Places to go and things to see by Gypsy Bev

Archive for the ‘Washington’ Category

“Chihuly: Celebrating Nature” at Franklin Park Conservatory

Chihuly Annie's Pond

“Anemones and Niijima Floats” can be found at Annie’s Koi Pond. Artwork © Chihuly Studio. All Rights Reserved.

I want my work to appear like it came from nature. So that if someone found it on a beach or in the forest, they might think it belonged there.

~Dale Chihuly

Stunning glass artwork by Dale Chihuly is being featured at Franklin Park Conservatory and Botanical Gardens in Columbus. The vibrant colors make this exhibition glow from within.

     Select pieces of Chihuly have been exhibited at Franklin Park since 2003 when they were honored to be the second botanical garden in the world to host an exhibition by Dale Chihuly. This time they are excited to be able to exhibit their full collection and several pieces on loan, the largest Chihuly collection in a botanical garden.

Chihuly Sunset Tower

“Sunset Chandelier” can be seen suspended in the Pacific Island Biome. Artwork © Chihuly Studio. All Rights Reserved.

     These breathtaking pieces can be found in the Conservatory’s botanical gardens and courtyards. Most of his pieces are inspired and named for objects in nature. In the Pacific Island Water Garden, you can find that awesome Sunset Chandelier.

     Chihuly has been interested in glass since childhood walks on the beaches of Puget Sound where he found little pieces of broken bottles and Japanese floats. However, it wasn’t until he was a student at The University of Washington that he decided to weave some small pieces of glass into his tapestries.

Chihuly Lavender Reeds

“Neodymium Reeds & Green Grass” contain a rare lavender hue. Artwork © Chihuly Studio. All Rights Reserved.

     A few years later, he melted some glass in an oven and blew his first glass bubble. At that moment, this artist decided to be a glassblower. Over the years he has experimented with many old and new techniques to create artistic creations beyond the normal bounds of function and beauty.

Chihuly Ceiling

“Persian Ceiling” contains hundreds of layered blown glass forms. Artwork © Chihuly Studio. All Rights Reserved.

     This creator of unusual glass artwork still makes his home in Seattle where he and his wife, Leslie, take art to places that might not normally see it. They have formed the Leslie and Dale Chihuly Foundation which works with veterans, teenagers, and seniors. The foundation also gives grants each year to two Washington state innovative artists.

Chihuly Macchia

“Macchia” series is aglow with an unbelievable combination of colors. Artwork © Chihuly Studio. All Rights Reserved.

     Glass is the most magical of all materials and is one of the few materials that light can pass through easily. Chihuly was attracted by the way even a small glass opening creates a beautiful object. Color doesn’t seem to matter as he said, “I’ve never met a color I didn’t like.”

     Since an auto accident in 1976 where he lost his left eye, Chihuly has not blown glass himself but oversees a team of skilled glassblowers. He likens himself to the director of a movie or an architect overseeing the project these days. But his mark is still left behind on the productions. Traditional glass factories create perfectly formed vessels while Chihuly lets the glass take its own shape, and irregularity is prevalent.

Chihuly Paintbrushes (2)

“Paintbrushes” is named for the Indian Paintbrush flower.  Artwork © Chihuly Studio. All Rights Reserved.

     Because of interest in glasshouses, his exhibitions have found their way into many botanical garden settings around the world. This outstanding blown glass has been seen from Venice to Jerusalem and Montreal.

     From 1994 to 1996, the artist worked with glassblowers in Finland, Ireland, Mexico, and Italy to create “Chihuly Over Venice” – a series of fifteen Chandeliers which he hung over canals and in piazzas of Venice, one of his favorite cities.

Chihuly Venetian

“Venetian Vase” is overwhelmed by sprouting flowers. Artwork © Chihuly Studio. All Rights Reserved.

     Four years later, his largest public exhibition, “Chihuly in the Light of Jerusalem, 2000” was viewed by over a million visitors at the Tower of David Museum. His creations can be found in over two hundred museums around the world.

     Like many artists, when asked about plans for the future, his response is, “If I knew what was to be created next, I would already have done it.”

Chihuly Blue Garden Fiori

“Blue Garden Fiori” was inspired by his mother’s flower garden. Artwork © Chihuly Studio. All Rights Reserved.

     He does encourage young artists to surround themselves with artists and see as much art as possible. “Create something that nobody has ever seen before.” That’s something that Chihuly has become an expert at doing.

     The full Chihuly: Celebrating Nature will be at Franklin Park Conservatory until March 29. Don’t miss this chance to see beautiful and unique glass creations that are sure to please and surprise you.

     “I want people to be overwhelmed with light and color in some way that they’ve never experienced.” ~Chihuly

Franklin Park Conservatory is in Columbus, Ohio at 1777 E. Broad Street. They have exciting things happening all year long. Pictures in this post were taken by Gypsy Bev and were then approved for publication by Dale Chihuly.

Will Mount St Helens Erupt Again?

Earthquakes! Steam explosions! Molten lava!  All of these were present during the 1980 awakening and subsequent eruption of Mount St Helens in Washington. Today this area, home of the largest volcanic landslide in recorded history, is designated as Mount St Helens National Volcanic Monument as a place for research, recreation and education.

Johnston Ridge Observatory, just one of the visitors’ centers, was a great place to start exploring. Their theater showed great footage of the 1980 eruption. Here you also found first hand accounts of individuals who were actually in the vicinity that day. Of particular interest were the machines that recorded the seismic activity presently occurring.

There were several trails leading up the side of Mount St Helens, which appeared mostly barren being covered with ashes. You could walk among the fallen trees that were flattened by the blast. If you felt braver and went a little farther, you could even see vehicles and heavy logging equipment that was damaged when Mount St Helens blew her top. Took the path as far as was permitted at that time. The hiking trails stay open according to the mood of the volcano.  When she is steaming or spewing forth lava, they obviously need to be closed. But what a thrill to get as close as possible to the top of Mount St Helens.

The 1980 eruption left behind a trail that is still visible today. Due to the force of rocks and ice, trees in the lava path were struck down like bowling pins.  Today they still lay there on the ground but the forestry department has gradually handplanted new seedlings amongst the fallen trees.

From 1986 – 2004, the mountain slumbered until in 2004 earthquakes rippled through the earth. Later that year a smaller eruption began and about a dump truck load of lava oozed out of Mount St Helens every second thus slowly rebuilding the mountain.  By 2011 the amount of lava oozing from the mountain was reduced to a dump truck load every fifteen seconds.  If the eruptions would continue at their present rate, the mountain would be back to its original height in about 180 years.

During the 1980 blast, everything within miles was covered with ash from the volcano.  So suppose it was easy for the ash to be gathered and sold as souvenirs.  Still have a pen said to contain ash from that volcanic eruption.The entire landscape has changed from that 1980 blast. New river routes have been formed and even new lakes. Here you see a real change of scenery due to the awesome power of nature.  Will a major eruption happen again? Probably not in our life time, as most volcanoes erupt every 100-300 years.  The future holds hope for reforestation and rebuilding…unless another eruption occurs sooner than expected.

Hope your life will erupt with much happiness, and may you spread that happiness for miles around.

Mount St Helens National Volcanic Monument is located in Washington approximately 96 miles south of Seattle, Washington and 50 miles northeast of Portland, Oregon. One easy access route is from I-5, Exit 68 onto the Spirit Lake Memorial Highway/ WA 504. This route passes through the various visitors’ centers and into the center of the original blast zone.  

Tag Cloud