Places to go and things to see by Gypsy Bev

Posts tagged ‘Salt Fork Festival’

The Cambridge Singers Have a Song in Their Heart

Cambridge Singers 2017

The present Cambridge Singers often dress eloquently for their performances.

Music makes the world a happier place. If you enjoy singing around the house or while driving your car, perhaps you’d like to join The Cambridge Singers, either singing as a member or listening in the audience.

Kathy Turner, Cambridge Singers director

Kathy Antill, the director, brings experience and new energy to the group.

   The unique sound created by The Cambridge Singers sets them apart from traditional groups. This wonderful group of singers is the oldest continually operating six-part harmony chorus in the state. Recently Kathryn Antill took over the helm of directing this elite group.  Tom Apel accompanies them on the piano.

Singers Fred Waring Award 001 (2)

This 1955 Waring Award was the beginning of “The Cambridge Singers”.

   It all began with a group called “Musigals”, a group of married women who loved to sing. Then in 1965, they decided to add some men to the chorus for a special show. It was suggested that they enter the Fred Waring Sacred Heart Program Choral Competition by sending in a tape for critique.

Singers Fred Waring Trophy 001 (2)

The Fred Waring trophy still brings a feeling of pride and accomplishment.

   They won first prize and a beautiful trophy in the mixed ensemble category over a field of entries from all over the United States and Canada. Their award-winning rendition of “O Sacred Heart” was heard on 875 television and radio stations.

   With that kind of success, they drew up a charter for the group, and officially became “The Cambridge Singers” in November, 1965 under the direction of Donna Shafer Blackwood. Their first concert under that name occurred at Easter of 1966 in The First Presbyterian Church.

Singers Salt Fork Lodge 001 (2)

Sometimes the chorus harmonizes outside Salt Fork Lodge

   This chorus has sung every kind of music and entertained audiences around the state. Their performances have included: AmeriFlora, the Columbus Symphony Orchestra, Miss Clayland Pageant, and Barnesville Pumpkin Show.

Singers Carnegie Hall 001 (2)

The chorus had a happy time at Carnegie Hall.

  In 1991, The Cambridge Singers performed at Carnegie Hall during their 100th-anniversary celebration accompanied by the Manhattan Philharmonic. This talented group is proud to have been invited back, and hope to make a repeat trip in the near future.

   In the lifetime of the chorus, there have been over 130 community members who have participated with eight different directors and three accompanists. They practice each Tuesday at First Presbyterian Church. 

Marge Stover

Marge Stover, back center, has been with the group from its beginning.

   One member, Marge Stover, happens to be the only charter member of the group still performing. She shares with her family a great musical background and was pleased when asked to join the group. Marge not only has a beautiful voice but has helped with every aspect of the singers at one time or another from costumes to set design.

Singers Mayor's Award 001 (2)

The late Mayor Sam Salupo presents former Director Jim Whitehair with the Mayor’s Award about ten years ago.

   Costumes are of great importance and they are pleased that the Kiwanis Foundation and Rotary Club have given them grants, which they used for costumes. The Rotary Club has also given a grant for music in honor of the late Dr. Quentin Knauer, who sang in the chorus for fifty years. The chorus sincerely appreciates all the support they receive from the community.

Singers Go Patriotic 001 (2)

The Cambridge Singers added some choreography to this patriotic tune.

   Each year, The Cambridge Singers have a spring show and one at Christmas, both of them being at the Scottish Rite Auditorium in downtown Cambridge. The chorus has performed at nearly every Salt Fork Festival and their Christmas appearance at the Guernsey County Senior Center plays to a standing room only crowd.

The Cambridge Singers

The Cambridge Singers performed at the 48th Salt Fork Festival.

   While memorable performances are their main goal, members feel the group is an extended family, who gives them support during troubled times. When attending the Tuesday rehearsals, all troubles disappear for two hours as they harmonize in song. Music heals the mind, body and soul.

