Places to go and things to see by Gypsy Bev

Posts tagged ‘Scioto River’

National Veterans Museum & Memorial Honors All Who Served

Veterans front shot

This symbolic architectural design houses the new National Veterans Museum and Memorial.

Those who dedicated their life to serving their country in all branches of the service during its many wars are being honored at the new National Veterans Museum and Memorial in Columbus, Ohio. Opened on the banks of the Scioto River in October of 2018, you will learn of their bravery, fears and belief in the greatness of America.

Veterans Memorial

A memorial statue along the outside walkway remembers those who served.

   Symbolizing the strength of our nation’s veterans, the unique architectural design of the building rises from within in a circular fashion to show their service never ends. The top of the building meets at a point to indicate that all the branches of the service come together to protect our nation and our world. This building has been recognized for its special innovative design and contains 28 million pounds of concrete.

Veterans trunks

Open the lid of a veteran’s trunk and hear his story.

   While stories of famous leaders like George Washington, Dwight D Eisenhower and John Glenn are well documented nationally, the stories of lesser-known heroes are often only known by family and friends. The NVMM is going to change all that by sharing their stories with the public.

Veterans letters

Letters from home have always been important to members of the military.

   Visitors are taken on a narrative journey as stories are told about veterans throughout the United States. Letters, pictures, and personal items help make these stories come alive. Listen to the letters they wrote home. Some will bring tears of sadness…or relief that they survived.

Veterans Time Line

The Informational Timeline stretches from 1775 until today.

   The Exhibition Galleries follow the curve of the concrete structure, which shares a timeline of highlights from the Revolutionary War until the present. The walls are covered with information so you have to be selective in what you read or you could be there for weeks.

Veterans drum Revolutionary and Civil

Andrew Avey played this drum during both the Revolutionary and Civil Wars.

   Talking to veterans at the museum was one of the real pleasures of the day. Many had not actually been in combat zones, but all felt an emotional attachment to those with whom they had served.

Veterans State Flags

The display of flags from all 50 states reinforces the fact that this is a national museum.

   Many tried to go out in the communities of the countries in which they were stationed to get a glimpse of real life there. Edward, a Marine who had served in Vietnam, went out with a missionary and played Santa for the children in their village.

Veterans Gear for Boot Camp

Veteran guide, Todd, explained the extensive, heavy boot camp gear.

   Todd, a veteran who is also a tour guide, shared his experiences in the Navy from 1965-69. His job was to patrol the coastline from Alaska to San Diego for Russian submarines. Another veteran, Dale, worked as a supply sergeant in the cold temperatures of Alaska where it was 59 below.

Veterans - Share Your Story

A special Share Your Story recording booth for veterans is located on the lower level.

   The Second Floor mezzanine features a Memorial Room to honor the fallen heroes. Here you will find a room where stories of the veterans can be videotaped for future generations. Many have relatives who have served but they don’t often like to talk about their experiences.

Veterans Memorial Grove

A Memorial Grove of American elms provides a place for reflection and relaxation.

   Outside the museum is a relaxing Memorial Grove consisting of American Elms, a tree that has given shelter to veterans since colonial times. This is a place for rest and contemplation with a beautiful limestone wall, a background symbolizing strength. Nothing relaxes more than water so the pool and cascades provide healing. Native plants appear throughout the area.

Veterans Wounded Veterans Memorial 2

The Wounded Veterans Monument recognizes all veterans – past, present and future.

   National Veterans Museum at 300 West Broad Street in Columbus Ohio is open to the public Wednesday – Sunday from 10:00 am – 5:00 pm. Over half of their visitors are veterans. People from all over the United States, Holland, Ireland, England and France have already felt the emotion of the museum.

   To honor our servicemen, all veterans and active duty military members are given complimentary admission and parking. The same is true for Gold Star families.

Veterans WWI flag

A National Guard unit, “The Buckeye Division”, carried this 48-star flag during WWI.

   Veterans have a special place in our world as many remain active in the community with a volunteer spirit. As one veteran said, “There was a reason we were spared…to come back and do something good.”

   We honor those men and women who have sacrificed to defend our country. They served to preserve our freedom.

Our freedom is not free. It comes with a cost.”

~Lydia Thompson, Gold Star Mother

Veterans OverviewThe new National Veterans Museum and Memorial is located at 300 West Broad Street in Columbus, Ohio just north of I-70. Once on West Broad coming from the east, go over the Scioto River and the museum is on the right-hand side.

