Places to go and things to see by Gypsy Bev

Posts tagged ‘Zanesville Ohio’

Secluded Mission Oaks Gardens

A garden must combine the poetic and the mysterious

with a feeling of serenity and joy.

~Luis Barragan

mission-oaks

The entrance at Mission Oaks leads you down a path of tranquility surrounded by blossoms.

“The Secret Garden” describes this hidden-away place of relaxation in the midst of an older  residential area of Zanesville. Mission Oaks Gardens has over seven acres to keep you in the arms of Mother Nature.

Pink Tulips

Beds of colorful pink tulips brighten the pathway in the spring.

The setting acquired its name because the home had the appearance of a mission-house surrounded by oaks. Today that name acquires a double meaning as they definitely have a mission: to provide and protect a little piece of nature for all to enjoy.

Tiger Lilies

Tiger Lilies brighten the pathway in this peaceful garden.

Here you will find everything from waterfalls to conifer forests at no cost to you or your friends. Seven days a week from dawn until dusk, you are invited to relax surrounded by flowers, or explore these seven peaceful acres for free.

pathway-to-beauty

This beautiful stone pathway always has flowers along its edge.

From springtime until fall, flowers of the season flow along the stone path…from tulips to mums. The porch makes a pleasant place to sit and enjoy the aroma of the fragrant blossoms.

mission-oaks-home-surrounded-by-flowers

The Hendley’s home is surrounded by flowers from spring through fall.

Established in 1925, legend has it this charming mission style home was built by a local businessman for his mistress, a party dress designer during the roaring 20s. But for the last twenty-five years, the home has been owned by Albert “Bert” and Susan Hendley.

When Bert first saw the abandoned mansion in 1988, he told his wife, “You’ve got to be crazy. This place is a dump.” Now, Bert’s developed a masterpiece of beauty and he takes great pleasure in finding unique and rare plants for visitors to view.

Flowers around every corner

Flowers appeared throughout the property.

The Perennial Garden surrounds the charming home. From early spring until fall, you’ll find something blooming from hyacinths and peonies to chrysanthemums and sunflowers. Relax in the gazebo being surrounded by the sight and scent of nature. New blossoms open every week.

Woods

Flower strewn paths meander through the forest setting.

After you have had a leisurely walk through the upper gardens, then it’s time to explore the rest of the acreage. Head down a steep flight of stairs, or enter the garden from the rear entrance, which is marked with stone pillars.  The sight before you, right in the middle of Zanesville, will amaze you.

rustic-gazebo-in-the-middle-of-the-woods

This rustic gazebo in the middle of the woods provides a respite from the cares of the day.

Once into the forested section of the garden, the paths go two separate directions. One path leads to the Woodland Garden, while the other descends to the Conifer Garden.

Paths meander throughout the wooded areas with surprises around every bend. While no overall plan was ever made for the gardens, unusual rare trees and flowers greet you at surprising places along the pathways.

Waterfall

Relax while watching the smooth flow of the waterfall.

The wooded section includes two small waterfalls, which flow over rocky hillsides into a small pond at one end, and a small stream on the other. At the small pond, elegant water lilies and lotuses bloom along the water’s edge. Comfortable wooden benches provide a great spot to relax while soaking up the ambiance of the scenic view.

small-lake-in-conifer-forest

This small lake in Conifer Forest offers calm waters to soothe the soul.

Over 300 trees give plenty of shade to the home and wooded areas. This includes original white oaks as well as many unusual trees Bert has discovered in his travels. In addition there are nearly 200 conifers, making Mission Oaks acknowledged for having one of the most renowned conifer gardens in Ohio.

Spring in bloom

Azaleas burst into bloom to welcome springtime.

Mission Oaks provides the perfect place to avoid the maddening crowds, relax in meditation, take a walk with Mother Nature, or just run away from home for the day. Many find it the perfect place for wedding or prom pictures.

All this is kept beautiful by the Muskingum Valley Park Department with assistance of Mission Oaks Foundation staff and many volunteers. Be sure to stop in Zanesville at 1864 Euclid Avenue – not far from Maple Avenue – and visit this hidden gem…if you can find it!

