Places to go and things to see by Gypsy Bev

Posts tagged ‘Cy Young’

Baseball Legend Cy Young Called Tuscarawas County Home

Cy Welcome to Museum

This photo with Cy’s old rocking chair welcomes you to the Olde Main Street Museum.

Baseball, Hot Dogs, Apple Pie and Chevrolet. Those are things that are American to the core. In the nearby town of Newcomerstown, a baseball legend grew up and his legacy is still celebrated today.

  Denton True Young was born in Gilmore, not far from Newcomerstown. Called Dent as a youngster, the lad went to a two-room school in Gilmore but only went through the sixth grade. The boys loved to play baseball and would often either walk or ride horseback for twenty miles to play the game.

   To practice pitching, Dent would throw a ball (if he had one) into a target on the barn door, or walnuts through the knot holes in the fence. It’s no wonder he was known for accuracy during his pitching career.

Cy ball and glove

Cy’s glove holds a baseball marked 1897 – Cleveland…the date he pitched his first no-hitter against the Cincinnati Reds.

   Dent received his first contract from a team in Canton at the age of 23. They paid him $60 a month. Wanting to impress his teammates, he threw the ball so hard that no catcher wanted to catch him, so he threw into the fence. One fellow said it looked like a cyclone had struck the fence. The name stuck and Cyclone was his listed name for two years. That soon became shortened to Cy, a name which stayed with him through the rest of his life.

Cy Indians program

This old Indians scorecard only cost a dime.

   Over the years, he played with Cleveland, St. Louis, and Boston. He holds the records of most innings pitched at 7,356 and most wins with 511, a record that is not likely to be broken. Not many could pitch like he did in both games of a double header…and he never had a sore arm!

Cy - 1892 Scrapbook

His personal 1892 scrapbook is on display at the museum.

   In 1914, a young man in Newcomerstown by the name of Jimmie Knowles had a shoeshine stand in front of the newspaper office. He remembers Cy Young coming to town almost every weekend in his big Cadillac and parking it on Main Street. Then he’d stop by and have Jimmie polish his shoes. He always left a tip.

Cy - Trophies

This framed photo shows Cy with his many trophies.

   Cy tried his hand at management for one year with the Cleveland Green Socks as he had a hankering to get back into the world of baseball. But the league was dissolved and Cy returned to Tuscarawas County.

   When Cy retired at the age of 45, he enjoyed the life of a gentleman farmer in Peoli. There he raised potatoes, and tended sheep, hogs, and chickens and enjoyed hunting and fishing.

Cy - ax and wood he chopped

This ax belonged to Cy Young and it is said this is some of the last wood he chopped.

   When his wife, Roba, died in 1933, Cy lost a good friend as they had known each other since childhood. After her death, he worked at various jobs and eventually moved in with friends and helped them bale hay, handle the horse and even chop wood.

   He was an active member of the community and moved up through the ranks of the Masons, was a member of the local Elks Club and was elected to the Republican Party Central Committee.

   Old-timers baseball games gave him pleasure and a chance to meet old friends. In 1937, Cy Young was voted into the Baseball Hall of Fame in the second class ever. He was the first to donate memorabilia to their new museum in Cooperstown.

Cy - Showcase

Several showcases at Olde Main Street Museum contain Cy Young memorabilia.

   In 1948, great excitement filled Newcomerstown as Cy Young was to be honored at Cleveland Stadium for his 80th birthday. To make the day even more special, Bill Veeck, the owner of the Cleveland Indians, arranged for the C&M Railroad to make a stop in Newcomerstown and bring the whole town to Cleveland at no cost to residents.

   Pitching was Cy’s specialty and he threw a fastball with cannonball speed that few could hit. Because of his fantastic pitching ability, the Cy Young Award was created in 1956 and given annually to an outstanding pitcher in all of baseball. Beginning in 1967 through today, the award is given to a pitcher in each league.

Cy - Cy Young Park

The Cy Young Park in Newcomerstown remembers one of baseball’s original legends.

   The first Cy Young Festival was held in 1958 in Newcomerstown. Every year a baseball star pitcher is featured. This year it will be Randy Jones, who won the Cy Young Award in 1978 when he played for the San Diego Padres. Great names such as Dwight Gooden, Dean Chance, and Vida Blue have attended the festival.

Cy- Tombstone

Fans visit his Peoli tombstone to leave baseballs and other memorabilia.

   The festival begins on Saturday morning with a Cy Young Run. Afterward, a car caravan can be seen heading to Cy’s grave in nearby Peoli at the Peoli Church. You might stop along the way at the Newcomerstown McDonald’s where they have a large display honored this hometown hero.

Cy - McDonald's

Stop by Newcomerstown McDonald’s for wall displays about this local hero.