Hopewell Mound Group’s Mysterious Crop Circle

Extraterrestrial, Paranormal, or Prank? Recently the Hopewell Mound Group near Chillicothe, Ohio  became a hot spot for crop circle investigation. An unusual sight of an intricately designed crop circle was noticed from an airplane flying over the area.  Therefore, this gypsy decided it was a great time to take a road trip to learn more about the mounds, as well as the crop circle.

Hopewell Mounds Visitors' CenterHopewell Culture National Historic Park’s Visitors’ Center provides an excellent short film giving possible history and reasons for the mounds being constructed in this area.  Located in the  beautiful Scioto River Valley, easily accessible water for daily use, as well as transportation, was of great importance to that early culture.

Hopewell MoundsThese historic mounds were the ceremonial center of the Hopewell culture from 200 BC – 500 AD. A stretch of land along the North Fork of Paint Creek contains the most striking total set of Hopewell culture remains in Ohio. This enormous legacy of geometric landmarks was created by unknown inhabitants prior to the time of the American Indians living on this land. Their name actually comes from Confederate General Mordecai Hopewell, who owned the land when the mounds were first discovered back in 1840. No one actually knows what name those original builders called themselves.

Interesting similarities, shared by the five mound groups in the Hopewell Culture, make them part of a larger picture.  Each field usually has a small circle, a larger circle and a square. Each square is 27 acres and the larger circle would fit perfectly within the square. The large circles all have the same diameter and encompass 20 acres. Many of these appear to have been laid out for their astrological significance.

Hopewell Mound 25The main section is often called the “Great Enclosure”, a six foot high, rough, rectangular, earthen enclosure measuring approximately 2800′ X 1800′. Mound 25 is located within this area and was the site of early excavations in the 1800’s. This treasure trove contained shells from the Gulf Coast, copper from Lake Superior region, and obsidian from Wyoming.  It appears that when the ceremonial life of a site was finished, they built a mound much like we would put up a headstone or monument.

Hopewell Crop CirclesThe recently sighted Crop Circle seems to be located very near this enclosure, but on the other side of the treeline, in the old channel of the North Fork of Paint Creek riverbed.  Since it is on adjoining property and under study, access is not permitted at this time. Circles were first seen from an airplane on September 20, 2012 as the pilot was headed toward the Serpent Mounds. This forty-three circle pattern in standing corn is not visible from any nearby road.   Some thought this pattern resembled a “reversible electric motor” and felt it appropriate to have been drawn near high tension power lines, which are located about 330 yards away. Was there a message intended?

Hopewell Mound Group MapThis map of the Hopewell Culture Group shows its boundaries as well as the location near the upper right hand side of Mound 25. From all information received, the crop circle appeared to the right of the Mound 25 circle and across the tree line. When explored by the Independent Crop Circle Researchers’ Association,  it was determined that the cornstalks were smoothly bent in many swirled and intricate patterns at heights from 2 inches to 4 feet. No footprints were found or any evidence of stepping on plants.

One significant difference came in comparison testing of the length of growth nodes in the crop circle vs those in the untouched field. Those in the circle were elongated, an unhoaxable effect, producing accelerated growth. These effects are often brought about by high levels of radiation.

Hopewell Hiking TrailTook a relaxing walk around the entire Hopewell Mound Group using their hiking trail, which was rather muddy and slippery in spots, and ending on the Bike Trail. Felt accompanied on that walk by someone from that long ago time. Believe I passed close to the spot where the Crop Circle was located from all the clues given, but could see nothing from the ground view.

When asked about the Crop Circle at the Visitors’  Center, the answer was  “there is no tangible evidence”, but they reminded visitors that Hopewell Culture is a very spiritual place.  Guess everyone will have to reach their own conclusion. The mysteries persist! Any ideas?

Actually, this is not an easy spot to find as it’s located in the middle of south-central Ohio without any nearby interstate access.  The Hopewell Mound City Group Visitors’ Center is located at 16062  SR 104, about 1.5 miles north of US 35 just outside Chillicothe, Ohio.  The Visitors’ Center is the best place to start your tour and they have maps available for each mound group. Rangers on hand are very helpful in giving driving directions. If anyone knows the location of Crop Circle University, please respond.

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