Places to go and things to see by Gypsy Bev

Posts tagged ‘Cindy Arent’

Creative Touch to Cambridge Glass Makes Treasures That Have Historic Value

Cambridge Ornaments - Fireplace MantleIf you break or chip a piece of your precious Cambridge Glass, don’t throw it away. There still might be a use for it.

   Cambridge Glass Company made beautiful pieces of glassware from 1902 -1958 that are still cherished today. Once in a while a piece gets scratched or even cracked, but those who love Cambridge Glass don’t want to throw it away.

Cambridge Chipped

A shelf filled with damaged Cambridge Glass waits to be transformed into ornaments.

   That’s when sisters Cindy Arent and Lindy Thatcher decided they would use these imperfect pieces to make Christmas ornaments. This year they made 170 ornaments and see them selling quickly at the National Museum of Cambridge Glass.

   All of the decorations they make are from imperfect donated glass. Some may be broken dramatically, while others may just have a chip or small crack. No perfect pieces are ever used to create an ornament.

Cambridge severely broken

The stem on a severely broken piece will someday hang on someone’s Christmas display.

   When a goblet is donated, Lindy cuts off the bowl and then cuts off the stem. Two ornaments can be made from one piece of damaged glass. The base of the goblet is not used for decorations.

Cambridge Lindy smooths

Lindy grinds the cut section smooth while wearing protective covering.

   She has a power saw that cuts the glass smoothly, but she still has to grind it to make the end perfectly smooth. Lindy is very cautious as knows that glass particles often fly through the air. She wears a respirator and protective glasses when grinding.

DSC04231

The top part of a goblet becomes a beautifully etched Christmas ornament.

   After grinding the edges, a bell cap is formed over the end from which it will be hung. An epoxy glue holds the bell cap in place after a few minutes of pressure before letting it set for 48 hours. Then a ring is attached for easy hanging.

Cambridge Cindy decorate

Cindy decorates the ornaments with ribbon and Christmas cheer.

   Every year in the springtime when National Cambridge Collectors Convention meets, Lindy and Cindy often get a new selection of items donated to them for use as ornaments. These ladies donate their time and materials, and all money from the sale of the ornaments is given to the National Museum of Cambridge Glass in Cambridge, Ohio.

Cambridge Sisters

Sisters Cindy and Lindy give all proceeds to the Cambridge Glass Museum.

   A favorite ornament is an etched goblet hung upside down so it resembles a bell. Add a beautiful gold or red bow and it’s the perfect highlight for your Christmas tree.

Cambridge OSU Buckeye and Rosepoint

This OSU Buckeye / Rose Point ornament is an eye-catcher.

   Requests are frequently given for ornaments of a particular pattern or color. A favorite of many is that ever-popular Rose Point. They are shipped all over the United States to people who had family working at Cambridge Glass. A perfect gift!

Cambridge and Cameron (2)

Cameron Fontana from Good Day Columbus chose a Christmas ornament for his wife.

   While Carl Beynon and Cindy began making jewelry in the form of necklaces and earrings from the broken glass many years ago, today those items are being created by Susan Elliott, an NCC member who now lives in New Concord. Her jewelry items can also be purchased in the gift shop at the museum.

Cambridge stem pictures

The wall behind Cindy’s work area shows different stem styles.

   Cindy and Lindy have a long family history of Cambridge Glass. Their aunt, Mary Martha Mitchell worked at the Cambridge Glass Company for most of her life so the girls heard about it all through their youth. Today both ladies are on the Board of Directors for the National Museum of Cambridge Glass. Cindy is the museum director while Lindy is the treasurer.

Cambridge Wildflower ornament

A Cambridge Wildflower ornament is trimmed in gold.

   While Cindy had heard about Cambridge Glass all her life, her interest was piqued when her husband, Mike, bought her a Cambridge Glass Moonlight bowl as a Christmas present. Her interest shortly thereafter became more serious.

   Lindy often went with her Aunt Mary to glass shows all over the country. She couldn’t help but catch the fever traveling with someone who for over thirty years had served as secretary to Presidents of the Cambridge Glass, A.J. Bennett and W.L. Orme.

Creative Team

These busy ladies at the museum, Cindy, Sharon, and Lindy, also co-chair the Dickens Creative Team.

   Not only do these ladies volunteer their time to the Glass Museum, Lindy, Cindy and Sharon Bachna are also co-chairs of the Creative Team, which designs the Victorian scenes for Dickens Victorian Village. Cambridge is fortunate to have such dedication. They are busy and creative volunteers!

Cambridge Ornament Display

Ornaments can be purchased from the museum display.