Singers Children 001 (2)

Children of chorus members take part in the annual Christmas program.

   This group has a special interest in encouraging young people to become involved in the world of music. Each year they present several scholarships to area youth. The prestigious Rigel Award is given in memory of Everett “Red” and Mary Ann Rigel, both long-time members of Cambridge Singers. This honors a community member who promotes and advocates music, music education and the importance of the arts in all walks of life.

   If you have an interest in joining The Cambridge Singers or have other questions about the group, contact any member or call Janet Teichman at 740-638-2220 or Gayle Roberts at 740-680-1723. They will welcome you with open arms and a song in their heart.

   The Cambridge Singers’ wish is to promote music and the musical quality of life in our community. Most of all, they love music.

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Laura Bates – A Lifetime of Community Involvement

Behind every success is effort.

Behind every effort is passion.

Behind every passion is someone with the courage to try.

Laura Salt Fork picture

Laura was a member of the Salt Fork Festival board and treasures this painting of her old family church in Noble County painted by a festival artist, Jim Secrest.

   Courage to promote local attractions is something Laura Bates still has a passion for after many years of community involvement. There’s no way to describe all her contributions in one short article, but here are a few highlights.

Laura and brothers

Brothers Eugene and Robert Williams sat with Laura on their farmhouse steps.

   Although Laura isn’t likely to tell her age, she will say that she was born on the day they repealed prohibition. Laura Williams grew up in the New Concord area and graduated from New Concord High School.

Laura and Andy 50th 001

Andy and Laura celebrated their 50th wedding anniversary in 2012.

   While in high school, Laura worked part-time at Ohio Valley Dairy, where she met her husband, Andy Bates. Although she went to Columbus and worked for a couple years, it didn’t take her long to return to New Concord, get married and raise a family of three sons.

   While raising her family, Laura worked part-time at WILE writing continuity, scripts for advertising, and was the first woman to have a weekly community show from New Concord, Byesville and Caldwell.

   One interesting project at the radio station involved Betty Crocker coupons, which gave great rewards. The station collected 700,000 coupons with which they were given a dialysis machine. It was donated to Riverside Hospital in Columbus, their first dialysis machine ever, in memory of Betty Lou Showman, a Bloomfield lady who had needed a kidney transplant.

Laura Tomahawk

Laura helped with the Bicentennial of Guernsey County when Boyd Glass created a commemorative tomahawk.

   For nearly ten years, Laura worked with the Salt Fork Arts & Crafts Festival. She served on their board, wrote publicity for the festival and was in charge of the Performing Arts. She served as president of the board at a time when there were 225 exhibitors.

  Church has always been an important part of her life. Bloomfield United Presbyterian Church considers itself fortunate to have Laura as an active member there. As a cancer survivor, Laura feels she is indeed blessed, “There are no crumbs at God’s table. He uses everything.” She feels God has a use for each of us.

Laura Daffodil Luncheon model 001

Modeling at the Daffodil Luncheon was pure enjoyment for Laura.

   Working with local Channel 2 TV, Laura was host of a popular “Two About Town” show – every day for fifteen years. Here she talked to many local organizations about their promotions and activities. She was a natural as everyone knows that Laura enjoys talking, but more importantly, she’s a great listener.

Laura on stage

Laura organized the Hopalong Cassidy Festival and usually emceed the event.

   The most recent avenue for involvement has been with Hopalong Cassidy. Laura worked at the local radio/television station and was conducting an interview with a lady, who remarked, “I can’t believe your town hasn’t done something special with your Hopalong Cassidy heritage.”

Laura tries on Hoppy's boots 001

Visiting Boyd’s home in California, Laura tried on Hoppy’s boots.

   Bill Boyd, later known as Hopalong Cassidy, was born in 1895 at Hendrysburg and later moved to Cambridge, where he attended Park School and Second United Presbyterian Church. His dream even then was to be a cowboy in the movies. Before long, Bill left for Hollywood, and the rest is history.