 

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National Road – Zane Grey Museum

Zane Grey Museum

The Zane Grey Museum was originally constructed to resemble a frontier fort.

Three pieces of history are superbly woven together at the National Road – Zane Grey Museum between New Concord and Zanesville, Ohio along old Route 40. Learn about the road to the West, famous author Zane Grey, and Zanesville potteries.

Way back in 1811, Ebenezer Zane discussed with George Washington the need for a road across the newly settled country. Washington agreed it was vital to the future of the country so proclaimed, “Open a wide door, and make a smooth Way.” That began Zane’s Trace, which became part of the National Road.

Zane Grey Crossing

Diorama sections show their difficult work in constructing The National Road over streams.

The museum presents a detailed 136′ diorama depicting life on the original National Road, often called “The Main Street of America”. All the figures are hand made from clay and accurate down to the tiniest detail.  The first road was dirt, followed by the Corduroy Road made of logs, making it very rough. Eventually a stone foundation was in place with crushed stone on the top, and finally bricks

Zane Grey Ferries

Ferries took wagons and supplies across the Ohio River.

Every mile a stone mile marker gave travelers information on mileage to various towns along the way. A Gunter Chain, 66′ long, was used to measure the distance of one mile time and time again. If you moved the 66′ chain X 80 times = 5,280 ‘, the distance of one mile. The Gunter Chain also measured the distance across the road – 66’.

Zane Grey Diorama

Logs formed the Corduroy Road, a rough stretch to travel.

After WWI, Dwight Eisenhower led a convoy of trucks across the National Road, and during WWII, General Eisenhower discovered the Autobahn in Germany. When he became president he felt it of high importance to develop better highways in America. Thus began our interstate highway system.

Zane Grey Stop

The 10 Mile House provided refreshments along the highway. Baker’s Motel is located on that spot today.

Pearl Zane Grey, being born in Zanesville, traveled this road frequently. His early writing attempts were squelched by his father, who insisted that Zane attend the University of Pittsburgh so he could be a dentist and follow in his father’s footsteps. Zane did graduate with a degree in dentistry after enjoying a time of pitching his great curve ball on the college baseball team, where he enjoyed a full baseball scholarship.

When he married Dolly, her encouragement and editing abilities, along with a nice inheritance, made it possible for Zane to abandon his dental practice and begin following his passions…writing and fishing.

Zane Grey Study

Zane Grey wrote his books by hand in his study, surrounded by native American items he had collected in his travels.

His first book was Betty Zane, the story of a young girl who helped save Fort Henry. But it was Riders of the Purple Sage that put popularity into Grey’s writings. His books sold like hot cakes. Zane wrote all his stories in long hand, then his wife, Dolly, typed them and had them published. Many were turned into movies.

Zane enjoyed fishing more than anything else and spent over 300 days a year at that sport. He split the money from the books with Dolly, and he spent his half on fishing, boats, and travel. When he traveled out West, he filled his tablets with descriptions of the scenes he saw, for use in his stories.

Zane Grey fishing

Big-game fishing was the real passion in his life.

The only books that sold more copies than Grey’s at that time were the Bible and school primers. Hemingway was quite jealous of Grey, not because of his successful writing career, but because of his great fishing ability. Zane’s love of the great out-of-doors can be seen in all of his books through his detailed descriptions. 

Now how does the fantastic collection of pottery fit in? The perfect clay for making pottery could be found in this area quite easily – in dirt roads, such as the National Road, which had clay as their base. Potters would go out to the road and dig up a small portion of clay to make a vase or bowl. This became known as a “potters’ hole”. Thus the term we use today for a hole in the road – “pot hole”.

Zane Grey Pottery

This is a small section of the Zanesville Pottery collection on display.

But the collection goes beyond those humble beginnings and includes the work of over 132 potteries in the Zanesville area. Thousands of workers contributed to this large display, which was originally the collection of Mr. Downey, the owner of Conn’s Potato Chips. Upon his death, half of his pottery was given to the Zane Grey Museum for display, while the other half is in the Zanesville Museum of Art.

Zane Grey Model T

Find surprises along the way like this Model T Ford.

Next time you travel along the Old National Road, today’s Route 40, stop at the National Road – Zane Grey Museum and watch a film about the life of Zane Grey. The knowledgeable guides will lead you down the road to books, movies, pottery…and some surprises along the way.

