Places to go and things to see by Gypsy Bev

Archive for the ‘Zanesville’ Category

Explore Constantly Changing Zanesville Museum of Art

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The sculpture, “Outlook”, attracts attention to the Zanesville Museum of Art

“Outlook”, a large scale sculpture, greets visitors on the front lawn of the Zanesville Museum of Art. This eye-catching, bright red metal sculpture was created by David Black, professor at Ohio State for 30 years.

His connection to Zanesville happened long ago when his creative side focused on ceramics. He’d drive from Columbus to Roseville for the perfect clay he needed. His awards for ceramics and sculptures create an extensive list.

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Three floors containing over 7000 creative works of art can be found at the museum.

Inside the Zanesville Museum of Art, you’ll find a wide variety of treasures that span 5,000 years. Around every corner and in every room, different special displays pull you along. And they are changing constantly! Their mission is to ignite human imagination and understanding through the visual arts.

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This bronze bust of Raymond Thomas, who contributed his pottery collection to the museum, was made by local sculptor, Alan Cottrill.

This project began back in 1936 when it was called Zanesville Art Institute being located in downtown Zanesville. Established by Mr. and Mrs. Edward Ayers, their personal collections of paintings, sculpture, glass and ceramics became the foundation for the museum.

In 1975, more room was needed and it moved to its present location on Military Road. There are over 7,000 objects in 18 varied galleries on three floors with items you would only expect to see in a much larger city. They are quite proud of their museum and rightfully so.

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This Roseville Pottery display is one of many pottery exhibits throughout the museum.

The museum is well-known for its pottery collections as Zanesville was once the pottery capital of the world. So it follows that this would be the perfect place for pottery display by local companies including: Owens, Roseville and Weller. Displays show the progression of their works in an excellent timeline. Many consider pottery to be the heart of the museum.

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The Madame Alexander Doll Collection contains over 600 dolls.

The Madame Alexander Doll Company has a magnificent Americana Collection of dolls being shown at the Zanesville Museum of Art. Here you’ll find everything from dolls depicting nursery rhymes to those wearing dresses of the first ladies. Over 600 dolls make it a spot young ladies like to spend time.

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This colorful ceramic “Tree of Life” Candelabrum celebrates a Mexican religious holiday.

Two special art displays are being featured through January 7, 2017. The Carl E. Eriksson Collection features original paintings and sketches by The Eight. This group of eight artists drew people from all walks of life. They made a difference in the world of art by moving from traditional to realistic scenes featuring scenes of every day life.

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“Every Family Has a Black Shell” by Marilyn Stocker won the Award of Distinction.

The second is a juried exhibition by Southeastern Ohio Watermedia Society. The art work is outstanding here and many local artists are featured. There is also a section for displaying student art, featuring different schools each month.

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An Italian Votive “Sculpture of a Foot” dates back to 400 – 200 B.C.

The oldest items can be found in two places. In the Sculpture Gallery, two Roman sculptures date before 200 B.C. The Greek sculptures contain a votive, which looks like a foot, that also dates before 200 B.C.

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Original furnishings from a 1690s home in England are the setting for the Old Masters Gallery.

But the favorite spot is the Ayers Collection in the English Panel Room. You step back in time to a dining room from 1690 in Hatton Garden, the home of Sir Christopher Hatton, Chancellor under Queen Elizabeth I. Even the wood paneling is original. In this room, you’ll find displayed in the Old Masters Gallery their finest works of art  by Picasso, Renoir, Matisse and more. All this at the Zanesville Museum of Art!

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Pottery and glass are featured collections from many local companies in the past and present.

The art museum is a great place for all ages to explore. Art Classes are scheduled twice a month for adults and children. These change monthly for chances to use various mediums of art. Check their schedule for the latest information at Zanesville Museum of Art .

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Zanesville displays beautifully decorated seven foot vases throughout the city.

ZMA Concert Series presents live entertainment in the museum galleries each month at no charge to the public. Sounds like the Zanesville Museum of Art has something for everyone that has an interest in the arts.

Every artist will be drawn to this impressive museum time after time as exhibits change six times each year. That makes it easier to have something everyone enjoys.

The world is but a canvas to our imagination. ~Henry David Thoreau

The Zanesville Museum of Art is located at 620 Military Road in Zanesville, Ohio. Take Exit 153 off I-70 north to Maple Avenue. In about two miles turn right on Military Road. The museum will be on the right hand side. Watch for the large red sculpture.