   The afternoon is filled with bands, food, and fun for everyone. The annual parade begins at 6:00 and stops at the Olde Main Street Museum. There they have a special display of Cy Young memorabilia.

Cy - Olde Main Street Museum

Cy’s memorabilia can be seen at the Olde Main Street Museum in Newcomerstown.

   Sunday begins with an Old Timers Vintage Baseball game at the Cy Young Memorial Park Field. Players will be dressed in uniforms similar to those of the mid-1800s and use the same rules and language of the Civil War era. Or you might prefer to go to a Car Show on Main Street, a talent show or pet show. There are events for everyone to enjoy.

Cy - 1 953 Little League Opening

He appeared at the Newcomerstown 1953 Little League Opening where he encouraged youngsters to play ball.

   The Annual Cy Young Days Festival is held in Newcomerstown in June of each year. The festival not only promotes Cy Young but also increases awareness of all the youth baseball and softball programs in the Newcomerstown area. It’s all about Cy Young and baseball, the game he loved.

Cy Young won 511 games in 22 seasons and pitched three no-hitters. Imagine what kind of contract he could command today for an arm like that.

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Temperance Tavern Museum Holds Tales of Newcomerstown Area

Temperance Tavern Sign

This sign in front of the museum explains the history of the town.

The Delaware Indians settled a village along the Tuscarawas River at what is today Newcomerstown. In 1776, over 700 Delaware Indians lived there with a few English colonists. The Indians called their village Gekelemukpechunk, but the settlers called it Newcomerstown after the Delaware Chief Newcomer of the Turtle Tribe.

Temperance Tavern Delaware Indians

These Delaware Indians arrowheads and artifacts are an important part of the town’s history.

   During the time of the Ohio & Erie Canal, the tavern and inn in Newcomerstown, Ohio was a popular stop for canal boats. One of the oldest homes in town, built in 1841 by Andrew Creter, Temperance Tavern was made of black walnut and still contains many of the original features.

Temperance Tavern

Temperance Tavern Museum, a beautiful old tavern and inn, is one of the oldest homes in Newcomerstown.

   The home and tavern was conveniently built between the canal and the stagecoach trail. One home on Canal Street still has the original canal ditch in their front yard. The ditch was never filled in.

   The Creter family lived on the first floor, while rooms on the second floor housed only women. Single men were literally locked in the attic to keep any embarrassing moments from happening with the lady guests. The basement contained Temperance Tavern. While the names don’t seem to fit together perfectly, no alcohol was served in this tavern.

   Miss Elizabeth, wife of Andrew Creter, still visits the house in spirit. While her form is seldom seen, frequently doors move and cabinets open. She keeps watch over her house.

Temperance Tavern Fireplace

This stone fireplace provided a place to cook meals for visitors to the inn.

   The kitchen has a large fireplace where all the tavern meals were cooked. The cast iron utensils hung over the fireplace for easy access in meal preparation. Meals were cooked and served here for people from the canal and stage, but it was also a local gathering place. The table served not only as a place for meals, but operations took place there as well.

Temperance Tavern Oven

Behind this cabinet was where slaves were hidden on the Underground Railroad.

   This was also a stop for the Underground Railroad. Slaves were hidden in the cellar of this house. You can still see a cabinet that concealed where slaves hid on their Underground Railroad route.

Temperance Tavern Miss Rose Tea Set

This beautiful Moss Rose Tea Set came all the way from Virginia in 1820.

   The dining room table displayed a beautiful Moss Rose Tea Set, which was brought to Newcomerstown from Virginia in 1820 by Mrs. John Snyder. The living room features military artifacts as well as a collection of dresses from the 1800-1900 time frame.

Temperance Tavern Wedding Dress

The wedding dress of Maude Scott highlights this display of clothing from 1800-1900.

   A wedding dress from 1894 belonging to Maude Scott shows the style of the time. It also gives history of one of those early prominent women in the Tuscarawas County area. Maude Scott was the first woman in the county to be elected to public office and formed the first Republican Women’s Club there, a couple examples of her forward thinking.

   Here also, you will find memorabilia honoring two of Newcomerstown’s favorite sons, Cy Young, the most winning pitcher in baseball, and Woody Hayes, Ohio State’s well-known and adored coach.

Temperance Tavern Woody

Woody Hayes, Ohio State University football coach, went to school here.

   Woody’s dad was superintendent of schools in Newcomerstown. After graduation from Newcomerstown High School, Woody coached football at Mingo Junction and New Philadelphia before moving on to Ohio State.

Temperance Tavern Cy Young

This 1908 Boston Red Sox uniform belonging to Cy Young is on display at the museum.

