Places to go and things to see by Gypsy Bev

Posts tagged ‘Avella PA’

Rural 1890 Village at Meadowcroft Rockshelter

Blacksmith at work in his shop

Blacksmith at work in his shop

Peace and charm of living in a small rural community, previously the Miller family homestead, came to life at the 1890s Rural Village at Meadowcroft Rockshelter and Historic Village. Set at the far end of the complex, a visit here provided a relaxing spot in the day.

The village blacksmith demonstrated making a hook for a Dutch oven. Heat for the red-hot forge was produced by coal or coke. “Fanning the flame” provided the hottest heat needed for the perfect hook.

Miller home with garden

Miller home with garden

Betty Lamp

Betty Lamp was originally called the Better Lamp because it burned all night long using animal fat with a wick of twisted cloth.

The Miller Log House, constructed in 1795 by their great-great-grandfather, has been moved to the village. A garden planted nearby gave easy access to fresh vegetables.

While the children’s bedroom was upstairs, parents slept downstairs to protect them and keep the fire going through the night. All the furniture in the large downstairs’ room sat against the walls. That made it possible to come in the front door and walk straight to the fireplace on those cold winter days.

The guide explained that a second frame for a bed usually existed under the other beds so unexpected company could easily be handled. Their beds were made of straw and tightened with ropes to give them shape. Sometimes insects would get in the straw during the night, thus the saying: Good night, Sleep tight, Don’t let the bedbugs bite.

Desks with slates in old schoolhouse

Desks with slates in old schoolhouse

Bancroft Schoolhouse served as a one-room school for 10-20 students from 1834-1921. At that time, there were seven schools in a given mile radius. During the visit, a schoolmarm presented lessons of long ago to those in attendance. Original signatures of Bancroft students covered the blackboard while pictures of George Washington and Abraham Lincoln decorated the walls. Atop the double desks, two slates provided a place for students to write their lessons.

Entering the Methodist Episcopal Church from 1870 provided a glimpse back to the bare essentials of the church. Floors were bare with little ornate decorations around the church. A buggy, which brought the minister to the church service, waited outside.

Methodist Church

Methodist Episcopal Church with minister’s buggy outside

The Rural Village is just one part of the Meadowcroft Historical Complex, which also contains the famous Rockshelter archaeological site and Indian Village. Bring a picnic lunch and spend the day exploring, when they reopen in May.

Meadowcroft Rockshelter is found near Avella, PA off the beaten path. Your easiest bet might be to have your GPS guide you to 401 Meadowcroft Road in Avella, PA.

Meadowcroft Rockshelter Holds Early American History

Meadowcroft Welcome Center

Meadowcroft Welcome Center

This is no ordinary tourist spot! Near Avella, PA, hidden away in the mountains, stands a welcome center for the Meadowcroft Rockshelter. Go inside and watch a short video to hear the beginning of this 16,000 year old story. One visitor commented, “We wanted to see one of the oldest spots of human habitation in the United States.”

The site was first discovered back in 1950 by owner of the ground, Albert Miller. He had found some projectile points on his farm while taking a walk, but one day noticed a small artifact by a groundhog hole and decided to dig there. When Albert found bits of pottery and arrowheads buried, he felt like he was tearing pages out of a book, so the proper history could be read.

Dr. J.M. Adovasio from the University of Pittsburgh became interested and conducted the first professional research at the site.  More recent digs have been conducted by Adovasio at Mercyhurst Archaeological Institute using state-of-the-art equipment. It is considered to be one of the most carefully excavated sites in North America.

This rockshelter overhang provided shelter, as well as a vantage point, for early inhabitants from the time of George Washington back to 16,000 years ago. Archaeologists are studying traces of what those early cultures left behind so we can perhaps better understand those early people who lived in America.

Rockshelf Shelter

Stairs to Rockshelf Shelter

Getting out of your car at the Rockshelter, your eyes climb upward to the observation deck that has been built so visitors can get a closer look at the archaeological work being done. While today there is a long stairway for easy access, about ten years ago anyone wishing to climb to the rockshelter had to use a rope to help pull themselves up.

Archaeological Dig Site

Archaeological Dig Site

After a long climb to the top, visitors can see evidence of tools and campfires made by those early inhabitants thousands of years ago. The deck allows visitors to witness “Deep Hole”, where the oldest evidence exists. Rocks fell from the cliff above to cover many of the pieces of the past that are being uncovered today.

At the center of the dig, a fireplace was carefully excavated showing layers to make you smile. Starting at the top there was a layer of plastic bottles, then cans, beer and whiskey bottles, and finally clay bottles. This fireplace area was obviously used for relaxation purposes for generations.

These layers coincided with the people who stayed under this shelter for various reasons. Starting today and going back to George Washington’s time describes the most recent layers. Those deep layers describe life 16,000 years ago. While there is some skepticism over dates, they all admit that it was thousands of years ago.

View of Tags in Dig Site

View of Tags in Dig Site

Each find has been carefully tagged from spear points and arrowheads to bone fragments. This is one of the first sites that used computers in the archaeological field.  It is easy to see that much patience is needed in order to conduct this type of investigation. Sometimes they might work for months with a single-edge razor blade to scrape the rock from a piece of history.

Cross Creek

Cross Creek

After the climb back down, now the look at the Rockshelter gives you an idea of its purpose. The top seems a perfect place for a lookout to watch for approaching enemies, while under the rock cliff would be the perfect shelter for camping. Cross Creek cuts through the valley, and most likely cut through the sandstone surface of the rockcliff to help make it what it is today.

Searching for the past, helps us better understand the present.

Meadowcroft Rockshelter is found near Avella, PA off the beaten path. Your easiest bet might be to have your GPS guide you to 401 Meadowcroft Road in Avella, PA.

Or you can  take exit 17, Jefferson Ave (old exit 6) off I-70 West in Washington, PA. At the bottom of the ramp turn right. At the second light turn right onto Jefferson Ave. At the next light bear left onto 844. Follow 844 for 11 1/2 miles to the junction of 844 and 231 (just past Breezy Heights restaurant and driving range). Turn right onto 231 North. Go 1 1/2 miles to junction of 231 and 50. Turn left onto 50 West. Proceed 1 9/10 miles and turn right onto Fallen Timber Road. Go 1 3/10 miles and turn left onto Meadowcroft Road. Proceed 9/10 of a mile to Meadowcroft entrance on right. 

 

 

 

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