 

‘Born Hustler’ Now Creates Marvelous Bronze Statues

If people knew how hard I have had to work to gain my mastery,
it wouldn’t seem wonderful at all.
~Michelangelo

                                              

Alan Cottrill's Sculpture Studio is watched over by Chief Nemocilin, an American Indian who helped blaze the National Road.

Alan Cottrill’s Sculpture Studio & Gallery is watched over by Chief Nemocilin, an American Indian who helped blaze the National Road through Pennsylvania.

Often in life, people return to their hometown area for various reasons. Alan Cottrill came back to Zanesville, Ohio in 2003 to open a Sculpture Studio & Gallery at 110 South 6th Street. Here he found the perfect spot for his artistic designs in the former Zanesville News building, where the words from Michelangelo hang on his wall.

Alan tells about all the busts he made during his first two years.

Alan tells about all the busts he made during his first two years of sculpting.

Like many young people from a poor background on the farm, where his dad was a Meadow Gold milkman, Cottrill explored several careers during his lifetime. As a youngster, he never seemed to run out of ideas or job opportunities. In high school, he sold candy bars at lunchtime, worked as a guard, supervised Y-City umpires, and helped at the Skyway Drive-In.

After trying the college scene, the army, and being a milkman himself, he founded the Four Star Pizza franchise with his dad, and became an international entrepreneur. As he traveled the world, art museums attracted his attention and he began collecting art and paintings – his first being in Bulgaria.

Alan with his Sculptor's Bible, an old anatomy book.

Alan holds his Sculptor’s Bible, an old anatomy book.

Then in 1990 in California, PA, Cottrill touched clay for the first time, realizing his intense passion for creating. He sold his business and devoted himself full-time to becoming the finest figurative sculptor in the world. His studies at the Art Students League and National Academy of Design in New York City developed his abilities.

Cottrill sculpted a brass plaque of the McIntire Library in Zanesville, because he said it opened the world to him. His love of books continues to this day. His Sculptor’s Bible is a well-worn book on anatomy, as he feels the need for accuracy in all of his creations, which display intricate design but most importantly, emotion.

Outside his studio, statues line the street making it a treat to drive past his gallery, but it also gives a desire to know what’s inside. His working studio is on the ground floor, with the gallery above. The bronze sculptures demonstrate his passion and curiosity to always be looking for something new. He feels, “The degree of passion in artwork shows the degree of passion one has within.”

Alan checks his favorite sculpture - two tombstones for him and his wife.

Alan checks his favorite sculpture – tombstones for him and his wife.

Once Cottrill receives an inspiration or a consignment, he then assembles photographs of objects, researches clothing and accessories, and then begins the formation of a clay bust, where he makes the face come to life with emotion. The clay he uses comes from Laguna Clay in nearby Byesville, Ohio.

In order to have quality bronze available, Cottrill, along with his lifelong friend, Charles Leasure, established Coopermill Bronzeworks, Ltd.  All of his pieces are bronzed there and they also do work for other artists.

Woody Hayes sculpture at OSU Center

Thomas Edison Bronze Sculpture will soon be placed in U.S. Capitol to represent Ohio.

Over 400 bronze sculptures are displayed in his Zanesville studio. They range in size from 18 inches to lifesize, which takes about seven weeks to complete. While his favorite piece of work is the tomb sculpture he did for him and his wife, the one that receives the most attention is his Woody Hayes bronzework, which appears in front of the Woody Hayes Center at OSU in Columbus, Ohio.

Bronze Ohio Coal Miner Statue

Bronze Ohio Coal Miners Statue stands at the old railroad station in Byesville.

In nearby Byesville, he sculpted the Ohio Coal Miners Statue, paid for by contributions from those who rode the train over a several year span. His Thomas Edison statue has recently been accepted for the U.S. Capitol; while for Cambridge, Ohio, the Hopalong Cassidy bronze statue is only just begun.

Bicentennial Legacy Monument stands on a mound at Zane's Landing on the Muskingum River.

Bicentennial Legacy Monument stands on a mound at Zane’s Landing on the Muskingum River.

