns were in the country. One actually was found in downtown Coshocton on the side of an old IOOF building, which formerly housed Mercantile on Main. Snowball, a black and white quilt, decorated the front of this one-time quilt supply shop.

Canal Era Applique

Blacksmith shop in Roscoe Village displays an attractive quilt pattern.

In Roscoe Village on the side of the Blacksmith Shop, Canal Era Applique could be seen upon entering the village on North Whitewoman Street. The quilt square on display appeared on a quilt made by Hannah Hays, whose family arrived in the area by canal boat.

Ohio Rose & Star

Ohio Rose & Star can be found in Clary Garden in Coshocton.

The end of SR 643 Trail came in classy Clary Garden. Ohio Rose & Star has graced the side of their barn since 2003. Made by Coshocton Canal Quilter Helen Moody, this pattern was chosen to hang at the gardens in honor of the family’s rose business.

But this artistic project doesn’t stop here. All over the United States, Quilt Barn Trails have been created. Presently, over 6000 quilt patterns have been placed on barns in 33 Ohio counties, 45 states, and even some in Canada. It’s a wonderful excuse to get in the car and take a road trip.

Tractor Quilt

A clever tractor pattern on one barn added variety to the day.

This country adventure through scenic back roads will take you back to a less stressful time. The Quilt Barns provide a variety of attractive patterns in excellent condition. You can take this drive any time of the year and enjoy this grassroots art movement. Watch for Quilt Barns wherever you travel.

While on the Coshocton Quilt Barn Trails, you’ll find not only creative quilt patterns but Amish farms, meandering streams, beautiful stone houses, and unique shops along the way. Don’t forget your camera!

AMA – Motorcycle Hall of Fame Springtime is the Perfect Time to Get Out and Ride

AMA Museum Sign

This sign along I-70 directs motorcycle enthusiasts to the AMA Hall of Fame.

April’s “ AMA Get Out and Ride! Month” seems the perfect time to visit the AMA Motorcycle Hall of Fame. What stories the bikes tell and history they hold.

AMA, American Motorcycle Association, serves a membership of over 200,000 with an average experience of 28 years. They own 615,000 motorcycles, which are ridden over a billion miles each year.

In 1990, AMA Hall of Fame first opened in Westerville, then moved to its present Pickerington location in 1999. Here it can easily be seen from I-70.

AMA Hall of Fame

The Hall of Fame plaques surround a circular room. You’ll find familiar names there even if you’re not a motorcycle fan.

A special round room holds a plaque for each member inducted into the AMA Motorcycle Hall of Fame. They recognize individuals who have contributed to the motorcycle sport over the years. At the entrance is a Glory Days Statue.

AMA Dirt Bikes

Dirt bikes are especially popular with the younger generation.

The displays at AMA Hall of Fame are arranged in sections according to motorcycle type: Dirt Bike, Road Racing, Motocross, Specialty and Off Road. Each one holds memorabilia from many familiar names, who are fearless, imaginative and awe-inspiring.

AMA Ashley

Ashley, AMA Associate Editor, enjoys motocross. Her favorite motocross racer is Ricky Carmichael, the winningest motocross racer of all times.

Ashley Price, Associate Editorial Director at AMA, gave an excellent overview. She had a passion for motorcycles, having gone to Motocross training daily at the age of 14 while being home schooled.

Her days were carefully monitored regarding food, gym and riding time. She only slipped up once on her food. At Walmart, she purchased a box of Wheat Things. Punishment – another six or seven miles of bike drills.

Those years of competition have given Ashley determination in life situations. “The camaraderie of family and friends has given many memories. I’ve learned life lessons in working hard to accomplish goals.”

AMA Adventure bike 2

Adventure bikes are the most popular today as they can ride in the street and off road.

Riding a bike in racing takes more strength and determination than it appears. It is one of the most difficult sports in the world. At the end of a race, riders are exhausted. It takes a great combination of man and bike to win consistently.

AMA Mechanics

Let’s not forget the mechanics, as their role in a race is crucial.

If you like motorcycles, you’re sure to find something of interest at AMA Hall of Fame, which is packed with motorcycle history. With 117 bikes, there’s a great variety. It’s not possible to describe all of them here, so you’ll have to visit yourself. Most were donated by names familiar in the biking world.

AMA Oldest Bike

Currently, the oldest bike at the museum is this 1914 Harley-Davidson, one of the earliest dirt bike racers.

A 1914 Harley claimed the honor for the oldest bike at the museum. Most popular now are adventure bikes. They can go on the street or easily off road due to their special tires. They’re not for competition, just enjoyment.

AMA Toy Bikes 2

Downstairs at the AMA Hall of Fame, there is a nice selection of motorcycle toys.

Downstairs, Motorcycle Toys and Collections stir up some memories, or watch a biking video. “Why We Ride” played during a recent visit and centered around family fun involved with making great memories. “It’s a most interesting, amazing adventure,” quipped one lady aged 78, heading for 100.

AMA Wooden toy bike

This wooden motorcycle overlooking the patio, gives children a chance to sit on the seat or in the side carrier.

Riders feel this is a great way to make friends. Children join in at an early age on their dirt bikes. Charity work frequently happens with motorcycle groups. Everything from Cancer Runs to Christmas Toy Drives occur around the world.

The AMA sets up a Gypsy Tour series for their members. Its purpose is to have a rally and provide a memorable experience for everyone involved. Motorcycle friends are a close knit family, where men, women and children enjoy the thrill of riding and racing together.

If you are passionate about motorcycles, AMA Motorcycle Hall of Fame would be a great family outing. Then, Get Out and Ride!

The AMA Motorcycle Hall of Fame can be found just off I -70 at Exit 112, Route 256. Take a left of Blacklick Eastern Road and another left on Yarmouth. Watch for their posted signs to 13515 Yarmouth Drive. Enjoy the ride!

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