Places to go and things to see by Gypsy Bev

Posts tagged ‘Harley Noland’

Discover Marietta with Historic Trolley Tour

 


Trolley on Brick Street

The Marietta Trolley explores the city on those old brick streets.

   When Harley Noland opened his restaurant in Marietta, he began thinking of ways that could bring more tourists into the area. That was when the idea of a trolley struck him. This was twenty-five years ago, and the Marietta Trolley has been making tours ever since.

Levee House

The Levee House was a popular place to dine along the river.

   His restaurant, The Levee House, was located on the Ohio River making it convenient to have a Bed & Breakfast nearby on a historic riverboat, CLAIRE E. Both of those businesses are no longer in operation but the trolley lives on.

Harley

Guide Harley Noland brought the trolley to life again about 25 years ago.

   Sometimes Harley still gives the trolley’s guided tour, but there are also several local historians that help with that side of the project now. Each of them has wonderful factual knowledge of the area and tells accurate stories of those early pioneers who settled at the confluence of the Muskingum and Ohio Rivers.

   This is the perfect way to see the highlights of the city while traveling their old brick streets and learn about its history. The city has an abundance of beautiful Victorian homes, churches, earthworks and historic spots that will have you going back for a second look. There’s history on every corner!

   This year the trolley ride begins on Front Street at the Armory, which is the new home of the Marietta/Washington County Visitors Bureau. Then begins the ninety minute narrated tour of Marietta on the trolley made of mahogany with a great speaker system for easy listening.

Westward Monument

The Start Westward monument marks the 150th anniversary in 1938 of the signing of the Northwest Treaty Ordinance.

   Coming from the East Coast, the settlers designated the area along the Muskingum River as “The Commons”. Today there stands a monument to the 150th anniversary of the signing of the Northwest Territory Ordinance. This Memorial to the Start Westward of the United States was carved in 1938 by Gutzon Borglum, the same man who carved Mount Rushmore and dedicated by President Franklin D. Roosevelt.

shanty-boat

Ohio River Museum displays a shanty boat, which floated a family from job to job.

   A stop at the Ohio River Museum focuses on the role of the rivers in the expansion of our country. It gives a chance to view the last shanty boat, which is a complete house that people lived on. There is also the oldest pilot house in the United States close by.

w-p-snyder-jr

Stop back and take a tour of the W.P. Snyder, Jr to learn more about early riverboats.

   The Adventure Galley was the first flatboat to arrive in Ohio from Pittsburgh. The W.P. Snyder, Jr.. is now docked nearby and the last coal-fired, steam-powered sternwheel towboat to have operated on the Ohio River.

   Sacra Via, “Sacred Way”, is an ancient path from the Muskingum River to the earthworks in Marietta. The pathway was surrounded by earthen embankments about twenty-six feet high and was covered with mollusk shells from the river so that it sparkled in the moonlight.

   The mounds are the site of a Winter Solstice Sunset Watch and it is strongly believed these mounds were placed here for an astrological alignment. This site has not eroded in 2000 years due to the heavy clay used to build it up.

Conus Mound

Conus in Mound Cemetery was an ancient burial ground.

   Mound Cemetery contains Conus Mound, a burial mound surrounded by an earthen wall and a dry moat. This was used for burial and ceremonial purposes. The cemetery surrounding it has more Revolutionary war officers than any other cemetery in the United States.

Oil House

This was home to an early family who made their living from the oil fields.

   A bubbling black substance coming out of the ground was put on joints and felt to be a healing compound. It was called Panther Water and used as medicine. When its true purpose was discovered, the crude oil in this town made many men rich. That gives a reason for many of the lovely homes in the area.

Rufus Dawes House

Rufus Dawes house was the boyhood home of U.S. V.P. Charles Dawes, who was also a Nobel Peace Prize recipient.

   An interesting sidelight of the tour are the flood markings on many of the downtown buildings showing how high the flood waters came.  1913 looked like the year of a very high flood.  Many times the flood marks were up to the second story of the old brick buildings. Many of the rich built their homes on terraces to avoid the flood waters.

