Places to go and things to see by Gypsy Bev

The Point on the Ohio River

The Point where the Captina Creek and the Ohio River meet

Chief Powhatan is memorialized here at the Point where the Captina Creek meets the Ohio River. The town laid out here in 1847 was named Powhatan Point in his honor. Captina Creek was the site of many Mingo, Powhatan, and Shawnee Indian camps in the late 1700’s, with exploration by famous white leaders such as Lewis Wetzel, George Washington and Ebenezer Zane.

Today the banks of the beautiful Ohio River provide a peaceful place to watch the barges float by, or relax with a fishing pole in hand in the cool of the evening.

Historical sign

Historical sign

When you enter town, an Ohio historical sign greets you. It states that George Washington camped at what is now known as Powhatan Point on October 24 and November 14, 1770. Some say that is the most important thing that ever happened in this small town, but there was more happening during the last visit.

Chief Powhatan was famous for his dealing with the Whites, but even before the Europeans came to this section of America, he had conquered 30 different Indian tribes. Later Chief Powhatan, with the chiefs from those 30 tribes, tried to recover their lands, which they felt had been stolen by the English and European immigrants.

Kandi's Chief Powhatan

Kandi’s Chief Powhatan

Since the town was named for Chief Powhatan, it seemed fitting for one West Virginia artist, Kandi Roche, to compose a modern day sculpture of the Chief for The Art Gallery at Powhatan Point Village.  The art gallery is situated at what they call “The Gateway to the Appalachias”. Kandi made an unusual Chief Powhatan statue, which was painted on plexi-glass, and left for the community to enjoy. This chief was the father of the famous Indian maiden, Pocahontas (1595-1617), who was a peacemaker to the first white settlers.

A beautiful fence covered with Native American tribal patterns greets you when you arrive at The Gallery here. Inside are paintings, pottery, glass and photography. Art classes have been available from time to time. Since this is a relaxed atmosphere, little is scheduled, but friends enjoy getting together along the river banks.

Community Center

Community Center and home to Christmas in the Village

Just down the street from the gallery is the abandoned Powhatan Point High School, which today has been turned into a community center. During the month of December, Christmas in the Village is held here. The 9th Annual celebration will be held in 2014 with crafts, food vendors, entertainment and of course, Santa. But if funds aren’t made available soon, this facility may be lost to the community.

Kammer-Mitchell Power Plang across the river from Powhatan Point.

Kammer-Mitchell Power Plant across the river from Powhatan Point.

Just south of Powhatan Point is the Kammer-Mitchell Power Plant providing electricity and employment for parts of Ohio and West Virginia. Today this American Electric Power (AEP) plant is partially shut down due to failure to meet EPA standards. They must convert their wet coal ash to a dry coal ash bed to return to full operation. This coal-fired plant has the sixth highest power plant chimney in the world.

Drive through our beautiful land and watch for pieces of history wherever you happen to visit. Every small town has its place in history, and Powhatan Point is no exception.

Drive along the beautiful Ohio River on Ohio Route 7 and you will come to the town of Powhatan Point, about fifteen miles south of  Bridgeport, Ohio.

 

 

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Comments on: "Powhatan Point on the Ohio River" (3)

  1. Taking the back routes of this country is the greatest vacation I can think of – like you said – there is so much out there! Looks like you had a good time, Bev.

    • My life is pretty wonderful right now and I have a good time wherever I go. Some of the small towns really surprise me with their history. Thanks for stopping by again.

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