   After the interview, Laura thought about this, and realized there were many people still interested in Hopalong Cassidy. That’s when she came up with the idea for a Hopalong Cassidy Festival, which was held each May for 47 years.

Laura and Grace 001

Laura and Grace Boyd, Hoppy’s wife, became good friends.

   Not only did Laura direct the Festival, but she began her own collection of Hopalong Cassidy memorabilia and had the recent Hopalong Cassidy Museum in Cambridge. Grace Boyd, Hoppy’s wife, became one of Laura’s closest friends.

Laura and Don McLean 001

Dan McLean, singer-songwriter, wrote the introduction to “Hopalong Cassidy an American Legend”. Laura attended one of his concerts to give him a Hoppy watch.

   In 1984, Laura was named the Jeffersonian Person of the Year and later given the Sidlo Award by the Cambridge Chamber of Commerce. These were given because of her excellence in vision, leadership and legacy to promote the community.

Hoppy with Laura and Alan

This Hopalong Cassidy statue was dedicated at the Senior Center with Laura and Alan Cottrill, sculptor, present.

   When the festival came to an end, Laura still wanted Hopalong to be remembered in the area, so she began a drive to raise funds for a bronze statue of Hopalong Cassidy to be created by Alan Cottrill, an international sculptor. Today that statue can be found at our Senior Center.

   No wonder Hopalong Cassidy’s faithful buckaroos say, “Laura is the best friend Hoppy ever had.” Hoppy fans all over the world know this lady and keep a strong connection by visits, cards and gifts.

   Traveling is something she has enjoyed throughout her life with trips to Scotland, England, Ireland, Mexico and nearly all the states. Andy and Laura even renewed their wedding vows on a cruise in the Caribbean. A short trip she’d still like to take is one to see the Ark Encounter in Kentucky.

Laura Hopalong Cassidy Book

Laura treasures this Hopalong Cassidy book with its unique cover. Someday she plans to finish her own book about the cowboy legend, Hopalong Cassidy.

   Laura mentioned a couple of other things she’d like to do. Jokingly, she says she’d like to have her house cleaned up, but she has so many other things to do that are more enjoyable. Most important, she has started a book about Hopalong Cassidy and his local connection and plans to spend more time getting it organized.

Laura Family

Family is most important to Laura with three sons, five grandchildren and three great-grandchildren.

   Most important of all is Family. Her feelings for her family were expressed by saying, “My family moments are more important to me than anything I have ever done. Our 50th wedding anniversary when everyone was here was a very special day.”

   While Laura lives life to the fullest and continues to promote her community, now we’ll have to keep on the lookout for Laura’s book about Hoppy. In the meantime, have a Hoppy Day!

Painters Hollow Overflows with Creativity

Jorgensen Greenhouse

Since they raise most of their own food, their greenhouse was the first thing Maggi and Gene wished to discuss.

Teamwork best describes the lifestyle of Gene and Maggi Jorgensen, the artistic couple from Painters Hollow near Salt Fork State Park. Working together, they have accomplished more than the average couple because they love what they do. “If we can’t have fun, we’re not going to do it.”

Farming runs in Gene’s blood as his dad farmed in New York and white-washed barns to help with expenses. For many years Gene worked as a sheet metal worker, which led him on varied adventures all over the United States and beyond. Once he even climbed a mountain in Peru.

Jorgensen Maggi

Maggi wears the first necklace Gene made using five quarters and trimmed in brass.

Maggi worked in the engineering department at NCR until its closing. Not wanting to transfer, she trained to become an RN. We’ll talk more about those necklaces she wore to work later.

Stopping by on a warm spring day, the first thing they’re eager to talk about is their garden, “We live out of our garden.” They even pick fresh lettuce from their basement all winter long.