   One special item in the museum is Cy Young’s complete 1908 Boston Red Sox uniform. The memorabilia span his life from baseball player to retiree, who enjoyed sitting on his front porch in a rocking chair, which is also in the museum today. From 1890-1911, Young won 511 games with an ERA if 2.63. No wonder he is a local hero.

Temperance Tavern Civil War Monument

Outside the museum stands a monument to Freeman Davis, a local Civil War hero.

   Outside the Temperance Tavern Museum is a monument honoring Freeman Davis, a local man who earned the Congressional Medal of Honor during the Civil War. Davis served as a sergeant with Company B, 80th Ohio Volunteer Infantry during the war and his commendation came due to his bravery in the Battle of Missionary Ridge in Tennessee.

Main Street BJ

BJ McFadden has served as president of the Newcomerstown Historical Society for several years but recently stepped down from that post.

   Located at 221 Canal Street in Newcomerstown, the Temperance Tavern Museum opens its doors each Memorial Day weekend through the end of October on Tuesday – Sunday. Every small town has interesting history to share. Stop by and explore Temperance Tavern Museum this summer!

The museum is located at 221 West Canal Street in Newcomerstown, Ohio. Off I-77, take Exit 65 for US 36, Turn left on US 36 and then take the second exit, Ohio 258, to Newcomerstown to the left onto Pilling Street. After a short distance, turn right onto East Canal Street and about a mile down the street you’ll find the museum on the left.

Stroll Down Memory Lane at Olde Main Street

Main Street

Volunteer shopkeepers line Olde Main Street.

Take a walk down Olde Main Street and view life as it used to be in the early 1940s. Twenty-three store fronts take you back to businesses that served their customers in that era.

Through the inspiration of Barb and Vane Scott II, the Olde Main Street Museum in Newcomerstown opened its doors in 2009 after four years of much hard work and dedication to the project.Since opening, a dressing room and parking lot have been added.

Main Street Ford Garage

Shumaker’s Ford car dealership made its home here in 1915.

The Ford car dealership of Lell Shumaker was originally in this building back in 1915, followed by a factory making carbide tools. The carbide residue created an extensive cleaning problem when organizing the museum.

Today family members are still keeping up that tradition as Vane Scott III, and his granddaughter, Meredith, participate in the enactment of scenes. They both take great pride in carrying on this family inspired project.

Main Street Post Office

Ray McFadden talks to the postmaster regarding his late mail.

Ray and BJ McFadden have been instrumental in organizing this immense project.Their purpose was to restore an authentic village using only things that came from Newcomerstown.  They wanted to establish a Community Center where groups could be entertained and served a catered meal while enjoying the feeling of stepping back in time.

Main Street BJ

BJ McFadden plays a large role in helping the museum go forward.

Now bus tour groups frequently take a break here to have lunch while hearing tales of a bygone era. Class reunions step back to the era of their high school days as shopkeepers dress in costumes according to the time period.  Visitors sitting on Main Street feel like they’re reliving their teenage years.

Main Street Jail

This prisoner was a bootlegger.

Many of the store fronts have shopkeepers who tell a little about their line of work. There was even a prisoner in jail, who had been arrested for making some home brew out in the woods. Main Street came alive with memories of the days of WWII as shopkeepers complained of there being little male help at their business.

Main Street Shoe Repair

A shoe repairman, portrayed by Vane Scott III, complained because the blacksmith was repairing boots.He bellowed,”I don’t make horseshoes, so you shouldn’t fix boots.” 

Showcase Alley contains rotating collections of local people. Former area residents Cy Young and Woody Hayes each have their own showcase of memorabilia.

In 1948, there was great excitement in town as the whole town was invited to Cleveland Stadium where Cy Young was to be honored on his 80th birthday. Owner of the Indians, Bill Veeck, made it possible for the C&M Railroad to stop in Newcomerstown and carry the entire town to Cleveland at no cost to residents.

Main Street Circus

This detailed circus train collection is highlighted in Showcase Alley.

A miniature circus, purchased by Vane Scott II, was used as a traveling display by the Scott family. The fine details of this circus were first created in Germany, but Vane, the sign painter, touched them up to perfection.

It’s so pleasing to see a community cooperate on such a large project such as this with just volunteers. They take great pride in their museums and rightly so. Next door is a second historic stop, Temperance Tavern, which is packed with local history.

Main Street Music

The Music Room honors native son, Manuel Yingling, who played trombone with the John Philip Sousa Band.

When scheduling a tour there or attending one of their many events, enjoy time in this living history museum. Meander down Main Street of long ago and smile as the memories appear.

Olde Main Street Museum is open Tuesday – Saturday from 10-4, and on Sunday from 1-4. If you would like to have your group visit for one of their many interesting programs, they will rearrange their schedule.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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