   Cambridge Glass is still treasured in many ways today. You can find these spectacular sparkling ornaments in the gift shop at the National Museum of Cambridge Glass on 9th Street in Cambridge, Ohio. Their Holiday Hours from November 1 – December 21 are Friday and Saturday from noon – 4:00. 

   Cambridge Glass ornaments will add a special touch to your tree or home. For many, they will bring back memories of family members who worked at the factory. Stop by and visit their outstanding displays. It’s a great place to find a special sparkling Christmas gift or perhaps a treasure for yourself.

National Museum of Cambridge Glass is located at 136 South 9th Street in Cambridge, Ohio just a half block off Wheeling Avenue. Cambridge is located at the crossroads of I-70 and I-77 for easy access.

Cambridge Glass Goes Hollywood

Hooray for Hollywood and Cambridge Glass!

Betty

Betty Sivard. a long time volunteer, tells visitors about Cambridge Glass used in Hollywood and on television.

It’s not surprising that the famous Cambridge Glass has been used in countless movies over the years as it exudes glamour as well as beauty. Several of these pieces are being featured in two large showcases  at the National Museum of Cambridge Glass  in Cambridge, Ohio, along with photos and cards designating the movies and stars.

Throughout the display of over 6,000 pieces of the collectible Cambridge Glass, other references to Hollywood movies and television shows appear frequently. A few years back a member spotted a piece of Cambridge Glass being used in a movie. After reporting this to the group, all eyes became focused on glassware used in movies. You’ll be surprised  at how often Cambridge Glass appears.

Elvis Presley

This beverage set was used on Elvis Presley’s plane, The Lisa Marie, which was named after his daughter.

This locally made fine glassware isn’t seen only in older movies. Recently, The Astronaut Wives Club toasted a special moment with Cambridge Rose Point Stemware. In the current series, Empire, stars used an Amethyst Decanter and Sherries.

White Christmas

Bing Crosby holds an engraved Bexley champagne glass in White Christmas. It’s a museum favorite!

It’s impressive to think that local men and women had a hand in producing exquisite glass items that are fine enough quality to be used in Hollywood and television. A favorite on display shows  Bing Crosby holding an engraved Bexley champagne glass in the year-after-year favorite of White Christmas.

Cambridge Glass Hollywood Stars

When group tours request a Hollywood program, these volunteers represent White Christmas (Cindy Arent), Astronaut Wives Club (Sandi Rohrbough), Mae West (Sharon Bachna), and Gunsmoke (Sarah Carpenter).

If you are interesting in the Hollywood presence of Cambridge Glass, arrangements can be made by tour groups to have volunteers entertain in costume and even break into song. Groups might hear The Haynes Sisters sing, “Sisters, sisters, there were never such devoted sisters…”  Or meet Mae West as she flings her boa and entertains the crowd.

The museum has created a DVD showing some of the movies as well as the Cambridge Glass used, so you know what to look for throughout the museum. The volunteers will then serve as your guides for your stay at the museum.

The Sting

On each end of the bar, The Sting used a Crown Tuscan Flying Lady Bowl filled with peanuts.

These guides not only know their glassware well, but they tell interesting stories along the way. An example would be the story of the Crown Tuscan Flying Lady Bowl used in The Sting.

In the early days of Cambridge Glass Co, a circus came to town. Several of the glassworkers attended the event. One of those had artistic talents and drew a picture of the trapeze artist performing that day. That picture was taken back to a talented mold maker, who developed this artistic Flying Lady Bowl. What talented men!

Even the western television shows used Cambridge Glass for a touch of glamour. In an episode of Gunsmoke, a little girl was casting her eyes on an etched Portia Doulton water pitcher. The Wild Wild West used a Cambridge Glass perfume atomizer as part of its background.

Clark Gable

This beautiful Royal Blue Luncheon Set was a wedding gift to Clark Gable and Carole Lombard.

A personal favorite was the Cambridge Royal Blue and Crystal luncheon set that Clark Gable and Carole Lombard received as a wedding present from a friend in Ft. Wayne, Indiana back in 1939. Nice to know the stars actually used this fine glassware in their homes as well as in the movies.

Prizzi's Honor

This eye-catching Royal Blue pitcher with silver overlay was used in Prizzi’s Honor.

While there are too many to list in this short article, a few favorites have been mentioned. Perhaps they will give you a desire to search out more Hollywood appearances throughout the museum yourself.

You’ll be impressed.

The National Museum of Cambridge Glass is located at 136 S. 9th Street just a half block off Wheeling Avenue in downtown Cambridge, Ohio.

 

 

 

 

Tag Cloud