Jorgensen Bales

Certain crops, like tomatoes and eggplant, grow best for them in bales of straw. The red ball rests on a decorative iron holder made by Gene.

Their small greenhouse provides the perfect place to start plants for transfer to their garden and straw bales, which produce a bumper crop of tomatoes and eggplant. Their newest experiment this year was starting strawberry plants from seed. It worked! Now they have a small strawberry patch as well.

Jorgensen Home

Their home is very important since they built it themselves with pine logs from their own woods.

The lumber for their home came out of their own woods. In 2000, they decided to build using square-cut, white pine logs with foam log tape in between to seal all cracks. This resulted in a beautiful home in the country.

Jorgensen Blacksmith

Gene’s dream of a blacksmith shop has become a reality.

Gene had always wanted a blacksmith shop. In 2005 when he bought a knife at the Salt Fork Festival, the gentleman told Gene about a blacksmith class being offered. Maggi thought it seemed like the perfect Christmas present. If someone took the class with Gene, they could do it for half price. The artistic Maggi took the class with him.

Jorgensen Library

Evidence for Gene’s skill at blacksmithing can be seen in the railings of their library.

Maggi made her first nail, a towel bar and towel rack in that class. Gene has metal creations all over the house inside and out. One of his favorites is making a cross out of a railroad tie. Now Gene has his own magnificent blacksmith shop containing a coal forge and filled with power tools such as: power hack saw, rod shear, punches, and stake plate.

This class has led them on an exciting new adventure. Gene had already been making jewelry for Maggi to wear to work. They were so popular that she sold almost everyone she wore.  Making copper jewelry became a favorite pastime with the blacksmith skills being used to make and repair needed tools.

Wishing to improve her natural creative talents, Maggi took watercolor and acrylic classes. They both want to make themselves the best they can be.

Jorgensen Necklaces

This is a sampling of the jewelry that will be on display at the Salt Fork Festival.

Their favorite metals for jewelry remains copper, which is always covered with a clear shellac. Recently, they’ve added sterling with brass and bronze for special touches.

Jorgensen Rings

Rings were a new item in 2017. Gene’s workbench shows the finished rings on the pliers’ handle.

In 2017, Gene began making rings. Five unique patterns come in various sizes. Watching Gene follow the steps for making a ring, it makes you realize how time consuming it is to get that perfect product. This work requires great patience.

Jorgensen Ice Box

Iceboxes are used for storage throughout the house. This one used for bathroom storagem originally served as icebox for Plainfield Store.

Their first show happened in 2011 at Octoberfest in downtown Cambridge. The following year they started sharing their products at the Salt Fork Arts & Crafts Festival. Maggi enjoyed coming to the festivals for years, but never expected to be showing at one. Now Painters Hollow Products have become a popular exhibit. Visit them in August at the Salt Fork Festival.

Jorgensen Gene

Gene enjoys his workshop where he can shape metal however he wishes.

Gene and Maggi are perfectly content on their farm. For them, it’s a good life and they never want to leave. They don’t even want to travel, except to craft shows, and their idea of a perfect evening would be sitting on their porch with a glass of wine.

I’ve got a blacksmith shop and the best partner anyone could have,” explained Gene. As for Maggi, “Life here is fun: the jewelry, garden and everyday life.”

Imagine everyone would wish for that kind of contentment.

 

Walt Taylor: Creative Inspiration to the Community

walt-student

Walt instructs one of his students in the proper way to use a pottery wheel.

One of the areas where Walt Taylor excels is passing on his love for art. That’s why he enjoys sharing his knowledge with adults and especially young people, as they’re our future artists.

As a small child he lived on a farm in Lebanon, Ohio where  he attended a one-room school that was very typical of schools in those days: no running water, out door toilets, a pot bellied stove, and a paddle hanging on the wall behind the stove.