Newest Mansion

The newest mansion was built by a present-day entrepreneur who makes refrigerator magnets.

   But not all of Marietta’s lovely homes are old. One pillared house was built in the last 17 years by a man who manufactures something you wouldn’t think would be a million dollar business – refrigerator magnets.

The Castle

The historic Castle was built in 1855 at a cost of $10,000.

   The location of The Castle today sets on grounds that were originally used by a potter and his wife. It would have been one of the earliest pottery manufacturing locations in the Northwest Territory. Many prominent Marietta residents lived here including Ohio Senator Theodore Davis. Today it is open as a historical museum to honor the legacy of The Castle families as well as provides educational and cultural activities to learn more about its connection to Ohio history.

St Mary's

The Basilica of St. Mary of the Assumption is only one of the many historic churches on the tour.

   The Basilica of St. Mary of the Assumption was a stop off the trolley to view the spectacular interior, which takes one back to its European roots. The church was consecrated in 1909. The beautiful stained glass windows were created in Munich, Germany. There are nearly 140 images of angels throughout the church. Large angels bearing palm branches and torches can be found surrounding the sanctuary while cherubs adorn each column.

   Beauty like this would not have been normally seen at this time in history or even today for that matter. Many say it compares favorably with Basilicas in Europe.

harmar-historic-bridge

This Pedestrian bridge over the Muskingum River is a pleasant stroll from downtown Marietta.

   Fort Harmar, the first frontier fort in Ohio Country, was situated on the Muskingum River, called the easy way west. Built in 1785, it was named for General Josiah Harmar. He had been ordered by the United States Army to build a fort here to discourage illegal settlers from squatting there. It did just the opposite as made them feel protected by the fort nearby. Tall masted sailing ships were later built here.

Douglas Putnam Place

Anchorage was built on the hill in Harmar by abolitionist Douglas Putnam in 1859.

   The Douglas Putnam House sits high on the hill overlooking the river in the Harmar district. He was the leader of the abolitionist society in Marietta. As one of the wealthiest members, his support of the UGRR was not surpassed. From his house, you could see Virginia on the other side of the river, which at that time was not a real barrier as it was shallow enough to be crossed on horseback.

River Lafayette

The Lafayette is the oldest hotel in Marietta…and haunted.

   The trolley tour is one of the most popular tours in the Marietta area. Parking is free at the Marietta – Washington County CVB at 241 Front Street. Hop on the trolley Tuesday through Saturday during July and August at 10:00 to experience a glimpse of history.

   It’s a great way to discover Marietta!

Confluence Most Beautiful

Putnam said that where the Muskingum meets the Ohio River was the prettiest sight he had ever seen.

Take Exit 1 in Ohio off I-77 to Pike Street. Continue west on Pike Street until it ends at the Lafayette Hotel. Take a right and the Visitors Bureau will be at 241 Front Street. Buy your trolley ticket when you get on the trolley.

Find Victorian Splendor at The Castle in Marietta

Castle

The castle, built in 1855, features many history-related events throughout the year.

Oozing Victorian charm, The Castle in Marietta, Ohio takes one back to a simpler time – from a wealthy point of view. Even though now situated in the center of town, back in 1855 when it was first built, the house was on one of the highest spots in the area and overlooked the then existing town of Marietta. One large tree still stands in the front yard where it was planted over a hundred and fifty years ago.

     Today The Castle is part of The Betsey Mills Corporation, a group of community-minded women, who wish to educate the public regarding Marietta history as well as life in Victorian times. Tours of The Castle are given by guides, who are very knowledgeable of its history and share many humorous stories that make the visit extra enjoyable. If you enjoy life in Victorian times, perhaps this glimpse inside will make you eager to visit there yourself.

Castle - Harley

Harley Noland, board member, initiated the idea for their annual Tour of Homes, and helps at The Castle in many ways.

     Starting in the Carriage House, which now serves as the Visitors’ Center, a video explains a brief history of the people who have resided at The Castle over the years. The property was used by Nathaniel Clark, the potter, as early as 1808 when he made milk pans, jugs and jars. Remnants of their pottery still surface from time to time or are found on archaeological digs.