National Road – Zane Grey Museum is located on old Route 40 about a half mile from I-70, Exit 164, Norwich Exit. The museum is located between New Concord and Zanesville, Ohio.

 

Ghosts – Believer or Skeptic

Caution Ghost Crossing! could easily be a sign encountered quite often by members of the Southeastern Ohio Paranormal Investigators.   And on a Saturday in February, ghost hunting appeared to be a very popular subject as the auditorium at the John McIntire Library in Zanesville, Ohio was packed with adults seeking to learn more about ghosts. While the curious were gathering, videos of ghost hunts were being shown to whet the appetite. Members of the S.E.O.P.I. were on hand to give information about the technical aspect of ghost hunting, historic research involved, as well as psychic and metaphysical connections.

Started four years ago, the S.E.O.P.I. has become a popular source for people who feel they have a ghost on  their property, and even for those wanting help getting their ghosts to move on. Tom Robson, lead investigator, said that while they continue to explore all possibilities, “There can’t be an expert in a field with no scientific evidence.” As a youngster, Tom had an experience with the paranormal as well as a deep interest in history. Now he has discovered how  the two seem to be closely connected. What started out to be just a part time hobby for him has nearly turned into a full time job.

The evidence that has been captured is 90% on audio and only 10% on video. There was a nice display of the instruments used to capture the sounds and pictures at the various haunted establishments. Some of their favorite instruments included: the Olympus digital audio recorder, Zoom H1 microphone, and Zoom H2, which was so powerful they said you could hear raindrops three rooms away.

For example, during an Electronic Voice Phenomena (EVP) session on the Triangular Field in Gettysburg, questions were asked of a spirit and there were many responses recorded that were easily understood.  Responses were short such as : “Right”, “OK”, or  “I know”. When leaving the field, the team said, “Blessings to all,” to which a voice answered, “Thank you.” The recording equipment produces some very interesting results.

Historian, Gary Felumlee, presented paranormal research tips, because knowing the time period you are dealing with could be vital for a successful communication. His goal is eventually to show by scientific means that the unusual activity is from the spirit world. Gary recently wrote about one of these historic paranormal experiences in a book entitled Public Spirits Of The Old Putnam District Of Zanesville Ohio.

An interesting observation that Gary pointed out was the fact that you need to introduce yourself to the ghost. That will make them more comfortable and more likely to stay in the vicinity and if you are lucky even answer your questions. So he suggested that you say something like, “My name is ***** and I’m here to learn about you.”

The metaphysical side of investigations was also covered with April Lovejoy explaining the world of crystals and meditation. Often team members wear particular crystals as protective devices from the spirits.  She actually had the entire audience practice five minutes of meditation to learn to focus their mind in one place.  This helps, too, when on a paranormal investigation as it permits the team a close connection to the place they are visiting.

Well know psychic, Ellen Bone, described an actual investigation where through psychic connection they were able to find the location of the spirit and release it from the residence. Ellen’s natural intuitive qualities were always encouraged by her family where psychic activities were accepted as part of the norm. She believes we are all connected, and does her work with honesty and kindness.

Evidence was shared through recordings, photos, and videos. It was surprising how many establishments in the area have had some paranormal activity. They presented information on several places where the S.E.O.P.I. team had been welcomed to investigate. These included many places right here in Ohio: Penny Court, Col. Taylor Bed & Breakfast, and Cambridge Performing Arts Centre in Cambridge; Zak’s Restaurant, Papa Chuck’s Pizza, Zanesville Community Theater, Stone Academy, and Schultz Mansion in Zanesville; Licking County Jail in Newark; and The Captain’s House in Dresden, just to name a few.

Door prizes, including gift certificates, tee shirts, books, and pictures were given out throughout the program. To make the prizes extra special, all were donated by businesses where paranormal activity has been a frequent occurrence.

What do you think? Have you encountered any ghostly experiences in your world? Time to decide: Believer or Skeptic!

Southeastern Ohio Paranormal Investigators are a select group of researchers from many walks of life. The group is based in Zanesville, Ohio and assists residents and businesses that encounter suspected paranormal activities.

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