Walt had a story to tell about that paddle. A school bully pushed him around one day and Walt swung his lunch bucket, and hit the bully in the head knocking him to the ground. Both were taken inside and leaned over a desk for a paddling. First, the bully received a stern thrashing while Walt quaked. When it was Walt’s turn, the teacher swung the paddle one time so hard it hit the side of the desk and broke in two. No paddling for Walt that day. Doesn’t sound like an accident on the part of the teacher to me.

vases-with-applique

He enjoys creating one of a kind vases with floral applique.

The family moved often. His father said, “A rolling stone gathers no moss, but it gains a great polish.” At one time they lived near Fort Ancient and Walt followed his dad around the field when he was plowing, and found many arrowheads. 

Woodcrafting has been a hobby since he was a young man. His building skills still go on today as he makes cabinets, chairs, and recently a communion stand for a local church that had just rebuilt.

walt-cabinet

This talented man made these oak chairs and the cabinet behind them.

For the past few years, he has been making one new chair for their dining room each year. But he said he has been procrastinating about finishing the last two. He even joined the Procrastinators Anonymous, but they haven’t had a meeting yet.

He also enjoyed working on automobiles so developed mechanical skills as well.  That came in handy as he and his wife, Sheila, motorcycled all over the country. His favorite places to ride were in the mountains out west. It was in those mountains of Montana, where they saw the work of western potters, that an interest for making pottery began.

They also discovered many things on those back roads that you just can’t see from the interstate. He thought he noticed something that looked like Stonehenge on one such road, but it turned out to be Carhenge. Here cars were buried front first in the ground. Then there was the House on a Rock, a motel on an Indian reservation, and the list goes on.

walt-first-piece

Walt holds the first piece of pottery he ever made…out of kitty litter.

It wasn’t until 1992 that Walt tried his hand at pottery. At Octoberfest, he purchased his first kiln and making pottery has become his passion ever since. The first bowl he made was out of ‘unused’ kitty litter! He learned that kitty litter had a clay base and when mixed with a little bit of water could be worked into shape. That bowl still sets on his bedroom stand today.

walt-sheila-001

Walt and Sheila  have attended many festivals in the area to display and sell their creations.

To begin with, he made pottery items just because he enjoyed doing it. Then he began giving them to his friends, who told him that he should be selling them. That began a business they ran until last year, Taymoor Pottery…a combination of his last name and his wife, Sheila’s maiden name.

walt-at-salt-fork-festival

Walt has a smile on his face while working with youngsters at Art in the Park during the Salt Fork Festival.

Walt and Sheila, hope to teach youngsters to enjoy art as much as they do. They’ve helped teach children’s art classes at the Salt Fork Festival for several years. Wherever Walt is making pottery, children can usually be found watching. Talking about children always brings a smile to his face as ,“They are fun to work with. If you treat them as equals, they accept you as you are.”

father-christmas-and-wife-2

Walt greeted visitors as Father Christmas for ten years, with help from Sheila.

For the last ten years, Walt has portrayed Father Christmas for Dickens Victorian Village. He would meet buses on the street or in the Welcome Center and probably has his picture in many family albums as a result. He’s not sure if he’ll be able to do that this year at the age of 91.

Even though the business is closed, they still enjoy making pottery. Now they make just what they like. Right now Raku, a Japanese style is a favorite. It was first used by the Japanese Emperor and was known as a ‘throw away pottery’. The emperor would drink his tea, then throw the cup against the wall.

walt-raku

His current favorite project centers around Raku, a Japanese form of art.

Raku is a ‘quick fire, quick cool’ kind of pottery so it would be fired and ready for supper quickly. Today in the United States a glaze is added and it’s no long a throw away. Actually it’s so attractive you wouldn’t want to throw it away.

walt-fishing

Walt still enjoys a day on the lake with his fishing pole.

Walt is just ‘a good old boy’, who has taken an interest in the community in many different ways. Thoughts of travel still skip through his mind and he often dreams of living in Hawaii or Tahiti…or at least visiting. Our world could use more of those ‘good old boys’.