Castle - Oldest piece

This 1745 clock is the oldest piece of furniture in The Castle.

     In 1855 Melvin Clarke paid $2000 for two empty lots where the house was to be built. Ownership by five prominent and influential citizens began with the original owner/builder, who was an attorney and first city solicitor, and continuing with the person who established the Bank of Marietta, the owner of Marietta Gazette, and even an Ohio State Senator.

Castle - Margaret inside shutters

Margaret Fredericks, our tour guide, displayed the unique shutters inside the balcony.

     All furnishings in The Castle are either original Victorian items, which had actually been used in the home, or furnishings from other Marietta homes of that time. Wood trim and doors were made of red oak downstairs where guests would be entertained, but upstairs were made of pine, as only the family would be upstairs.

Castle- Lithograph

The entrance way contained an early lithograph of The Castle above an old pump organ.

     Victorian times were filled with music. A pump organ from Stevens Organ and Piano Company can be found inside the front door. Two more pianos are in the parlors, as well as an Edison music box from 1892, which played the cylinder records of hard black wax. The song, “Echo All Over the World”, was on display in its original case from Edison Gold Moulded Records.

Castle - Library

Captain William Holden had what they called ‘the first laptop’ on the desk in the library…a wooden box in which he could carry all of his important papers.

     The library showcased Captain William Holden’s box where he kept all his important papers and could close it like a briefcase to take them with him. Some called it the first lap-top. Adults would sit here and read while younger ladies were having gentlemen callers in the adjoining sitting room. Even though the chairs of ladies and gentlemen were separated by a table, someone had to watch and listen to ensure proper behavior was being observed.

     The chairs, themselves, were unique in that they sat very low to the floor. That way there could be no chance that the young ladies’ ankles would show, an act of disgrace during Victorian times.

Castle - hair art

This hair wreath was begun from family hair while Anna Marie Weinheimer had diphtheria in 1866.

     When you wanted to remember a special person, you could weave a lock of their hair into a special design. Men might braid their special lady’s hair into a watch chain to attach a pocket watch to their jacket. The ladies would make necklaces and broaches in intricate designs.

Castle - Chest

This chest was built in Marietta to contain three drawers in which one eastern lady carried her belongings to her new home.

     A unique dresser can be found in an upstairs bedroom. When the lady moved here from the east coast, she only had room to bring three drawers full of her belongings. When they arrived in Marietta, a dresser was built to hold those three drawers. Women gave up a lot to be pioneers.

Castle - bed

Rope beds needed to be tightened frequently to ensure a good night’s sleep, thus the saying: Sleep tight!

     All the furnishings in The Castle were either original Victorian items, which had actually been used in the home, or furnishings from other Marietta homes of that era. Wood trim and doors were made of red oak downstairs where guest would be entertained; however, upstairs the doors were of pine as only the family would be upstairs.

Castle Nye cookstove

A castle cookstove was made in the late 1800s by Marietta’s Nye Foundry, which is still in operation today.

     One beautifully designed wall shelf had originally held a collection of Captain Holden’s, who they called the original Spiderman. He had collected 3,000 different spiders and kept them on display.

Castle - Nathaniel's house

This is part of the original home of Nathaniel Clark and displays some of his early 1800s pottery.

     A section attached to The Castle served as the original home of Nathaniel Clark and several of his pottery vases were on display there. Outside the door near the gazebo, the outline of the original kiln has been found and excavation of that area will take place as time permits. It’s a rather large area about fourteen feet long.

Castle - Gazebo

Near the Gazebo, it’s possible to see a new discovery – the edges of Clark’s original kiln.

     You’ll find a great variety of activities at The Castle throughout the year. Check their website at www.mariettacastle.org for the latest information. There are activities for every age level from workshops and teas to ghost tours and children’s programs. You’re sure to find something of interest!

The Castle is located in Marietta, Ohio at 418 4th Street. Take Exit 1 off I-77. Castle is open April through December. Hours for June, July and August are 10-4 most days, except closed on Wednesday. Sunday hours are 1-4.

Tag Cloud