Watch Alan Cottrill at work in his studio in Zanesville, Ohio, where you will find the world’s largest bronze sculpture collection of any living sculptor. If you are lucky, he will share stories of his life and his passion. This amazing sculptor still works seven days a week…but doesn’t start as early anymore!

To discover Alan Cottrill Sculpture Studio, take I-70 exit 155. Drive south a half-mile. Turn right onto Marietta St., then right again onto S. 6th St. The studio is one block ahead on the right. Look for the statues lining the street.

Ghosts – Believer or Skeptic

Caution Ghost Crossing! could easily be a sign encountered quite often by members of the Southeastern Ohio Paranormal Investigators.   And on a Saturday in February, ghost hunting appeared to be a very popular subject as the auditorium at the John McIntire Library in Zanesville, Ohio was packed with adults seeking to learn more about ghosts. While the curious were gathering, videos of ghost hunts were being shown to whet the appetite. Members of the S.E.O.P.I. were on hand to give information about the technical aspect of ghost hunting, historic research involved, as well as psychic and metaphysical connections.

Started four years ago, the S.E.O.P.I. has become a popular source for people who feel they have a ghost on  their property, and even for those wanting help getting their ghosts to move on. Tom Robson, lead investigator, said that while they continue to explore all possibilities, “There can’t be an expert in a field with no scientific evidence.” As a youngster, Tom had an experience with the paranormal as well as a deep interest in history. Now he has discovered how  the two seem to be closely connected. What started out to be just a part time hobby for him has nearly turned into a full time job.

The evidence that has been captured is 90% on audio and only 10% on video. There was a nice display of the instruments used to capture the sounds and pictures at the various haunted establishments. Some of their favorite instruments included: the Olympus digital audio recorder, Zoom H1 microphone, and Zoom H2, which was so powerful they said you could hear raindrops three rooms away.

For example, during an Electronic Voice Phenomena (EVP) session on the Triangular Field in Gettysburg, questions were asked of a spirit and there were many responses recorded that were easily understood.  Responses were short such as : “Right”, “OK”, or  “I know”. When leaving the field, the team said, “Blessings to all,” to which a voice answered, “Thank you.” The recording equipment produces some very interesting results.

Historian, Gary Felumlee, presented paranormal research tips, because knowing the time period you are dealing with could be vital for a successful communication. His goal is eventually to show by scientific means that the unusual activity is from the spirit world. Gary recently wrote about one of these historic paranormal experiences in a book entitled Public Spirits Of The Old Putnam District Of Zanesville Ohio.

An interesting observation that Gary pointed out was the fact that you need to introduce yourself to the ghost. That will make them more comfortable and more likely to stay in the vicinity and if you are lucky even answer your questions. So he suggested that you say something like, “My name is ***** and I’m here to learn about you.”

The metaphysical side of investigations was also covered with April Lovejoy explaining the world of crystals and meditation. Often team members wear particular crystals as protective devices from the spirits.  She actually had the entire audience practice five minutes of meditation to learn to focus their mind in one place.  This helps, too, when on a paranormal investigation as it permits the team a close connection to the place they are visiting.

Well know psychic, Ellen Bone, described an actual investigation where through psychic connection they were able to find the location of the spirit and release it from the residence. Ellen’s natural intuitive qualities were always encouraged by her family where psychic activities were accepted as part of the norm. She believes we are all connected, and does her work with honesty and kindness.

Evidence was shared through recordings, photos, and videos. It was surprising how many establishments in the area have had some paranormal activity. They presented information on several places where the S.E.O.P.I. team had been welcomed to investigate. These included many places right here in Ohio: Penny Court, Col. Taylor Bed & Breakfast, and Cambridge Performing Arts Centre in Cambridge; Zak’s Restaurant, Papa Chuck’s Pizza, Zanesville Community Theater, Stone Academy, and Schultz Mansion in Zanesville; Licking County Jail in Newark; and The Captain’s House in Dresden, just to name a few.

Door prizes, including gift certificates, tee shirts, books, and pictures were given out throughout the program. To make the prizes extra special, all were donated by businesses where paranormal activity has been a frequent occurrence.

What do you think? Have you encountered any ghostly experiences in your world? Time to decide: Believer or Skeptic!

Southeastern Ohio Paranormal Investigators are a select group of researchers from many walks of life. The group is based in Zanesville, Ohio and assists residents and businesses that encounter suspected paranormal activities.

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