Enjoy Musical Entertainment at the Salt Fork Festival

The Loves

The Loves Gospel Quartet

While most people think of artistic creations when headed to the Salt Fork Festival in Cambridge, Ohio, musical entertainment plays a large role in the festivities.

Jazz   Celtic   Bluegrass   Gospel   Bands   Dance   Strings  Drums

A wide variety of musical entertainment will be presented at the Salt Fork Festival from August 12-14, 2016 at the Cambridge City Park. Every day the Performing Arts Tent and Large Pavilion will be filled with music by many different groups.

Yurco Boys

The Yurco Boys

It all begins on Friday afternoon with The Yurco Boys, a talented group of young men who sing bluegrass music while strumming on their guitar, mandolin, and banjo. These young fellows are brothers and have been performing together for seven years. Their lively music is a crowd pleaser and they get better every year. Sometimes their little sister, Waverly, brings her fiddle along and joins in the fun.

Northwest Territory

Northwest Territory Bluegrass Band

They aren’t the only Bluegrass musicians this year. During the weekend you’ll also want to hear the Northwest Territory Bluegrass Band, a lively fast-moving quartet that also sings country, folk and gospel.

Buck & Company 001

Buck & Company

Buck & Company think Bluegrass people are the best people in the world and their dedication to high quality bluegrass is certain to please.

Chris Hart

Chris Hart

Chris Hart will portray a Civil War veteran in “Paws for the Cause”, a tale of Curly, a mascot during the war. This is a must see for every dog lover or Civil War buff.

Cambridge Jazz Band

Cambridge High School Alumni Jazz Band

Bands will also provide entertainment during the festival. The Cambridge High School Alumni Jazz Band brings back students who have enjoyed music over the years. Their quality of music brings listeners back again and again.

Berk Cambridge Band

Cambridge City Band

The ever popular Cambridge City Band has been active a long time. On this their 175th anniversary, you can expect some great music and even special antics by their conductor, Berk Jones. They are a pleasure all summer long at the Cambridge City Park.

Dance Central

Dance Central

Dance Central presents a vivacious program with students performing a wide variety of dances. Their dancers learn to express themselves through jazz, hip-hop, tap and ballet. This group puts on a vibrant show and often their dancers perform at community activities, such as the Cambridge Singers’ Concert or the Dickens’ Teddy Bear Tea.

 

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Toni Kellar “Roots to Rhythm”

A special feature will be Toni Kellar with her “Roots to Rhythm” program. Toni’s popular drum circles help people find their inner rhythm and soon the group is connected through this fantastic drumming technique.

PanJGea 2

PanJGea!

New to the area is a group called PanJGea from John Glenn High School. This steel drum band produces a sound and rhythm that everyone will enjoy. It’s indeed surprising to find the sound of the Caribbean here in Ohio as the band plays traditional calypso and Salo. But these youngsters also enjoy using their pans for rock and roll or doo-wop.

 

Dick Pavlov

Dick Pavlov entertains with his banjo.

Steve Miller

The talented Steve Miller strolls as he plays his guitar.

Strolling musicians throughout the weekend will play their music while walking the grounds of the festival. Dick Pavlov with his banjo and Steve Miller on guitar never seem to tire of playing.

Festival Chorus

This group has been planning the entertainment portion of the festival and have created a dynamic Festival Chorus, which will be performing on Sunday.The group consists of: Holly Phillips, Leonard Thomas, Bob Jones, Aaron Lashley, and Carol Jones. 

There is something for every musical taste during the Salt Fork Festival, August 12-14 at the Cambridge City Park. Come out and enjoy a weekend of outstanding artistic creations, fine musical entertainment, and refreshments to enjoy on a hot summer day. You may even want to try your hand at a workshop and do a little creating yourself.

Have fun at the Salt Fork Festival!

 

 

 

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